Top PDF A Journey of Process Safety Management Program for Process Industry

A Journey of Process Safety Management Program for Process Industry

A Journey of Process Safety Management Program for Process Industry

Abstract- The growth of process industries and global economies are dependent on technology advances and innovations. However, the effects of these advancements often lead to more complex processes and comparatively severe operating conditions such as high pressure, temperature and reactive chemical with exotic chemistry. With the rapidly increasing scale and complexity of the process, it is becoming harder to control accidents in process plants. In most of the past situations, it appears that accidents could not be controlled solely by engineering practices and traditional occupational safety but should be immersed with safety management programs specifically Process Safety Management (PSM) to enhance the effectiveness of technical solutions. This paper addressed PSM program as stipulated by OSHA 29 CFR 1910.119. The PSM standard was implemented following a number of disasters, including accidents in Bhopal, India (1984) and Pasadena, Texas (1989). In Malaysia, Control of Industrial Major Accident Hazards (CIMAH) 1996 Regulation which has the requirements attribute to PSM standard also discussed.
Show more

9 Read more

The adoption of software process improvement (SPI) program in the construction industry

The adoption of software process improvement (SPI) program in the construction industry

Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia. ABSTRACT Integrating the design process and automating the construction process are called for in the Industrialised Building System (IBS) Roadmap 2003-2010 and the Construction Industry Master Plan (CIMP) 2006-2015. Hence, the industry needs to improve the construction delivery process by having as many processes utilizing advanced IT/ICT technologies. With a goal of producing zero product failure and meeting the users’ requirement satisfaction, this is an initial study into automating the construction tasks by studying a systematic process management commonly used for software implementation. We present a feasibility study on the use of a Software Process Improvement (SPI) Program in an IT organization—assuming that the construction organization will become an implementer of computer-integrated procedures in the future. Based on a case study conducted at a local IT software company, it documents the implementation of a SPI program to improve the internal software process development. The study uses the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) from Software Engineering Institute as SPI framework and IDEAL model-SPI life cycle model for executing and managing SPI program. Results show that the SPI Program model is successful in terms of the IT organization increasing its work productivity, high end-user product satisfaction and reduction of software defects. The paper concludes with discussions on how we can bridge computer science approach into the construction industry, thereby contributing to the development of future theoretical and application methodologies towards applying IT/ICT initiatives in the local construction industry.
Show more

12 Read more

INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVE PETROBRAS APPROACH TO ASPECTS OF ASSET INTEGRITY / PROCESS SAFETY

INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVE PETROBRAS APPROACH TO ASPECTS OF ASSET INTEGRITY / PROCESS SAFETY

The presentation may contain forecasts about future events. Such forecasts merely reflect the expectations of the Company's management. Such terms as "anticipate", "believe", "expect", "forecast", "intend", "plan", "project", "seek", "should", along with similar or analogous expressions, are used to identify such forecasts. These predictions evidently involve risks and uncertainties, whether foreseen or not by the Company. Therefore, the future results of operations may differ from current expectations, and readers must not base their expectations exclusively on the information presented herein. The Company is not obliged to update the
Show more

23 Read more

Risk management process in banking industry

Risk management process in banking industry

for their requirements find the necessary resources from financial intermediaries or directly from the financial markets. This process is crucial for an economy so that the most valuable and profitable projects can obtain the required capital. Therefore, surplus units can participate directly (as a shareholder) or indirectly (receiving interest) to those plans. It is the opportunity to join any economic activity that generates income. Otherwise, under circumstances where there is inflation, the value of money continue to diminish. Wisely, the choice is to invest the surplus money in protecting and acquiring capital gains. Previously, the original purpose of the banks was to provide safety for money in the vault, and this function is still relevant as customers expect banks to safeguard their wealth. Although with the above explanations, banks offer the possibility for investment and security, this not only provides the best option for its customers but also increases the possibility to earn income from interest.
Show more

37 Read more

Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

A well known example of a cyber attack that had disastrous results occurred in Australia. A contractor who had been instrumental in installing the network for a waste management company “caused millions of litres of raw sewage to spill out into local parks, rivers and even the grounds of a Hyatt Regency hotel. . . Marine life died, the creek water turned black and the stench was unbearable for residents.” 2 A series of cyber attacks had been occurring for at least 2 months before the waste management company learned what was happening and identified the source of the trouble.
Show more

