Top PDF Innovation in social care assessments for disabled children

Innovation in social care assessments for disabled children

Innovation in social care assessments for disabled children

Enfield used a local inclusive theatre company to engage DCYP in the CDC Learning Model activities. One example that Coram observed was the facilitation of a fun half-day session at a local special school with ten children aged 13 to 15, all with learning disabilities. The session used drama to encourage the young people to share what they liked doing in their spare time, and consider how this was similar and different from other young people. These warm-up activities helped the young people to think about their choices and decisions, which led to role play activities about the assessment process. It was evident that this innovative approach gave young people the space to freely share their opinions on what they thought was good and bad about different assessments that were acted out.
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INNOVATION IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION OF THE DISABLED

INNOVATION IN INCLUSIVE EDUCATION OF THE DISABLED

Children with disabilities constitute one of the largest groups that are still outside the fold of the general education system. Under the existing IEDC Scheme it has not been possible to cover all disabled children primarily because implementation has been based on receipt of viable proposals from the implementing agencies. No conscious effort has been made to target all disabled children. As SSA supports inclusion of children with special needs at the early childhood education and elementary education level, it is desirable to introduce a scheme for the disabled children at secondary stage. The scheme for IEDSS is therefore envisaged to enable all children and young persons with disabilities to have access to secondary education and to improve their enrolment, retention and achievement in the general education system. Under the scheme every school is proposed to be made disabled- friendly.
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Children s Social Care Innovation Programme

Children s Social Care Innovation Programme

It found unexplained variation across LAs in outcomes, quality, value and pace of improvement for children in need – even across areas with similar populations. It found barriers to innovation and improvement which were cultural, structural and legal, at national and local level.

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Specialized Assessments for Children in Foster Care

Specialized Assessments for Children in Foster Care

METHODS The data for these analyses came from a 2-group quasiexperi- mental design evaluation of the effectiveness of a specialized set of services designed to provide a baseline, multidisciplinary health and mental health assessment as well as ongoing monitoring for young children entering foster care in 1 Connecticut town. The Foster Care Clinic (FCC) is a community-based multidisciplinary clinic started in 1985 by 1 of the authors (M.D.S.). 3 At the time of the evaluation, the clinic provided comprehensive baseline eval- uations to young children entering out-of-home care and, through biannual reevaluations, monitored the health and mental health status of these children and facilitated their entry into appropriate services. The coordinated efforts of several independent commu- nity agencies, the public school system, and the State Department of Social Services created a de facto system of care for this unique group of children.
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Children s Social Care Innovation Programme. How to get involved

Children s Social Care Innovation Programme. How to get involved

Rethinking transitions to adulthood for young people in the social care system What do we mean by ‘rethinking transitions to adulthood’? 43. The government wants to improve the life chances of all young people as they transition into adulthood. We know that those leaving care, or with a history of receiving services from the children’s social care system, may need particular support as they become adults. That will also be true of many of those children and young people with disabilities who are in receipt of support from social care services. The aim of this strand of the programme is to develop and test new, more holistic ways of providing young people with the stability and support they need to grow into adulthood successfully. This notion includes having a safe, stable and supportive place to grow up – whether at home, in care or after care; getting a good education and the chance of a job or training; and developing a support network of friends and family.
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Linking Disabled Facilities Grants to Social Care Data

Linking Disabled Facilities Grants to Social Care Data

applications and there is no easy way of linking the two datasets. In these cases it appears that social care departments do not generally record assessments carried out by Occupational Therapists in a structured manner within social care records; indeed many responses referred to paper based record keeping. This will make it extremely difficult for local authorities to monitor the outcomes of DFG as part of the Better Care Fund.

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Referrals, assessments and social services
for children in Wales, 2015-16

Referrals, assessments and social services for children in Wales, 2015-16

accommodated voluntarily, including under an agreed series of short-term placements which may be called short breaks, family link placements or respite care. Timetable for referral and assessments: The current timetables for dealing with referrals, initial assessments and core assessments are set out in the “Framework for the assessment of children in need and their families”.

