Top PDF Initial teacher education (ITE) inspection outcomes as at 30 June 2018

Initial teacher education (ITE) inspection outcomes as at 30 June 2018

Initial teacher education (ITE) inspection outcomes as at 30 June 2018

Teaching in state-funded schools (under local authority control) in England requires specific qualifications, on top of the subject knowledge experience or degree one might have. For example teaching in state-funded primary or secondary schools requires qualified teacher status. Early Years Teacher Status is available for those wishing to specialise in working with babies and children from birth to five. Initial teacher

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Initial teacher education inspection outcomes as at 30
June 2016

Initial teacher education inspection outcomes as at 30 June 2016

Ofsted conducted 53 inspections of 48 different providers of initial teacher education (ITE) between 1 September 2015 and 31 August 2016. These inspections resulted in 88 sets of inspection judgements. Eighty (91%) of these partnerships were judged to be good or outstanding. This is higher than the 82% of good or outstanding partnerships for 2014/15 but lower than the 94% seen in 2013/14 (chart 2).

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Initial teacher education inspection outcomes as at 30
June 2017

Initial teacher education inspection outcomes as at 30 June 2017

Around half of partnerships in each of the South West and London regions were judged outstanding at their most recent inspection (chart 2). The East of England has the lowest proportion of outstanding partnerships - only five of the 31 partnerships are outstanding. The majority of partnerships in London and in the South West are university-led 3 : some 29 out of 46 partnerships in London and 18

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 6710, 6 June 2018: Initial teacher training in England

More recently, in its April 2017 report, Whither Teacher Education and Training?, the Higher Education Policy Institute questioned the use of bursaries as an effective way of boosting recruitment and noted a suspicion that some trainees may be attracted by the bursary but do not intend to teach or stay in the profession for more than a couple of years. The report recommended the replacement of bursaries with a system of ‘forgivable fees’. Such a policy would, it said, “reward teaching and retention in the profession, not training” and would mean that teachers could be free of tuition fee debt by the age of 30. 47
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Initial teacher education inspection outcomes as at 30
June 2017

Initial teacher education inspection outcomes as at 30 June 2017

Around half of partnerships in each of the South West and London regions were judged outstanding at their most recent inspection (chart 2). The East of England has the lowest proportion of outstanding partnerships - only five of the 31 partnerships are outstanding. The majority of partnerships in London and in the South West are university-led 3 : some 29 out of 46 partnerships in London and 18

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Trends in teacher education across Europe: an initial analysis

Trends in teacher education across Europe: an initial analysis

For each of these broad trends, the paper has identified some convergences and some distinct divergence in implementation. So, for example, the analysis shows convergence in reforming teacher education but distinct divergences in how this is being achieved with many European countries moving to higher levels of qualifications (often Masters level) but other countries seeing a proliferation of alternative routes or even the removal of any requirements at all for formal pre-service qualifications. The trend towards increasing the amount of school-based learning is found across Europe but there are distinct divergences in how this is being implemented and what it means in terms of change to the structures of pre-service programmes and consequently to teacher knowledge. The importance of those who teach teachers and the need to pay attention to the quality of their work is also a pan-European trend but national responses to this have, again, been divergent.
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WESTERN NEW ENGLAND UNIVERSITY. Financial Statements. June 30, 2019 (with comparative totals for June 30, 2018)

WESTERN NEW ENGLAND UNIVERSITY. Financial Statements. June 30, 2019 (with comparative totals for June 30, 2018)

The University’s endowment funds and charitable gift annuities are in a unitized investment pool, which is currently invested with twelve investment managers. Endowment spending is calculated under a total return policy, which permits the University to spend 5% of the average market value of the endowment assets for the previous thirteen quarters as determined annually on December 31. Allowed spending of endowed funds totaled $2,413 and $2,400 for the years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Total spending from the University’s net asset funds, including those not endowed, for the years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, was as follows:
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Using 'modelling' to improve the coherence of initial teacher education

