Top PDF Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

RN: If librarians struggle to make their role as educators visible and appreci- ated, writing teachers suffer from a role definition that is different but equally problematic. Our role as teacher and educator is a given, but what we are expected to teach, and who is seen as qualified to teach, have been shaped by disciplinary, campus, and public expectations. Rhetoric and Writing Studies differs from any other discipline in that our field has historically been tied to but one course: first-year writing or freshman English. This traditional curric- ular moment, occurring in the first year, tends to privilege a narrow perspec- tive on IL, emphasizing preparation for general academic work in college but neglecting broader civic and workplace contexts for IL. Moreover, the focus on the first-year composition course tends to promote a skills-oriented “inoc- ulation” approach to IL, and tends to obscure how IL ought to be seen as a rich, multifaceted literacy that is responsive to changing contexts and oppor- tunities. Writing across the Curriculum (WAC) programs and Writing in the Disciplines (WID) initiatives do offer a far more expansive set of contexts for IL. But here too, writing faculty are often seen as merely providing a service to various disciplines, and are relegated to secondary status with respect to their expertise and their pedagogical roles. As Rhetoric and Writing Studies expands its curricular offerings, it can embrace a more capacious understanding of IL, for example by developing a more vertical curriculum that engages writing and IL at various points and for various purposes throughout the undergraduate experience (Gregory & McCall, Chapter 18, this collection). At our institu- tion, we are fortunate to have a robust upper-division curriculum, and as a free-standing program not located, as most are, within an English department, we may have greater latitude to seize new opportunities for teaching IL. The growing number of Writing Studies majors, as well as certificate programs, provides fertile ground for greater integration of IL throughout the writing curriculum. Likewise, the growing number of free-standing writing programs provides an opportunity to reach beyond the orbit of English departments to reach whole campuses.
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Information literacy programs and research: an international review

Information literacy programs and research: an international review

developments. This should not be surprising, as our profession has an intimate awareness of the information environment and critical abilities to communicate and work with information users. As we leave the twentieth century we can expect to see information literacy issues being taken up more firmly outside the library community, which will challenge us to provide new kinds of leadership to interested others. But what of research? Information literacy researchers are beginning to open new research territories and to provide important insights into people’s experience of information literacy in various contexts. Largely, however, its applicability to the practitioner community is yet to be tested. Thus, new challenges will arise for researchers and practitioners to work together to establish the relevance of completed work and to develop further research paths.
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Research on Information Literacy Education of Public Security College Students in Information Era

Research on Information Literacy Education of Public Security College Students in Information Era

Information literacy has always been the focus of controversy among scholars at home and abroad that the meaning of it is not uniform in academic circles. In 1989, ACRL defined information literacy as people with information literacy understand when they need information, in addition, the people have the ability to retrieve, evaluate and use information effectively [4]. In 2015, the Framework of Information Literacy in Higher Education regards information literacy as "reflective discovery of information", "a group of comprehensive abilities "[5]. In recent years, more and more scholars put forward critical information literacy. For example, Xu Yuanlin combed the foreign research. She believed that critical information literacy was not only specific and focused on content and technology, but also abstract and focused on methods. Critical thinking runs through all stages of learning, problem solving and innovation activities [6].
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Sociocultural theories and their application in information literacy research and education

Sociocultural theories and their application in information literacy research and education

The sociocultural approach has also been adopted in the design of active collaborative learning in IL learning (Lazarow, 2004; Wang, 2006, 2007). From the perspective of sociocultural theories IL is embedded in the activities of particular groups and communities, therefore “we need to understand the practices of these communities before we can effectively teach IL” (Tuominen et al, 2005, p. 341). Practice here refers to the practice of IL integration such as using information to learn, searching or evaluating information to complete a task (Tuominen et al, 2005). In the remainder of this paper we use an earlier study (Wang, 2010) to demonstrate the processes and benefits of using the sociocultural approach to develop a community of practice for information literacy integration, involving simultaneous attention to IL research process and IL curriculum design. First a summary of key features of the study is provided (the reader may refer to the full report for further detail), and then the manner in which key sociocultural principles applied is elaborated.
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Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