8 Read more

NATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM NCHRP REPORT 501. Integrated Safety Management Process

NATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM NCHRP REPORT 501. Integrated Safety Management Process

Departments of motor vehicles maintain driver records of all licensed drivers in the state. Driver records are typically generated when a person enters the state licensing system to obtain a license or when unlicensed drivers have had a violation or crash in the state. The record contains basic identifiers (e.g., name, address, driver license number), demographic information on the driver (e.g., birth date, gender), and information relevant to license and driver improvement actions (e.g., license issuance and expiry/renewal dates, license class, violation dates, suspension periods). In some states, information on crash involvements (e.g., occurrence date, crash severity) is also available. Driver records are especially useful for examining issues related to driving history and rates of recidivism (e.g., re-offending for moving violations and traffic-related criminal convictions). However, many states purge the driver record of information on driving history after a certain period of time. Consequently, driver records are incomplete and drivers identified as first-time offenders may have had previous convictions for the same offence. Departments of transportation are typically responsible for providing and maintaining the safe and efficient move- ment of people and resources on the state transportation network. Their highway crash database typically contains crash data, location codes, traffic volume information, and transportation network information, including highway and road inventory information. Some states also collect other types of roadway data, such as information on curves and intersections. Such information is used, for example, to locate hazardous sections and sites on roadways that require or are amenable to highway engineering and safety improvements.
Show more

156 Read more

Process Safety Management Guide. 4th Edition

Process Safety Management Guide. 4th Edition

This document was prepared by the Process Safety Management Division of the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering (CSChE). It is based on earlier editions developed through the Major Industrial Accidents Council of Canada (MIACC), a voluntary alliance of interested parties dedicated to reducing the frequency and severity of major industrial accidents. From 1987 until its dissolution in 1999, this partnership included the federal, provincial and municipal governments, industry, labour, emergency response groups, public interest groups and academia. Rights to the document were transferred to the CSChE on the dissolution of MIACC in 1999. It is sincerely hoped that the information in this document, which provides introductory guidelines for users to consider and not standards or procedures that must be followed, will lead to an even better safety record for the process industries of Canada.
Show more

39 Read more

PROCESS SAFETY MANAGEMENT OF HIGHLY HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

PROCESS SAFETY MANAGEMENT OF HIGHLY HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

4. Process Hazard Analysis. A process hazard analysis (PHA), sometimes called a process hazard evaluation, is one of the most important elements of the process safety management program. A PHA is an organized and systematic effort to identify and analyze the significance of potential hazards associated with the processing or handling of highly hazardous chemicals. A PHA provides information which will assist employers and employees in making decisions for improving safety and reducing the consequences of unwanted or unplanned releases of hazardous chemicals. A PHA is directed toward analyzing potential causes and consequences of fires, explosions, releases of toxic or flammable chemicals and major spills of hazardous chemicals. The PHA focuses on equipment, instrumentation, utilities, human actions (routine and non-routine), and external factors that might impact the process. These considerations assist in determining the hazards and potential failure points or failure modes in a process. The selection of a PHA methodology or technique will be influenced by many factors including the amount of existing knowledge about the process. Is it a process that has been operated for a long period of time with little or no innovation and extensive experience has been generated with its use? Or, is it a new process or one which has been changed frequently by the inclusion of innovative features? Also, the size and complexity of the process will influence the decision as to the appropriate PHA methodology to use. All PHA methodologies are subject to certain limitations. For example, the checklist methodology works well when the process is very stable and no changes are made, but it is not as effective when the process has undergone extensive change. The checklist may miss the most recent changes and consequently the changes would not be evaluated. Another limitation to be considered concerns the assumptions made by the team or analyst. The PHA is dependent on good judgment and the
Show more

47 Read more

PROCESS SAFETY MANAGEMENT OF HIGHLY HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

PROCESS SAFETY MANAGEMENT OF HIGHLY HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

