Top PDF Know the Right People? Recommender Systems for Web 2.0.

Know the Right People? Recommender Systems for Web 2.0.

Know the Right People? Recommender Systems for Web 2.0.

Such systems are not without their deficiencies, the most °®±³·²»²¬ ±º ©¸·½¸ ¿®·-» ©¸»² ²»© ·¬»³- ¿²¼ ²»© «-»®- ¿®» ¿¼¼»¼ ¬± ¬¸» -§-¬»³ ó ½±³³±²´§ ®»º»®®»¼ ¬± ¿- ¬¸» ®¿³°ó«° °®±¾´»³ ÅîïÃò Í·²½» ¾±¬¸ ½±²¬»²¬ó¾¿-»¼ ¿²¼ ½±´ó ´¿¾±®¿¬·ª» ®»½±³³»²¼»® -§-¬»³- ®»´§ ±² ®¿¬·²¹- ¬± ¾«·´¼ ¿ user’s profile of interest, new users with no ratings have neutral profiles. When new items are added to a collabora- ¬·ª» ®»½±³³»²¼»® -§-¬»³ô ¬¸»§ ©·´´ ²±¬ ¾» ®»½±³³»²¼»¼ «²¬·´ -±³» «-»®- ¸¿ª» ®¿¬»¼ ¬¸»³ò ݱ´´¿¾±®¿¬·ª» -§-¬»³- ¿´-± ¼»°»²¼ ±² ¬¸» ±ª»®´¿° ·² ®¿¬·²¹- ¿½®±-- «-»®- ¿²¼ °»®ó º±®³ ¾¿¼´§ ©¸»² ®¿¬·²¹- ¿®» -°¿®-» ø·ò»ò º»© «-»®- ¸¿ª» rated the same items) because it is hard to find similar ²»·¹¸¾±®-ò
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Global Grids Web 2 0 and Globalization

Global Grids Web 2 0 and Globalization

Systems like OSCAR3, Google Scholar, Microsoft Academic Live and Citeseer cannot fully analyze knowledge in papers unless get access to full text Current publishing model hindering and n[r]

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Web 2 0 moves 2 0 quickly 2 0 wait: setting up a library Facebook presence at the University of Warwick

Web 2 0 moves 2 0 quickly 2 0 wait: setting up a library Facebook presence at the University of Warwick

Of course it’s not just changes at Facebook that will shape our decisions about how much effort we commit to maintaining and developing our public profiles there. How long will Facebook be popular with our target audience? The members of our target audience change all the time: the 18–21-year-old undergraduate today is using Face- book, but what are the current 15–18 year olds using? Anyone under the age of 13 isn’t allowed a Facebook account – what are the 12-year-olds using? And when they get to be 18 and go to university, will they migrate to Facebook or will they stick with what they know … or will there be a whole new set of options open to them that we have never imagined?
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Information quality in Web 2 0

Information quality in Web 2 0

Patterns do not stem from the field of knowledge management. The theory of patterns was developed in the seventies by Christopher Alexander. He published the first patterns in books called: “A Pattern Language” (Alexander, 1977) and “The timeless way of building” (Alexander, 1979). Although he found response in the field of architecture, it was not until the discovery of patterns by the software engineering field that patterns really took off (Gamma et al, 1995). But where Alexander was concerned with living buildings [sic] and good places to live in, Software Architecture was more interested in a practical solution for communicating standard solutions in their field. Today, a shift is taking place towards the more intangible side of Information Systems, as is shown by Till Schuemmer (2005), where he analyzes patterns for social networking. This shift creates room for more focus on living and well-being instead of a practical way to communicate solutions.
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Web 2 0 Programming with Django and TurboGear pdf