Using 'modelling' to improve the coherence of initial teacher education

However metaphors for learning may be misleading (Hager, 2008) and one such metaphor is paradigmatic in professional fields such as teacher education. To what extent do you personally hold and use the metaphor of a ‘gap’ between theory and practice? This metaphor might be revealed when a teacher educator makes comments such as ‘I need the trainee teachers to apply learning theory to their teaching’. A key problem with the ‘gap’ meta- phor is that it assumes that there are two distinct bodies of knowledge, one is ‘theory’ and one is ‘practice’. This is in line with assumptions made more widely in higher education that ‘propositional’ and ‘procedural’ knowledge may be considered as distinct bodies of knowledge (Biggs and Tang, 2011). From a sociocultural perspective this assumption is questionable and pro- fessional knowledge is better considered as professional ‘knowing’ that is mediated, situated, social, dynamic and contested (Blackler, 1995). To this list of the characteristics of professional knowing, and informed by Wenger’s work on practice and identity (1998) it is also useful to add that professional ‘knowing’ is developed in negotiation with identity. As teacher educators it is important for us to consider alternatives to the theory practice ‘gap’ metaphor because such underlying metaphors shape our pedagogy.
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Review of the Initial Teacher Education Infrastructure in Northern Ireland. Overview of. International Trends in Teacher Education

Review of the Initial Teacher Education Infrastructure in Northern Ireland. Overview of. International Trends in Teacher Education

2.10 By contrast, Scotland and Northern Ireland have maintained a strong role for their universities. However, while in both countries schools have contributed substantially to the professional education of teachers, it is acknowledged that there is still scope for the further strengthening of university/school partnerships, with the aim of securing the closer integration of research and professional practice. Therefore, national practice in all four countries requires further development if it is to match the very best models of teacher education identified in the international literature.
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encouraging the teacher-agent: resisting the neo-liberal culture in initial teacher education

encouraging the teacher-agent: resisting the neo-liberal culture in initial teacher education

Bajo la influencia de la "identidad activista" de Sachs (2001), propongo que la educación de los maestros previa la servicio o educación inicial de maestros (EIM), como me referiré a ella, podría, y de hecho debería, incentivar un nuevo perfil de maestro: el "maestro- agente". Este maestro-agente estaría conciente de las presiones y dictámenes de la cultura educativa neoliberal y su consiguiente discurso performativo, y eligiría resistirlo, en favor de una visión más holística de la educación. Esta visión de la educación promueve formas inclusivas, creativas y democráticas de educación interesadas en promover una conciencia social en los niños y personas jóvenes, así como también concibe a la educación como preocupada por el niño como un todo. Estos acercamientos más holísticos a la educación pueden incluir abordajes como Filosofía para Niños (FpN), "Rights Respecting Education" y "Slow Pedagogy", las que pueden no sólo proporcionar un entendimiento más equilibrado y una experiencia más profunda de educación tanto para maestros como para estudiantes, sino también ayudar a los maestros a resistir el impacto debilitante del discurso performativo neoliberal, potencialmente también impactando en su bienestar y habilidad para conservar su integridad como profesionales. Ésto también podría tener el potencial de detener el rápido éxodo de la profesión de los nuevos maestros. Mi argumento es que involucrarnos con pedagogías como FpN en esta nueva iteración de la EIM podría ayudar no sólo a alentar al Estudiante Maestro-Agente, sino también, como consecuencia, a desarrollar al Ciudadano-Agente en los niños a quienes están enseñando. En este artículo considero cuatro áreas clave en las que propongo que la FpN podría jugar un rol en este modelo alternativo de Educación Inicial de Maestros: democracia en acción, el maestro como Maestro-Facilitador, un espacio para la co-construcción del conocimiento, y fomento de la Justicia Social.
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Teacher knowledge and initial teacher education in the English learning and skills sector

Teacher knowledge and initial teacher education in the English learning and skills sector

This section reviews three approaches to conceptualising teacher professional knowledge, each based on different epistemological assumptions. The earliest approach, based on a traditional conceptualisation of knowledge as an objective, external, fixed entity is exemplified by Shulman’s (1987) typology of school teacher knowledge. Shulman distinguished between subject content knowledge, general pedagogical knowledge, curriculum knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, knowledge of learners, and knowledge of educational purposes and contexts. Pedagogical content knowledge is ‘that special amalgam of content and pedagogy’ (Shulman, 1987, p. 8), which comprises ‘the way of representing and formulating the subject to make it comprehensible to others’, and ‘an understanding of what makes the learning of specific topics easy or difficult’ (Shulman, 1986, p. 9). Shulman, therefore, positioned the knowledge trainee teachers need to develop as that which could be, largely, organised and presented in a text book. However, this fails to take account of the different ways in which individuals construct knowledge and the mediating effect of teaching contexts. Indeed, Shulman in later work (Shulman &
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Transferability of ePortfolios in education: The efficacy of ePortfolios in initial teacher education