The applicable codes and standards provide criteria for external inspections for such items as foundation and supports, anchor bolts, concrete or steel supports, guy wires, nozzles and sprinklers, pipe hangers, grounding connections, protective coatings and insulation, and external metal surfaces of piping and vessels, etc. These codes and standards also provide information on methodologies for internal inspection, and a frequency formula based on the corrosion rate of the materials of construction. Also, erosion both internal and external needs to be considered along with corrosion effects for piping and valves. Where the corrosion rate is not known, a maximum inspection frequency is recommended, and methods of developing the corrosion rate are available in the codes. Internal inspections need to cover items such as vessel shell, bottom and head; metallic linings; nonmetallic linings; thickness measurements for vessels and piping; inspection for erosion, corrosion, cracking and bulges; internal equipment like trays, baffles, sensors and screens for erosion, corrosion or cracking and other deficien- cies. Some of these inspections may be performed by state or local government inspec- tors under state and local statutes. However, each employer needs to develop proce- dures to ensure that tests and inspections are conducted properly and that consistency is maintained even where different employees may be involved. Appropriate training is to be provided to maintenance personnel to ensure that they understand the preventive maintenance program procedures, safe practices, and the proper use and application of special equipment or unique tools that may be required. This training is part of the over- all training program called for in the standard.
Show more

40 Read more

WHITE PAPERS. Process Safety Management

WHITE PAPERS. Process Safety Management

Eight reasons to ditch the paper and go digital with PSM The building blocks of a successful Process Safety Management (PSM) program are detailed piping and in- strumentation diagrams (P&IDs) and standard operating procedures (SOPs). In this white paper, we offer the key elements to include in these documents, along with the benefits of implementing a digital PSM program. The end game is having a successful PSM compliance audit so we’ll share some of the top violations and how to avoid them.

7 Read more

Process Safety Management: Regulatory Scan

Process Safety Management: Regulatory Scan

 Recommendation that OSHA issue a fuel gas safety standard for construction and general industry. This recommendation issued in June 2010 followed two catastrophic accidents that occurred that year: In one, an explosion caused a roof collapse at the ConAgra Slim Jim facility in Garner, North Carolina, killing four workers and injuring 67 others. A worker had been attempting to purge new natural gas piping during the installation of an industrial water heater, resulting in a large release of natural gas indoors. In the other, at the Kleen Energy power plant in Middletown, Connecticut, high-pressure natural gas was being used to clean new piping and was released in a congested outdoor area. It ignited, killing six workers and injuring at least 50.
Show more

56 Read more

Process Safety Progress, January 1994, AIChE The Cost and Benefits of Process Safety Management: Industry Survey Results

Process Safety Progress, January 1994, AIChE The Cost and Benefits of Process Safety Management: Industry Survey Results

Process safety management (PSM) is a relatively new phrase that encompasses many activities for controlling process-related hazards in the workplace. These activities (also called PSM elements) have been maturing at different rates over the past two decades. Since 1986, state and federal regulators have been mandating implementation of PSM programs at workplaces that handle hazardous chemicals, including explosives, toxics, and flammables. Before promulgating their regulations, the regulators estimated the cost and benefit of compliance with these regulations, but in all cases their cost estimates have fallen orders of magnitude short of actual implementation costs. This paper presents the actual costs that some companies have expended and provides estimates of future costs to comply with either self-imposed standards or government regulations related to PSM. The data on actual costs were provided in response to a recent survey. The costs are broken into categories so that companies just now
Show more

17 Read more

Combining a Safety Management Process with a Safety Framework

Combining a Safety Management Process with a Safety Framework

not identify a suitable method of establishing this re- quirement. This stage of the process can be used to iden- tify the readiness or otherwise of a client to operate the solution successfully but there needs to be some method of documenting this. The roles aspects of the requirement elicitation process are dealt with by the Safety Frame- work using views OG3 to OG5. The framework suggests a variety of industry standard methods to document these views and establish the roles of individuals and groups to achieve these responsibilities. +PFW is lacking in this level of detail stating merely that it is a requirement to establish the roles and responsibilities without indicating how this could be achieved. Combining the process and the Safety Framework using the Operational Views OG3 to OG5 allows a much more complete development of the requirement to identify the roles. Thus once again +PFW could be enhanced by the application of the Safety Framework.
Show more

10 Read more

Software Process Improvement Journey: IBM Australia Application Management Services

Software Process Improvement Journey: IBM Australia Application Management Services