Web 2 0 Programming with Django and TurboGear pdf

Kevin: At this juncture, I am no longer the “cat herder.” I stepped down as benevolent dictator at the beginning of 2007. Personal commitments really had to take precedence over TurboGears (as exciting as it all is). Alberto Valverde is the current project leader. I do hang out in the background, and we bounce ideas off each other. In general, though, I can speak to how things have gone historically. Guiding a large open source project is both an interesting thing and different from an enterprise project, where you can count on having a certain level of resources to put against goals. People are often involved mainly to “scratch their own itch.” They may have projects of their own where they are trying to do that, using features of TurboGears that may not be fully robust, and when they realized this, they will work on that portion of the problem only. So you really have to do whatever it takes to foster accomplishment in that environment. You have to, for example, make sure that people feel comfortable asking questions — you have to make the path from framework user, to someone who contributes patches, to framework devel- opers as easy as possible. From the management standpoint, making sure that patches get into the release quickly is key. Over time, you find the people who are exceptionally helpful in moving the proj- ect ahead, and it’s important to smooth the path for them. Unfortunately, you often find that people are able to contribute only sporadically. They may be extremely active for a time and then get moved off by something else in their work life. Happily, though, in a vibrant project, new people often come forward to take their place and so you have to be very comfortable with operating in a fluid and dynamic atmo- sphere. It’s very different from the enterprise, where you have somewhat-known resources, timelines, and feature sets.
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Integration of Collaborative Information Systems in Web 2 0

Integration of Collaborative Information Systems in Web 2 0

A possible solution may be to define an architecture defining a model for integration to combine similar tools and use multiple services to user community to solve this problem. The web technologies such as RSS (Really Simple Syndication)[2], ATOM[3] AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML)[4], microformats[5], and REST (Representational State Transfer)[6] provide flexible Web-accessible data and services for Web 2.0 applications. However, although the current systems are for the most part good, they are independent of each other. Huge amount of data distributed over different tools and services exists in the Web A large fraction of this data is duplicated. What is needed is an integration model that would bridge the different tools and services. In the 90s the software and system releases were not frequent. Now, people don’t careen to know about version of the software and systems. That is not really needed because today’s tools provide services that always improve [1]. There are many tools in Web 2.0 but we are not sure which tools will improve and will be embraced by the web communities. So, in this rapid development cycle one tool might have an advantage to the other tool and vice versa. For example, the annotation tools for scholarly papers are currently detached from the capabilities provided by other research tools.
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Cyberinfrastructure and Web 2 0

Cyberinfrastructure and Web 2 0

The well-known Google Maps application serves as an illustration of many of the principles of rich Internet applications. The Google Maps API provides a high level, object oriented JavaScript library for building interactive maps. These libraries include convenient XML parsers, object representations of maps and overlays, access to additional services such as geo-location services, and other useful utilities. Map images are returned to the user’s browser as tiles fetched from Google Map servers. Unlike older Web map applications, this map fetching is done without direct action by the user (i.e. pushing an “Update Map” button). Rather, new map tiles are returned based on the user’s normal interactions with the system: panning to new areas creates events that result in new map downloads. Google Maps thus illustrates both REST style interfaces (the maps are retrieved using HTTP GET) and rich user interfaces (AJAX/JSON style JavaScript libraries that encapsulate server callbacks). The API also supports simple message formats, as developers can load and parse their own XML data for display on the maps. For a more thorough analysis of the server side of Google maps and how to build a custom tile server, see 22.
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Web 2 0 for E Science Environments

Web 2 0 for E Science Environments

The discussion of Grids is confused by many different definitions. One can use the term Grids in narrow fashion to, for example, require use of Web Services or the Web Service Resource Framework or just call any distributed collection of services as “Broad Grids” which is what we do here. Then one uses the term “Narrow Grid” to refer to any “Broad Grid” implemented using particular technology or for a particular application [3]. One very important Narrow Grid is under design by the Open Grid Service Architecture (OGSA) group in Open Grid Forum [4] and another would be the many mashups using Google maps [5]. Our specific goal in this section is to demonstrate that Web 2.0 provides a comprehensive set of “Narrow Grid” implementations of the core “Broad Grid” concepts that are analogous to OGSA and Enterprise Web Service standards.
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Building a Web based IDE from Web 2  0 perspective

Building a Web based IDE from Web 2 0 perspective

For each opened project. A management tool for the project tree shows the structure of these files. This tree begins with a root which is the project folder. The tool allows managing files and folders on the whole project tree. A right-click on each component displays a menu that contains its options. Two types of menu are available, the first is specific to the folders and the second is specific to files. Another very useful feature is the ability to move a file or folder using drag-and- drop mode .

