Top PDF Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

enough work to begin to take both availability and quality of articles for granted, and to integrate Wikipedia into daily use by millions. (p. 140) This latter claim is untested, of course, and can lead to discussions about the value, or not, of peer review: what is the relationship between a scholarly pro- cess of peer review and a Wikipedian crowdsourcing, and why is such a ques- tion important? Likewise, Shirkey’s claim is easier to consider when someone has experience in the process, that is, if students are asked not only to compare Wikipedia with another like text, but also to contribute to it themselves, either by adding to or modifying an existing entry or by beginning a new one. What students learn is twofold, about composing, of course, and a very different composing than they are accustomed to, but also about the making of knowl- edge—about, for example, how a claim that seems neutral to them is deleted as biased by one of Wikipedia’s editors or about how they too have to provide a credible, “neutral” source in order for a claim to be published on the site. In other words, asking students to compare different kinds of encylclopedias and to contribute to one of them helps them understand firsthand the processes of sourcing and of establishing credibility. And in terms of applying this assign- ment to their own research, students find that there are no easy answers to Weinberg’s questions and that one encyclopedia, whether a traditional encyclo- pedia or Wikipedia, isn’t inherently better than the next. They also learn that in conducting their own research, it might be useful to consult both as starting places, to corroborate them against each other, and to explore the resources identified in each.
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Review of Information Literacy: Research and collaboration across disciplines

Review of Information Literacy: Research and collaboration across disciplines

Education Review /Reseñas Educativas 2 and critiques of the previous Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education (ACRL, 2000). Despite their widespread adoption for instruction and assessment by librarians and faculty, IL Standards was critiqued for having a narrow, skill-based, and decontextualized view of IL. For example, the view that information sources are goods or commodities that can be acquired by manipulating search platforms drew the attention of critics. However, the disciplines of Composition and Writing Studies emphasize context, conversation, and active participation as key elements in literacy of all kinds. When students engage in research, they do not simply extract and record new information, but wrestle with the content, draw connections with what they already know, and generate more questions (Foasberg, 2015).
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Undergraduate Research Needs: Faculty-Librarian Collaboration to Improve Information Literacy in Policy Papers

Undergraduate Research Needs: Faculty-Librarian Collaboration to Improve Information Literacy in Policy Papers

Once a year, the faculty member typically teaches an upper-division environ mental policy seminar in the Political Science Department of a midsized, comprehensive, private Catholic university. Among the course’s student learning outcomes are the ability to conduct policy research, analyze a particular environmental problem, craft a clear and concise policy option to address the problem, as well as to improve critical thinking skills and analytical writing capabilities. Although this course is an upper- division political science elective, it attracts a variety of students, in cluding political science majors taking an advanced policy elective, environmental studies students interested in the topical area, and many students (sometimes more than half of the typical enrollment of 25) from the natural sciences and engineering programs who take this course to fulfill a general education requirement. 1 Often, this latter group has little to no background in government or public policy, as the course has no prerequisite. Stu dent library research skills are likewise uneven. Many students have had at least a basic introduction to the scholarly research process and have passing familiarity with at least one library database, but few enter this course with the information literacy skills need ed to effec tively find, evaluate, and synthesize sources.
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The role of research supervisors in information literacy

The role of research supervisors in information literacy

These previous studies are supported by the research student survey data which show that supervisors are top-ranked as a source of information and guidance on information literacy for the elements as a whole (see Table 3.4, p34, for a detailed breakdown by element). The question asked was "For each of the following areas [of information literacy], please identify your top three sources of information and guidance…" with a range of options of sources, along with ‘Other’, ‘None required’ and ‘Required but none available’. This top ranking was tested across a number of cross-tabulations (mode of study, major subject classification, place of residence, frequency of supervisory meetings, institutional mission group, and year of study) and the supervisors’ overall top ranking only changes when the frequency of supervisory meetings is monthly or less frequently (though this does affect a significant proportion of research students: 35% report monthly meetings, and 26% less frequently). As well as being seen as a source of information and guidance there is evidence that supervisors are helping many research students to develop in some of these areas (Figure 3.3, p36, explores this in more detail). The research student survey data also show respondents rating their supervisor more highly than their institution in terms of getting enough support for information literacy (eg 45% of respondents strongly agreed that their supervisor was providing enough support, compared to 29% for their institution; n=907).
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Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