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Referrals, assessments and social services for children in Wales, 2014-15

Referrals, assessments and social services for children in Wales, 2014-15

Children provided with services Children ‘in need’ are defined in the Children Act 1989, which placed a statutory duty on local authorities to 'safeguard and promote the welfare of children within their area who are in need'. The Act defines a child in need as a child that is unlikely to achieve or maintain, or have the opportunity of achieving or maintaining, a reasonable standard of health or development without the provision of services by a local authority. Local authorities provide a wide range of support services for children and families, ranging from placing a child on a Child Protection Register or looking after it by providing accommodation and parental care to day care, home helps or the provision of assistance with holidays.
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Disabled children in residential placements

Disabled children in residential placements

• a 2003 investigation into SEN expenditure found: “Many placements are made because of a lack of suitable alternative local provision, or because of difficulties in social care”; 17 and, • a recent advisory paper on commissioning residential placements for looked after children and those with SEN and disabilities noted: “Far too often placements are made which may be unnecessarily expensive or remote from home and/or which are not in the child’s best interests and which do not contribute to good outcomes. Placements should be made as the result of a considered process and not due to the lack of suitable alternatives, or to resolve a crisis that could have been foreseen … in many cases, high cost placements are the results of crisis purchasing and can be avoided through more effective
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Assessments and the Care Act

Assessments and the Care Act

> what needs they are likely to have when they (or the child they care for) turn 18 > the outcomes, desires and goals they want to achieve in life – this can include for example, employment, education, training, independent living, friends, relationships, community participation, activities Specifically for carers of disabled children and young carers, consideration must be given to whether the carer is able and willing to continue caring, both now and when the child turns 18, and whether they are or want to participate in work, education, training or recreational activities.
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The utilisation of the care dependency grant for the support and care of disabled children among female caregivers in Orange Farm

The utilisation of the care dependency grant for the support and care of disabled children among female caregivers in Orange Farm

This study found a direct link between the social challenges encountered by caregivers afterhaving received the grant and how they use the grant. Caregivers were found to be under pressure to portray themselves as worthy of the grant and prove that they do not misuse the money. All caregivers share the same sentiment, that the quality of the care they provide to their children with disabilities is judged by the community on the basis of how their children look or appear outwardly. This sentiment was confirmed by neighbours and community members who associated a well-cared for child, with a clean child who dresses properly and wears the latest trends. As a result, most caregivers have clothing accounts either at Ackermans or at Jet as a strategy to ensure that their children are always well presented and that they are not called ‘bad’ mothers or aunts: “If he’s not well dressed people judge you and ask you what you are doing with the money, they say you are receiving the grant but can’t even dress your child, they don’t understand that it’s because we prioritise school.” 69 Clothes also ranked high when doing the matrix with participants, who explained that although it seems superficial, it is one way of stopping people from gossiping about them and their children. They further argued that due to their children’s special needs, they buy clothes more regularly than they do for their children without disabilities. For instance, Dintletse’s son drools a lot and as a result, other children will not play with him if his clothes are stained with the drool. Thus she has to change her son up to 3 times a day and wash his T-shirts constantly, which means that they are
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Parliamentary Inquiry into childcare for disabled children. Levelling the playing field for families with disabled children and young people

Parliamentary Inquiry into childcare for disabled children. Levelling the playing field for families with disabled children and young people

There is a consensus across parent carers, local authorities and provider associations that the childcare workforce lacks widespread understanding of disability and inclusion in general, as well as knowledge of skills required to include disabled children. Local authorities have the duty to secure information, advice and training under the Childcare Act 2006 and they should consider this alongside their duties to provide sufficiency. However, respondents agree that access to training provision and continuous professional development is inadequate. Some Inquiry respondents commented that resources and expertise that is available to schools is not readily available in the childcare sector due to limitations on staff and resources. In addition, funding restraints mean that the childcare workforce is often excluded from staff development enjoyed by statutory partners in Health, Education and Social Care.
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Financing Health Care for Disabled Children

Financing Health Care for Disabled Children

National Center for Health Statistics: Procedures and questionnaires of the National Medical Care Utilization and Expenditure Survey, National Medical Care Utiliza- tion and Expenditure [r]

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Perceived First Contact Care for Disabled Children

Perceived First Contact Care for Disabled Children

Consid- enng only the group living 90 miles or less away from the medical center, the mothers of children with L-3 or higher levels of paralysis cited clinic professionals 89% of the tim[r]

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A Study of Social Maturity and Adjustment in Intellectually Disabled Children.

A Study of Social Maturity and Adjustment in Intellectually Disabled Children.