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Web 2 0 for Grids and e Science

Web 2 0 for Grids and e Science

Grid computing [3], as it is normally defined, is aligned closely with Web Service Architecture principles. The Open Grid Forum’s Open Grid Computing Architecture (OGSA) [4] provides, through a framework of specifications that undergo a community review process, a precise definition of Grid computing. Key capabilities include the management of application execution, data, and information. Security and resource state modeling are examples of cross cutting capabilities in OGSA. Many Grid middleware stacks (Globus, gLite, Unicore, OMII, Willow, Nareji, GOS, and Crown) are available. Web and Grid Services are typically atomic and general purpose. Workflow tools (including languages and execution engines) [5] are used to compose multiple general services into specialized tasks. Collections of users, services, and resources form Virtual Organizations are managed by administrative services. The numerous Web Service specifications that constitute Grids and Web Service systems are commonly called “WS-*”.
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Evaluating recommender systems : an evaluation framework to predict user satisfaction for recommender systems in an electronic programme guide context

Evaluating recommender systems : an evaluation framework to predict user satisfaction for recommender systems in an electronic programme guide context

Since recommender system research began in the mid-1990s many different algorithms for gen- erating recommendations have been developed and nowadays a wide variety of recommender systems exist. This fosters the need for means to evaluate and compare different systems. Recommender system evaluation has proven to be challenging [HKTR04, AT05, HMAC02, ZMKL05] however, since a recommender system’s performance depends on, and is influenced by many factors. Moreover, there is no consensus among researchers on what attributes de- termine the quality of a recommender system and how these attributes should be measured. Some call a recommender system successful when it delivers accurate recommendations, while others utilise user satisfaction as the main indicator of success. In fact over a dozen methods to determine a recommender system’s quality can be identified in the literature [HKTR04]. Furthermore, the data set on which the recommender system operates greatly influences its performance [HKTR04, SKKR01]. A recommender system that performs well on a data set with many users and only a few items may perform worse on a set with a large number of items and much less users. Other examples of data set characteristics that affect a recommender system’s performance are the rating density (number of ratings per user) and the rating scale. Closely related to the first issue is the fact that the goal for which the recommender system is evaluated may differ. The evaluation objective can be to compare two recommendation algorithms with respect to accuracy for example, but one might also be interested in a systems potential to increase sales. Both goals require a completely different evaluation approach and the measurement of different attributes.
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Grids and Web 2 0 supporting eScience

Grids and Web 2 0 supporting eScience

~20 TeraGrid Science Gateways their name for portals OGCE Portal technology effort led by Indiana Uniform approach to access distributed supercomputers supporting single large jobs and s[r]

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Transforming pedagogy using mobile Web 2 0

Transforming pedagogy using mobile Web 2 0

During the course of the year academic teaching staff attended conferences in three overseas countries: Japan, UK, and Spain as well as numerous New Zealand conferences in cities outside of Auckland. Staff used mobile Web 2.0 technologies to share these experiences and stay in contact with their student(s) from these countries and locations. The use of mobile Web 2.0 technologies allowed real time text, video and still images of the conferences, sites, design, and architecture to be easily and immediately uploaded to the staff member’s blog for students to see and share in. The use of instant messaging and blog comments allowed students to remark on the posts, pose questions and request further information on the conference before the end of the visit. The use of mobile Web 2.0 technologies allowed the staff member, his fellow staff members and students to stay in regular contact sharing comments and project concerns: in effect a “virtual studio situation” was created. Upon the staff member’s return, there was no need for time consuming catching up to take place and students were not significantly disadvantaged due to his taking time away from studio teaching.
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Web 2 0, Language Learning and Intercultural Competence