− skills blend − succession plans 5.2.5 Process Improvement Team To make changes within an organization, communication is essential. Getting the message across and having it understood and implemented can often prove to be quite difficult. Usu- ally, Process Improvement Teams (PITs), or those personnel who must develop and imple- ment organizational processes and tools, do not possess an endless supply of resources to get the job done, even though they are sponsored and funded. The business, after all, must con- tinue to operate successfully even if it is in the middle of a process improvement program. The PIT model is one that worked successfully within AMS Australia. It was implemented differently for SW-CMM levels 2 and 3 and CMMI-SE/SW levels 4 and 5, but in essence the idea was to have a group of people in the business (in the project areas) separate to the usual core team that develops and maintains the organization’s processes and tools.
Show more

90 Read more

Business Process Management and Inter-Industry Collaboration

Business Process Management and Inter-Industry Collaboration

Abstract. According to the Object Management Group, a rule is a proposition that is a claim of obligation or of necessity. The concept of rule is usually employed in the context of business process to manage companies operations. While a work- flow is an explicit specification of tasks’ execution flow, business rules only impose restrictions on the tasks’ execution. This provides a great deal of flexibility for the process execution, since the stakeholders are free to choose an execution flow which does not violate the rules. The execution of a task in a process can be seen as the occurrence of an event, which may enable/disable the execution of some other tasks in the process. Event-driven programming is a paradigm in which the program control-flow is determined by the occurrence of events. The capacity to handle processes that are unpredictably non-linear and dynamic makes the event-driven paradigm an effective solution for the implementation of business rules. However, the connection between the business rules and their implementation through event- driven programming has been made in an ad-hoc and unstructured manner. This paper proposes a methodology to tackle such a problem by systematically moving from business rules described in natural language toward a concrete implementa- tion of a business process. We use complex event processing (CEP) to implement the process. CEP relies on the event driven paradigm for monitoring and process- ing events. The methodology allows for the active participation of business people at all stages of the refinement process. Throughout the paper, we show how our methodology was employed to implement the operations of the World Bank.
Show more

26 Read more

Merrill Lynch & Co. Process Risk Management Program

Merrill Lynch & Co. Process Risk Management Program

message sent by the regulatory community to the industry is that process risk is adequately addressed by the computation of a capital figure – as opposed to the creation of controls. „ Given our view that it is behavior – not quantitative modeling – that is important in managing process risk, our comments on the Basle proposal are as follows:

12 Read more

Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

A well known example of a cyber attack that had disastrous results occurred in Australia. A contractor who had been instrumental in installing the network for a waste management company “caused millions of litres of raw sewage to spill out into local parks, rivers and even the grounds of a Hyatt Regency hotel. . . Marine life died, the creek water turned black and the stench was unbearable for residents.” 2 A series of cyber attacks had been occurring for at least 2 months before the waste management company learned what was happening and identified the source of the trouble.
Show more

8 Read more

The creative process, journey to first animation

The creative process, journey to first animation

I am stating the obvious here. Everybody knows how they can finish projects, but it takes much effort and motivation. For that there are no magic tricks. I couldn’t have finished my project without learn- ing the artistic processes that work for me. When finishing project that takes more than 800 hours, you need to have a plan. I made excuses like: this is the way I am, I have no patience, or my way of doing is by controlled chaos and I know what I am doing. In my case I did not. I had the creative chaos but no control. When I was considering what to write about in my thesis, I wanted to document and investigate how my artistic process evolved and how I can use this knowledge in the future.
Show more

77 Read more

Process Management in Football Youth Development Program

Process Management in Football Youth Development Program

Children who started their education activities in sports schools constitute the input part of football academies. Among these inputs, children who are thought to have the ability to play football are included in academic education and training as part of process management. Harmon (2011) states that the process of converting inputs into more valuable outputs is called process transformation and Doğan (2013) states that Inputs can usually be converted to four types in the process: physical, spatial, valuable and computational. These findings are considered to be close to the author's findings.
Show more

14 Read more

Environmental and occupational noise management process in cement industry

Environmental and occupational noise management process in cement industry

production are the consumption of raw materials, energy use and emissions in the air. Noise emissions occur throughout the whole cement manufacturing process - from preparing and processing raw materials, from the clinker burning and cement production process, from material storage as well as from the dispatch and shipping of the final products. The heavy machinery and large fans used in the cement manufacturing process can give rise to noise emissions. Cement Plants are required to comply with standards for reduction in line with national legislation, and to conduct measurements and perform noise surveys.
Show more

6 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...