The level of social maturity and adjustment in intellectually challenged individuals has wide implications for the level of support needed in their literacy or vocational training as well as their integration in the society. The present study evaluated social development and adjustment levels of 40 mentally retarded children (20 at mild MR level and 20 at moderate MR level) between the age range of 8-12 years who were administered Vineland Social Maturity Scale and Child Adjustment Scale. Results indicate that there is a significant difference between the social development as well as adjustment levels of mild and moderately mentally challenged children. Further, significant correlations exist between social maturity and different areas of adjustment implying that low social development is predictive of poor adjustment.
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Dimensions of social sensitivity in two types of learning-disabled children.

Dimensions of social sensitivity in two types of learning-disabled children.

700 case records o f children re fe rre d to the Neuropsychology U n it, Regional Children's Centre, Windsor Western Hospital Centre. In a l l cases, the subjects had been re fe rre d because of a "learning" and/or a "perceptual" problem to which i t was thought th a t cerebral dysfunction might be a contributing fa c t o r . The subjects had received extensive neuropsychological assessments w ith in two years previous to the time of the study. A comprehensive description o f the assessment procedures employed can be found in Rourke (1975, 1976a). According to the working d e f in it io n adopted by Rourke (1976a) a learning d i s a b i l i t y is seen as a re ta rd a tio n or delayed development in one or more o f the processes of speech, language, reading, w r it in g , a r ith m e tic , or other school subjects which re s u lts from fac to rs other than emotional disturbance, mental
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Disabled Adult Children

Disabled Adult Children

Child must be living with insured or receiving contributions for support at time of insured's death or when child applied, or, if insured had period of disability that lasted until ins[r]

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Comprehensive Assessments for Children Entering Foster Care: A National Perspective

Comprehensive Assessments for Children Entering Foster Care: A National Perspective

Although research to date has conclusively docu- mented the high rates of physical, mental, and de- velopmental health problems in children in foster care, these results demonstrate a significant gap be- tween need for assessment for developmental and behavioral problems in children in foster care and practice in the community. These findings argue for ongoing research regarding early identification of problems on entry into out-of-home care. First, re- search is needed to examine the relative benefits and limitations of assessments for physical, mental, and developmental health needs on entry into care as compared with assessments obtained after a period of stabilization in out-of-home care. Second, more longitudinal research is needed addressing the ben- efits of early identification and intervention for phys- ical, mental, and developmental health problems for these high-risk children. If evidence were available, it would move the CWLA and AAP’s calls for inclusive assessments from the realm of expert opinion to evidence-based guidelines. These research efforts will need to address cultural sensitivity and validity given the high proportion of children of color in the child welfare rolls. Third, research is needed to de- termine the relative efficacy and cost-effectiveness of different mechanisms for assuring that children’s physical, mental, and developmental health prob- lems are addressed when they enter foster care, in- cluding the benefits of inclusive policies, the charac- teristics of providers assessing children, and the types of tools used in those assessments.
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Inclusive social networks and inclusive schools for disabled children of migrant families

Inclusive social networks and inclusive schools for disabled children of migrant families

This research project (carried out between March 2008 and Novem- ber 2010) aims to investigate the relationship between migrant disabled students and the Italian school system. It was commis- sioned by the City of Bologna – Department of Education and Anti-discrimination Policies – which aimed to adopt guidelines and tools to facilitate the inclusion of migrant disabled students aged 0–14. The scale of the migratory phenomenon and impact on the education and health systems of the host countries have given rise to new organizational, social and cultural problems; schools and education services play a key role in facilitating the process of inclusion, not only by offering appropriate responses to the cul- tural transformations, but also by fostering cultural exchange and dialogue among youths and educating them on global coexistence. Schools are the best environments for meeting the needs of families by making them feel welcome; this is confirmed by teachers them- selves, who however seek greater support from local services, also in terms of the involvement and participation of migrant families (with the presence of cultural mediators). Here, we focus on: a
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MEDICAL NEGLECT OF DISABLED CHILDREN

MEDICAL NEGLECT OF DISABLED CHILDREN

Children In addition to infants less than one year of age, the standards set forth in the above definition of “withholding of medically indicated treatment” should be considered thoroughly in the evaluation of any issues of medical neglect involving a child older than one year of age who has been continuously hospitalized since birth, who was born extremely prematurely, or who has a long-term disability. This includes children who may be seen as medically fragile, or those who may be seen at an increased level of vulnerability based on their medical needs; see PSM 713-04.
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