Information Literacy: Research and Collaboration across Disciplines

on the sources themselves, which were classified into one of 14 types (see Table 6.2). The category “book” is uniformly described across studies of student source use (Davis & Cohen, 2001; Jenkins, 2002; Davis, 2002, 2003; Carlson, 2006; Knight-Davis & Sun, 2008; McClure & Clink, 2009); Citation Project cod- ing replicated this category and, like other studies, included books accessed in any format. The definition of journal article as peer-reviewed and written for an academic audience is also quite standard, although Citation Project coding replicated Jake Carlson’s (2006) language, “written by an academic expert in the field, incorporating scholarly perspectives such as theory or research, and having an intended audience of other individuals knowledgeable in the field” (p. 16). The category “Specialized News Source and other periodicals” is defined by Citation Project coding the way Carlson defines “Magazine article” (“reporting an event, opinion, or other issue from a non-scholarly perspective . . . written in a way that would be accessible to a general audience,” p. 16), and includes articles from publications such as The Economist, Nature, Mother Jones, The New Yorker, and Harpers, regardless of how they were accessed. In the case of encyclo- pedia, dictionaries, and government documents, again no distinction was made between those consulted electronically and those consulted in print, although almost all of the citations indicated that they were consulted online. The cat- egory “General News Source” includes traditional newspapers that appear in print and electronically, as well as news delivered by television and radio and related websites (where broadcast news and related information is repeated and updated), and via apps, social media, and email and text updates. Neither the reputation nor the politics of the news source were noted, although sources were also coded using a slight modification of the categories developed by McClure and Clink (2009) as “information (apparently without bias),” “opinion,” “advo- cacy,” “commercial,” and “self-help.”
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Teaching Practice Research on Information Literacy Education Based on MOOC

Teaching Practice Research on Information Literacy Education Based on MOOC

As a general education course in the university, the information literacy educa- tion is generally set up as an elective course “Literature Retrieval and Utiliza- tion” in the whole university. GUIDELINES ON INFORMATION LITERACY FOR LIFELONG LEARNING formulated IFLA in 2006 provides a practical framework information literacy education and courses. Students prepare study activities before class, design practical courses in or after class, and accept in- formation literacy education through independent courses and extracurricular courses and other ways [7]. In 2013, IFLA Trend Report pointed out that the in- creasing number of digital resources made information literacy skills more im- portant, the value of digital world to information literacy skills was increasing, and those without information literacy skills, basic literacy skills and Internet technology would increasingly face obstacles to social integration [8]. Colleges and universities carry out education for new students, lecture training and em- bedded courses by classroom teaching and network learning, so as to cultivate and improve college students’ information consciousness, information ability, information ethics, and consciousness, foresight and independence of using in- formation.
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A comparison of UK academics’ conceptions of information literacy in two disciplines: English and Marketing

A comparison of UK academics’ conceptions of information literacy in two disciplines: English and Marketing

Participants were recruited partly by asking librarians to identify potential interviewees (both academics with an active relationship with the library, and academics who had little contact with the library). However, the larger number of academics was recruited by targeting specific academics and departments (e.g. academics in departments with low Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) ratings; female academics at pre-1992 institutions) in order to produce a sufficiently varied sample. The interviews were carried out and recorded by Boon between March 2003 and February 2004, and transcribed verbatim.
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Shared vision, shared responsibility: the vertical integration of information literacy across the Zoology curriculum

Shared vision, shared responsibility: the vertical integration of information literacy across the Zoology curriculum