enough work to begin to take both availability and quality of articles for granted, and to integrate Wikipedia into daily use by millions. (p. 140) This latter claim is untested, of course, and can lead to discussions about the value, or not, of peer review: what is the relationship between a scholarly pro- cess of peer review and a Wikipedian crowdsourcing, and why is such a ques- tion important? Likewise, Shirkey’s claim is easier to consider when someone has experience in the process, that is, if students are asked not only to compare Wikipedia with another like text, but also to contribute to it themselves, either by adding to or modifying an existing entry or by beginning a new one. What students learn is twofold, about composing, of course, and a very different composing than they are accustomed to, but also about the making of knowl- edge—about, for example, how a claim that seems neutral to them is deleted as biased by one of Wikipedia’s editors or about how they too have to provide a credible, “neutral” source in order for a claim to be published on the site. In other words, asking students to compare different kinds of encylclopedias and to contribute to one of them helps them understand firsthand the processes of sourcing and of establishing credibility. And in terms of applying this assign- ment to their own research, students find that there are no easy answers to Weinberg’s questions and that one encyclopedia, whether a traditional encyclo- pedia or Wikipedia, isn’t inherently better than the next. They also learn that in conducting their own research, it might be useful to consult both as starting places, to corroborate them against each other, and to explore the resources identified in each.
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Fostering Collaboration Across Disciplines and Generations

Fostering Collaboration Across Disciplines and Generations

Conference format ESF Research Conferences are open to scientists world-wide, whether from academia or industry. The conferences usually last 4-5 days and take place at selected venues across Europe. Attendance is limited to a maximum of 150 participants (including the invited speakers) in order to enable an active exchange of ideas and networking between all attendees.

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From cornerstone to capstone: information literacy collaboration across the curriculum

From cornerstone to capstone: information literacy collaboration across the curriculum

Librarians and academics alike are passionate about how students engage with scholarly information. We want students to build on their existing information literacy skills when they commence university and to graduate with the information skills needed for lifelong learning in their chosen profession and society at large. Collaboration between librarians and academics to embed information literacy into curriculum design is a key strategy for developing students’ information skills. But what impact does our collaborative effort have on student learning outcomes and long-term information seeking behaviour? Are our graduates information literate and ready for a complex information society? At Latrobe University information literacy is situated as part of inquiry/research graduate capability. Librarians and academics invest much time and effort in teaching and learning partnerships at the institutional, course and subject level. The emphasis is on a coherent, consistent and coordinated approach to embedding information literacy into curriculum design across these three domains. This approach is supported by reusable online resources that have been developed by library staff at La Trobe and intended for use in a blended learning environment.
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Research and Writing in the Disciplines: A Model for Faculty-Librarian Collaboration

Research and Writing in the Disciplines: A Model for Faculty-Librarian Collaboration

Follow this and additional works at: https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/gaintlit Part of the Curriculum and Instruction Commons, and the Information Literacy Commons This presentation (open access) is brought to you for free and open access by the Conferences & Events at Digital Commons@Georgia Southern. It has been accepted for inclusion in Georgia International Conference on Information Literacy by an authorized administrator of Digital

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Pedagogies of Possibility Within the Disciplines: Critical Information Literacy and Literatures in English

Pedagogies of Possibility Within the Disciplines: Critical Information Literacy and Literatures in English

P OSING P ROBLEMS TO C HANGE THE W ORLD As described above, information literacy for literatures in English can be much more complex and varied than knowing research tools, MLA citation formats, and Boolean searching. A broader definition of information literacy will allow us to make new and innovative connections within disciplines and between librarians, faculty, and students. Moreover, a broader vision of information literacy can help us forge connections and partnerships with teaching faculty within the disciplines who have similar pedagogical goals and with students who have broader, global concerns. Just as many librarians are drawn to the profession as a way to make a difference in the world, many professors and students in English studies (and not just literature studies) are drawn to the profession “in part,” as Kathleen Blake Yancey (2004) describes, “to change the world through reading and writing” (ix). Many classes are informed by critical pedagogy’s insistence that, in the words of Giroux (2010), “one of the fundamental tasks of educators is to make sure that the future points the way to a more socially just world, a world in which critique and possibility—in conjunction with the values of reason, freedom, and equality—function to alter the grounds upon which life is lived” (n.p.) Although there are many engaging and nuanced connections that could be explored between information literacy and literatures in English, I am going to explore one current within
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Successful information literacy through librarian-lecturer collaboration