Transferability of ePortfolios in education: The efficacy of ePortfolios in initial teacher education

As we have seen above, one size does not fit all and within higher education e- portfolios are now being asked to perform an ever widening range of functions. As the uses differ, so to does the required content – components designed to encourage reflective learning do not necessarily lend themselves automatically to inclusion within an employment focused portfolio. Mosely identified three distinct needs from portfolios: a ‘learning portfolio’ for student engagement and reflective learning, a ‘credential portfolio’ to demonstrate proficiency and progress, and a ‘showcase portfolio’ for job search and employment (Mosely 2005). e-Portfolios progress through two distinct stages, in the process having to fulfil a number of separate functions which correspond with Mosely’s identified needs. The first stage is that of the learner while the second is that of the practitioner. In the first stage the portfolio has the functions of assessment, reflective learning and, more recently, as a job search tool, while in the second it promotes longitudinal development of experiential learning. These two stages are defined by Sunal et al as ‘process’, the interaction between learner and teacher as the work is documented, and ‘product’, the demonstration of aquired practitioner knowledge (Sunal et al, 2005).
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Minute by minute: building student-teacher relationships in initial teacher education

Minute by minute: building student-teacher relationships in initial teacher education

Witt, Goode and Ibbett (2013:30) argue that personal channels of communication between students and teachers are particularly invaluable within Initial Teacher Education in Primary Mathe ati s so that tea he s a add ess stude ts a ieties a out thei o le el of mathematics at an early stage. In my experience, when student teachers are anxious about their own levels of mathematics, disengagement can result. However, for those students who said that they felt safe within the personal relationship that had been nurtured in my sessions, the OMPs gave them a place to voice their concerns. This gave me the opportunity to coax and encourage when they were struggling. Indeed, a number of students wrote in the questionnaire that the OMPs empowered them to develop their own learning. My concern now is how to ensure that all students feel empowered to lead their own learning. I want to investigate whether practices, such as the use of OMPs, create relationships where students are equal partners in their learning, rather than consumers (Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education, 2010:7). Although agency is an important trait for all students within higher education, it is particularly important for students who will follow careers as primary school teachers. Student teachers needs to learn to reflect on their own learning, as well as the learning of their pupils, in preparation for a career where teaching learners about learning will need to become their pedagogy (Philpott, 2014:6).
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Towards partnership in teacher education : the development of structure and process in a postgraduate initial teacher education course

Towards partnership in teacher education : the development of structure and process in a postgraduate initial teacher education course

ability classroom it is essential that young teachers consider in their initial training what this means for their practice. The common experience in the school g[r]

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ASU Audit Plan Year Ending June 30, 2018

ASU Audit Plan Year Ending June 30, 2018

Annual Risk Assessment / FY2019 Audit Plan Development Quality Assurance Review Preparation. Board Meetings/Unit Oversight & Marketing[r]

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Expanding the capacity to learn of student teachers in Initial Teacher Education

Expanding the capacity to learn of student teachers in Initial Teacher Education

In a climate which sees tensions between the notions of teacher educator and teacher trainer, and where students (or trainees) are required to meet a set of professional competencies, or ‘Standards’, and to engage at Masters level with the complexities of teaching in 38 weeks, the challenge for many Initial Teacher Education (ITE) providers is to involve students with their own learning. Furthermore, with the growth of a culture of ‘lifelong learning’, and continuing professional development, there is an increasing emphasis on the necessity for a professional body which is able to maintain a full and active participation in the knowledge society. If student teachers are to take on a positive teaching identity in the classrooms of the twenty-first century, we need to consider ways in which they may be helped to understand the sophisticated concept of learning to learn. L2L in preparation for a lifetime of change is increasingly being posited as an end goal of education; demanding a shift in education outcomes from what’s worth knowing to what’s worth being. Promoting, as it does, a particular view of intelligence, L2L has important implications for the way we go about planning for learning, assessing, evaluating and tracking.
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Becoming a teacher educator: guidelines for the induction of newly appointed lecturers in initial teacher education