The vertical integration of information literacy in the Zoology undergraduate curriculum is achieved through the library and the school sharing responsibility to embed learning experiences into the curriculum: the initial introduction of first-year students to the scholarly information infrastructure and methods for finding information from a variety of print and electronic sources; exploring information in the context of communicating science in second year (Tasmanian Fauna); confronting issues and controversy in context of scholarly communication in EES; learning how to use information management software for a major third-year research assignment (EBB); and developing advanced skills to find and manage information for the honours research project (Figure 3).
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Collaboration challenges facing information literacy programs in Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Library

Collaboration challenges facing information literacy programs in Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology Library

The IL collaboration challenges strongly emerging from this investigation are (a) poor public relations in the library which puts off users and other potential IL partners. The way the library projects itself when dealing with other potential collaborators determines relations in other aspects. (b) lack of leadership or initiator of IL collaboration. Other stakeholders look upon the library to propose and lobby for such partnership since the bulk of IL content is centered on the library and information services. Nothing has been initiated so far towards this end. (c) poor planning of IL initiatives. There are pockets of IL aspects that are uncoordinated. The communication skills course, electronic resources training, Orientation and research methods ought to form the basis of IL collaboration with a view to a formal partnership. (d) lack of or reluctance to acquire or share skills/knowledge on IL by both the trainers and trainees. Some members across the stakeholders are not ready to participate in IL training either for lack of confidence, skills, embarrassment or avoid workload since IL is involving. It demands continuous skills updating if one is to remain relevant in the fast evolving information field. (e) low frequency of IL training sessions inter alia, delinks the ardent information seeker from the potential collaborator offering the IL training. This cements attitudes exhibited by users.
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Fostering Collaboration Across Disciplines and Generations

Fostering Collaboration Across Disciplines and Generations

The European Science Foundation (ESF) is an independent, non-governmental organisation of national research organisations. Our strength lies in the membership and in our ability to bring together the different domains of European science in order to meet the scientific challenges of the future. ESF’s membership currently includes 80 influential national funding agencies, research-performing agencies and academies from 30 nations as its contributing members.

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A comparison of UK academics' conceptions of information literacy in two disciplines: English and Marketing

A comparison of UK academics' conceptions of information literacy in two disciplines: English and Marketing

what “information” is, and differences in the extent to which the outside world is important. In terms of information sources, with the English academics there is an emphasis on the text (particularly books). This correlates with previous research that has identified that humanities scholars still prize the text. For example, Talja and Maula (2003, 680), in their study of use of electronic sources, note that for English academics the sources “most important for their research are usually books”, or as Ellis and Oldman (2005, 35) note, in their study of English literature academics’ use of the internet: “Many [academics] also stressed the necessity to feel the real object of their academic activities: the printed book”.
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Research Institute Explores Better Ways of Clinical Data Collaboration Across the Enterprise

Research Institute Explores Better Ways of Clinical Data Collaboration Across the Enterprise

laboratory. These fields now have consolidated solutions, and the demand is shifting toward the extension to other types of media. The approach can be similar, but it has to address the intrinsic diversity of these new types of information. Both administrators and medical IT companies are therefore facing new challenges. Our experience suggests that the issue of being “open” to all kinds of media is critical, since any partial solution would not reach a sufficient ‘critical mass’ to justify the

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Facilitating scientifc collaboration across distance: a user needs analysis of a distributed scientific research group

Facilitating scientifc collaboration across distance: a user needs analysis of a distributed scientific research group

Augmenting the management teleconferences to include a system that would allow participants to make drawings or sketches that everyone could see, and that could be captured and manipulated later may be the easiest issue to solve at this time. There are a variety of products available that would facilitate this. In fact, Microsoft NetMeeting, which is available to members at present, has a function to allow for this, although members have not been using it thus far. It may be that a demonstration of NetMeeting’s capabilities would be enough to bring this feature into use by the Center’s management team. One other choice would be to incorporate an additional Smartboard as is used with the videoconference. Another option is a product called eBeam (www.ebeam.com). eBeam is an add-on to standard whiteboard; sensors attach to the whiteboard itself and to a standard dry-erase marker, and connect to a PC. Information written on the whiteboard is then captured into the PC in much the same way as a Smartboard. Incorporating technology such as eBeam or NetMeeting may introduce new difficulties to the
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Decision making with visualizations: a cognitive framework across disciplines