Web 2 0, Language Learning and Intercultural Competence

The language planning issue can be discussed from different perspectives: sociological, linguistic, historical, legal, anthropological, political and economic. Linguists can assess language needs, suggest methods for the standardization and expansion of dictionaries, create didactic material and produce grammar books, writing sys- tems, text-books and dictionaries. Computer experts can provide the necessary support technologies. Educators can develop programmes which satisfy the identified needs of the target, while school systems play a very im- portant role in promoting or reducing language differences. Even the media’s role is not to be underestimated. Indeed films, TV, websites, music and editorial products can all convey language changes or conform to lan- guage standards both at the level of contents, publicity and merchandising. Finally, economics can contribute to the study of language issues through intuitions and conceptual instruments that other disciplines cannot supply.
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Smart Book Recommendation System For Library Books: LibX

Smart Book Recommendation System For Library Books: LibX

Recommender systems are already a huge part of our lives and are tightly integrated into a variety of systems around us. This project not only helped us to enlighten different recommendation techniques by understanding them but also helped to contribute valuable information and data gathered. There are a number of challenges like the cold start problem to face in recommendation systems but the field of recommendation will only get more invaluable to us and help to increase the efficiency of data analysis. Managing trust is of essence and a big data point currently debated in the industry as the data should not be able to personally identify the user and keep his privately identifying information secure. At the same time it should be able to provide enough aggregate data to companies such that they can take the best possible decisions to tailor their products accordingly. The project also helped to create a digital interface and can be used further as a system in our own library which might be helpful to other students in the future as it creates a quality control standard only refining and providing the books which are the best among that subject area.
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Web 2 0 for E Science Environments

Web 2 0 for E Science Environments

Web 2.0 and Grids are addressing a similar application class although Web 2.0 has focused on user interactions So technology has similar requirements Web 2.0 chooses simplicity REST rath[r]

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Web 2 0, Grids and Parallel Computing

Web 2 0, Grids and Parallel Computing

Web 2.0 and Grids are addressing a similar application class although Web 2.0 has focused on user interactions So technology has similar requirements Web 2.0 chooses simplicity REST rath[r]

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Food Labeling and the Consumer's Right to Know: Give the People What They Want

Food Labeling and the Consumer's Right to Know: Give the People What They Want

141. Id. This argument has also been made by the FDA. Interim Guidance on the Voluntary Labeling of Milk in Milk Products from Cows That Have Not Been Treated with Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin, 59 Fed. Reg. 6279 (FDA Feb. 10, 1994). However, this is a dubious argument in light of Tylka v. Gerber, No. 96 C 1647, 1999 WL 495126 (N.D. Ill. 1999). In that case, plaintiffs argued that Gerber’’s claims, including ““Nutritionally, you can't buy a better baby food than Gerber”” were false and misleading advertising, since Gerber was using ingredients, such as starch and sugar, which rendered their products less nutritious than other brands. Id. at *2. The court held:
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Web 2 0, Grids and Parallel Computing

Web 2 0, Grids and Parallel Computing

Service Aggregated Linked Sequential Activities Aims to link parallel and distributed Grid computing by developing parallel applications as services and not as programs or libraries Impr[r]

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Web 2 0 in a Web Services and Grid Context Part I: CTS2007 Web 2 0 Tutorial

Web 2 0 in a Web Services and Grid Context Part I: CTS2007 Web 2 0 Tutorial

Web 2.0 and Grids are addressing a similar application class although Web 2.0 has focused on user interactions So technology has similar requirements Web 2.0 chooses simplicity REST rath[r]

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