Becoming a teacher educator: guidelines for the induction of newly appointed lecturers in initial teacher education

educators vary considerably, as do the professional biographies, dispositions and practices of NTEs. As identified earlier, most NTEs enter HE with their experiential knowledge and understanding of school teaching as a major strength. They are also likely to enter the sector without doctoral level qualifications in education or other sustained experience of research and publication processes. But the specific entry profile of individual NTEs will vary, as will their developmental needs. These guidelines therefore recommend creating an entry profile which details the NTE’s past professional experiences and strengths soon after her/his appointment. Alongside the role description, this document can then be used to create an individualised induction programme.
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Inclusive education in initial teacher education in South Africa: practical or professional knowledge?

Inclusive education in initial teacher education in South Africa: practical or professional knowledge?

“conceptual object of study” (Shalem and Rusznyak, 2013, p.1125) which would convey to pre-service teachers that their practice could be informed by theory or a context-independent body of knowledge. The semantic density of these tasks is thus weak (SD-), with pre-service teachers’ own decisions (Task B) indicated as a legitimate form of knowledge of inclusive education. In Task A, pre-service teachers’ attention is drawn to the school’s actions in “tackling” the challenges, and in Task B, the teacher’s knowledge of implementing accommodations is indirectly recognised. The specific “practice-based context” (Shalem and Rusznyak, 2013, p.1125) is strongly demarcated in each task, indicative of very strong semantic gravity (SG++). The message to these pre-service teachers is that meaning is made in context, and enacted in practice. Moreover, the knowledge of inclusive education as reflected in these tasks is taken to be highly individual and contingent, depending on the contexts that the pre-service teacher encounters. Taken together, the four concepts and the two assignment tasks can be
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A Guide to Instrumentalism: Initial Teacher Education in the Lifelong Learning Sector

A Guide to Instrumentalism: Initial Teacher Education in the Lifelong Learning Sector

The tensions between the corporate and democratic paradigms of professionalism have been described as a form of ‘dualism’ by Gleeson and Knights (2006: 277ff) who argue that there are polarised sociological views of practitioners who are seen as either de- professionalised ‘victims’ oppressed by structures of control, or as ‘strategic operators, seeking to contest the spaces and contradictions of market, managerial and audit cultures’. Gleeson and Knights go on to challenge ‘modernising agendas’ which fail to explore changing conditions of work or the neo-liberal concerns framing practice whilst seeking to re-professionalise’ and/or empower practitioners and explore how the mediation of this tension is reflected in ‘professional practices that facilitate political transformations that might advance forms of social, as well as audit, accountability’ (p.278). This analysis acknowledges both the agency of teachers and the structures within which they operate; the professional standards however, imply a model of professionalism in which the teacher seeks to engage with and conform to ‘market, managerial and audit cultures’. This is particularly evident in the standards for Domain A Professional values and practice, analysis of which demonstrates that the terms statutory requirements, quality and evaluation have much greater weight/significance than
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Teacher Education Partnerships: Integration of Case Studies within an Initial Teacher Education Program

Teacher Education Partnerships: Integration of Case Studies within an Initial Teacher Education Program

We carefully selected a case entitled, A Student Teacher faces the Challenges of the Classroom (Author & Author, 2005) that we anticipated would meet the needs of this group. Because faculty advisors function as mentors and supports to pre-service teachers, we chose a narrative, written by a first year teacher that focused on the burgeoning identity and self-doubt experienced by an ingénue. The case describes an associate teacher who is absent while the teacher candidate faced classroom management and supply teacher dilemmas. As well, tensions that impinge on the teacher concerns gender, power struggles, and hierarchies within the school environment. This case has been used successfully with numerous pre-service groups and teachers in their beginning years of teaching. We have noted that each teacher must determine the needs and exigencies of their own practice, and through our case process we added relevant commentaries so that participants can understand that there is never only one way to deal with an issue.
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