Decision making with visualizations: a cognitive framework across disciplines

Visualizations — visual representations of information, depicted in graphics — are studied by researchers in numerous ways, ranging from the study of the basic principles of creating visualizations, to the cognitive processes underlying their use, as well as how visualizations communicate complex information (such as in medical risk or spatial patterns). However, findings from different domains are rarely shared across domains though there may be domain- general principles underlying visualizations and their use. The limited cross-domain communication may be due to a lack of a unifying cognitive framework. This review aims to address this gap by proposing an integrative model that is grounded in models of visualization comprehension and a dual-process account of decision making. We review empirical studies of decision making with static two-dimensional visualizations motivated by a wide range of research goals and find significant direct and indirect support for a dual-process account of decision making with visualizations. Consistent with a dual-process model, the first type of visualization decision mechanism produces fast, easy, and computationally light decisions with visualizations. The second facilitates slower, more contemplative, and effortful decisions with visualizations. We illustrate the utility of a dual-process account of decision making with visualizations using four cross-domain findings that may constitute universal visualization principles. Further, we offer guidance for future research, including novel areas of exploration and practical recommendations for visualization designers based on cognitive theory and empirical findings.
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LEXICAL BUNDLES IN JOURNAL ARTICLES ACROSS ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES

LEXICAL BUNDLES IN JOURNAL ARTICLES ACROSS ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES

This study seeks to fill in the gap of the research of lexical bundles by focusing on the comparison of lexical bundles in the four broad classifications of academic disciplines. Biber (2006) has already mentioned that the lexical bundles occurring and applied in one discipline may be distinctive from those of other disciplines and thus, presumably, they may show distinctive uses of lexical bundles which may vary in terms of forms, structures and functions. Qin (2014) found that in terms of the structural forms of the lexical bundles, non-native graduate writers at the higher levels of study applied more forms of academic writing, such as noun phrases with post-modifier fragments than those of lower levels. Grabowski (2015) found that the discourse functions of the most frequent lexical bundles vary across pharmaceutical text types due to situational contexts, functions and target users of patient information. Several researchers (Biber, Conrad, & Cortes, 2004; Biber, 2006; Hyland, 2008) have also shown that lexical bundles vary in their discourse functions (e.g., expressing stance, discourse organization, or referential meanings).
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A critical reflection of current trends in discourse analytical research on leadership across disciplines  A call for a more engaging dialogue

A critical reflection of current trends in discourse analytical research on leadership across disciplines A call for a more engaging dialogue

In approaching this excerpt for analysis with the questions outlined above, one could begin by identifying some of the utterances in which leadership is taking place. If we view leadership as a sense-making process (Pye, 2005; Grisoni & Beeby, 2007; Smircich & Morgan, 1982) or as an exercise of influence (Fairhurst, 2008; Alvesson & Spicer, 2014; Larsson & Lundholm, 2013), we could argue that leadership is happening at several places during this relatively short excerpt. For example, throughout the interaction, both Charles and Ricky are collaboratively trying to make sense of Ricky’s recent encounter with a business partner. Initially, Charles invites his colleague to report back on this recent business meeting (line 1), before giving some concrete and relatively explicit – even if humorous – advice on what Ricky should do (using the relatively direct formulation ‘you should’ (line 6)). By trying to influence Ricky’s future actions (i.e. by using the imperative formulations to “talk to Samuel first” (line 10) and “relax” (line 12)), Charles at the same time claims a leadership role for himself, which is legitimised by Ricky, as his cooperative and affirmative responses indicate. Ricky provides the requested information (lines 2–5) and complies with Charles’ advice and suggestion for future action by giving more information (lines 8 and 9) and repeating his frustration over the meeting (line 11).
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On the Pursuit of Academic Research across all the Disciplines