Successful information literacy through librarian-lecturer collaboration

Cooney & Hiris, 2003; Dilmore, 1996; Farber, 1999; Farmer, 2003; Gwinn, 1978; Iannuzzi, 1999; Ivey, 1994; Nesbitt, 1997; Sinn, 1998; Tennant & Miyamoto, 2002). The primary objective of the librarian-faculty-student collaboration remains the accomplishment of a short-term goal in response to an immediate research/teaching request. The librarian‟s contribution is bibliographic expertise, providing instruction about how to locate and retrieve relevant materials, and the faculty teaching content knowledge. Several recent trends have helped to make possible more innovative approaches to collaboration (Farber, 1999: 233). Among the most important are the rapid pace of technological change, especially the Internet, a focus on information literacy, and the growing popularity of the liaison model of librarianship. The Internet makes possible the documentation of a sustainable collaborative relationship between the library and the rest of the academic community. Information literacy stresses the importance of understanding the structure and “life-cycle” of information and the evaluation of information resources, an addition to the facility with searching techniques. The liaison model centres on building closer ties between librarians and teaching faculty and students, in the implementation of collection development, bibliographic instruction, and individualized reference consultations.
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A comparison of UK academics’ conceptions of information literacy in two disciplines: English and Marketing

A comparison of UK academics’ conceptions of information literacy in two disciplines: English and Marketing

eprints@whiterose.ac.uk https://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/ Reuse Unless indicated otherwise, fulltext items are protected by copyright with all rights reserved. The copyright exception in section 29 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 allows the making of a single copy solely for the purpose of non-commercial research or private study within the limits of fair dealing. The publisher or other rights-holder may allow further reproduction and re-use of this version - refer to the White Rose Research Online record for this item. Where records identify the publisher as the copyright holder, users can verify any specific terms of use on the publisher’s website.
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A comparison of UK academics' conceptions of information literacy in two disciplines: English and Marketing

A comparison of UK academics' conceptions of information literacy in two disciplines: English and Marketing

what “information” is, and differences in the extent to which the outside world is important. In terms of information sources, with the English academics there is an emphasis on the text (particularly books). This correlates with previous research that has identified that humanities scholars still prize the text. For example, Talja and Maula (2003, 680), in their study of use of electronic sources, note that for English academics the sources “most important for their research are usually books”, or as Ellis and Oldman (2005, 35) note, in their study of English literature academics’ use of the internet: “Many [academics] also stressed the necessity to feel the real object of their academic activities: the printed book”.
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Seizing the gift horse: working across the university on information literacy

Seizing the gift horse: working across the university on information literacy

Research students offered an induction at the beginning of their research studies and follow up guidance. Academic staff offered 1-2-1 meetings to enhance their information literacy skills which will be supplemented with regular communication about other opportunities to keep abreast in this area.

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The evolution of research collaboration within and across disciplines in Italian Academia

The evolution of research collaboration within and across disciplines in Italian Academia

projects that have been successfully funded. This, combined with the lack of information on different source of funding, means that if researchers or sub-disciplines haven’t been funded via PRIN projects in the years under analysis they are not necessarily unsuccessful. It could be that they have been funded via other sources, or that they have not participated to the funding competition at all. Third, data only refer to Italian Academia, and therefore results may vary significantly in other countries. Fourth, data only refer to the decade 2001–2010. It would have been interesting to compare previous years, but the MIUR database does not provide exhaustive information on previous years. Fifth and final, although we are interested in looking at the correlation between the percentage of col- laborations within and across disciplines and the amount of funding disciplines receive over time, we cannot establish a causal link between the two, as it could be that an increase of funding causes a larger investment in multi-disciplinary research, as well as multi- disciplinary research attracts more funding. Therefore we limit our analysis to correlations, avoiding the temptation to regress one phenomenon against the other. Also, research budgets include different expenses, like staff time allocation, equipment, travelling costs, etc., which vary across discipline and are usually research specific. We do not have access to the breakdown of projects’ budgets, therefore we cannot control for the different dis- tribution of funding.
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Using STEAM to Increase Engagement and Literacy Across Disciplines

Using STEAM to Increase Engagement and Literacy Across Disciplines

Abstract This paper explores STEAM as a solution to improving student engagement and helping students improve functional literacy across the curriculum. While STEM is a fairly established approach to curriculum, researchers and practitioners are continuing to develop and understand STEAM and its place in school curriculum. It is important that educators foster this holistic approach to education and strive to participate in active research associated with STEAM. It is also most advantageous for stakeholders to understand the importance of arts integration and its use to support collaboration, innovation, and creativity within students.
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Literacy Across Disciplines: An Investigation of Text Used in Content-Specific Classrooms

Literacy Across Disciplines: An Investigation of Text Used in Content-Specific Classrooms