On the Pursuit of Academic Research across all the Disciplines

This uncertainty has worried academics, because they feel that their fields ought to be built on more secure foundations. In trying to tackle that issue, before the Second World War scientists united in the ‘Wiener Kreis’ sought to establish a theory of science based on pure experience. Their huge efforts and spectacular failure have emphasized that pure empirical observations without any form of theoretical interpretation do not exist. In other words, theories and empirical observations are always linked to some extent, which greatly complicates the testing of competing theories. In other words: within empirical science it is impossible to make an absolute distinction between ‘objects’ and ‘subjects,’ simply because the results of academic research always consist of images of the world produced by humans. They may represent the best available academic descriptions today. But they never represent the only possible interpretation of the world itself, and should never be seen as such. In consequence, these images always inform us something about both the observer and the observed, even though often great efforts are made to push the balance in such a way that the information is mostly about the observed world and as little as possible about the observers.
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Choice and Use of Context Frames to Augment  the Writing of  Result and Discussion Section of Research Articles across Four Disciplines

Choice and Use of Context Frames to Augment the Writing of Result and Discussion Section of Research Articles across Four Disciplines

In the case of discussion section, Writing this section poses a challenge to many writers. It plays a significant role in an RA as it pulls and presents information from different parts of the research, holistically merging the literature review, method, and results to emulate its content (Basturkmen 2009). In this section, the researcher discusses the significance of the results, compares the findings gained with earlier reported ones, and makes claims concerning how findings contribute to and integrate with the disciplinary existing literature (Basturkmen 2012, Hunston 1994). To Ruiying and Allison (2003), it is through this section that the researcher “seek(s) to establish their importance”(p. 366). Sometimes, as in this study, result and discussion sections in an RA are merged and presented together under the heading of result and discussion (Swales 1990) representing a single genre.
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Tracing Metadiscursive Stance over Time and Across Disciplines: A Comparative Study of English Research Articles

Tracing Metadiscursive Stance over Time and Across Disciplines: A Comparative Study of English Research Articles

Discourse analysis has witnessed a gradual shift from a limited and limiting view on texts as ideational units of thought to a more interpersonal function (Hyland, 2004) giving birth to various models of language analysis including metadiscourse. As the foundation stone of the present research, metadiscourse has witnessed the waxes and wanes like other areas of science. As claimed by Hyland (2005a), the term metadiscourse was coined by Zellig Harris in 1959 to represent a writer’s or speaker’s attempt to guide a receiver’s perception of a text. The concept was later developed by Williams (1981) as writing about writing and used to refer to whatever other than the subject matter being addressed. It has also been defined as discourse which goes beyond and above the actual content of the basic propositional information being presented, indicating to readers how they may “organize, classify, interpret, evaluate and react to” (Vande Kopple, 1985, p. 83) information presented in the text. Crismore (1989) has regarded metadiscourse as a “social, rhetorical instrument which can be used pragmatically to get things done” (p. 4).
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Examining Design and Inter-Rater Reliability of a Rubric Measuring Research Quality across Multiple Disciplines

Examining Design and Inter-Rater Reliability of a Rubric Measuring Research Quality across Multiple Disciplines

presentation. Within each of the rubric areas, five different ranked levels (numbered 1 through 5) were developed and described according to the worst possible and best possible scenarios. For example, for the category of Organization, a score of "1" had an associated descriptor of, "Audience could not understand/follow presentation because there was no sequence of information," while the descriptor for a score of "5" was, "Student presented information in logical order, which audience easily followed." Descriptors for intermediate scores of 2 through 4 then were compromises between the two extremes. In its earliest stages, the rubric was very much geared toward a science-based presentation, with associated expectations of a literature review, description of methods, explanation of the results, and conclusions. Of course, this could not apply to all the disciplines, such as some humanities and fine and performing arts fields. Thus, the rubric was subjected to numerous revisions of categories and descriptors to make the constructs more generalizable across the disciplines.
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