Chapter V Discussion Although there has been extensive research into literacy instruction in the elementary grades, when students are first learning how to read, literacy in the later grades has not been as thoroughly investigated. The implementation of continual reading instruction that simultaneously teaches students how to best read the specific texts found in differing disciplines is a relatively new phenomenon. Even though it is essential for high school students to know how to read and read well in order to comprehend the information being given in the texts they read across content areas, it is also important that they continue to learn reading strategies that specifically pertain to the differing texts they encounter. In doing this, students are not only continuing to practice the reading skills that they have acquired from prior schooling, but they are also elevating their reading skills across the content areas and learning new strategies to help them comprehend a variety of types of texts.
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Prototyping Across the Disciplines

Prototyping Across the Disciplines

This article pursues the idea that within interdisciplinary teams in which researchers might find themselves participating, there are very different notions of research outcomes, as well as languages in which they are expressed. We explore the notion of the software prototype within the discussion of making and building in digital humanities. The backdrop for our discussion is a collaboration between project team members from computer science and literature that resulted in a tool named TopoText that was built to geocode locations within an unstructured text and to perform some basic Natural Language Processing (NLP) tasks about the context of those locations. In the interest of collaborating more effectively with increasingly larger and more multidisciplinary research communities, we move outward from that specific collaboration to explore one of the ways that such research is characterized in the domain of software engineering—the ISO/IEC 25010:2011 standard. Although not a perfect fit with discourses of value in the humanities, it provides a possible starting point for forging shared vocabularies within the research collaboratory. In particular, we focus on a subset of characteristics outlined by the standard and attempt to translate them into terms generative of further discussion in the digital humanities community.
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Hearing Voices: Research and creative practice across cultures and disciplines

Hearing Voices: Research and creative practice across cultures and disciplines

speakers of endangered languages in collaboration with linguists: one in Botswana and one in western Canada. Linguistically and culturally, both of these areas are among the world’s few fragile and dwindling ‘pockets of residual diversity’ (Nettle and Romaine 2000: 38). In 2001 I spoke at a conference at the University of Witswatersrand in Johannesburg about my project with Kenyan master musician Ingosi Mwoshi. Afterwards, while visiting my friend and colleague John McAllister in Botswana (who facilitated both the Kenyan work and later the Hearing Voices project), I heard a Zulu newsreader on television. At that time, I knew nothing about the origins of ‘clicks’ in southern African languages and next to nothing about language endangerment, but as an artist who is often led by my ears, I was intrigued and inspired by the integration of sounds like glottal stops and palatal clicks in speech and decided to develop a project which eventually grew, with financial assistance from the University of the Arts London, to include a gallery installation, a half-hour ‘composed documentary’ for BBC Radio 3 and a CD-ROM made in collaboration with HRELP. The CD-ROM has recently been updated by David Nathan and myself and is included with this volume of Language Documentation
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Research across the disciplines: a road map for quality criteria in empirical ethics research

Research across the disciplines: a road map for quality criteria in empirical ethics research

Nonetheless, the development of quality criteria or best practice standards might also be relevant for these approaches. The above-mentioned integration of empirical research and a normative-ethical argument makes interdisciplinary work inevitable. It implies collaboration between researchers trained in different fields and methodologies. While it is theoretically possible for interdisciplinary research to be carried out by a single researcher skilled in more than one academic field, most EE research will benefit from inter- disciplinary research teams (e.g. [8]). This is because the skills needed for applying both sound empirical research methods and thorough normative analysis and argument are seldom possessed by a single researcher.
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Analysis of Masculinities Across Engineering Disciplines

Analysis of Masculinities Across Engineering Disciplines

Engineering has remained one of the most male-dominated professions around the world with male-bias in undergraduate engineering student cohorts is still prominent. Little research has been done comparing differences between, or establishing a trend in, enrolment of female engineering students across different engineering departments/disciplines. On the other hand, a key factor in the low number of students entering engineering may be inaccurate perceptions of the engineering disciplines. In this regard, this study is focused on two issues: (1) to examine the pattern of gender-enrolment across the various engineering disciplines offered, in the period between 2003 and 2014, and (2) to review, highlight and clarify on distinguishing information about each area of engineering specialization present in the 5 departments at School of Engineering. A detailed examination reveals that generally, males dominated the entire disciplines. Distribution of female students in engineering departments is not even (both within the subject period and between the departments), and they are, on average, more greatly represented in some departments than others; in particular, Chemical& Process Engineering was found to be the least ‘masculine’, while Mechanical& Production Engineering-the most. The question “why the enrolment of females varied from one discipline to another?” was logically raised, but remains unreciprocated, as it was outside the scope of this concise study. Nevertheless, this study made a recommendation for further survey to address the issue.
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