Top PDF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF SELF MEDICATION IN SOUTHWEST ETHIOPIA

KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF SELF MEDICATION IN SOUTHWEST ETHIOPIA

KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF SELF MEDICATION IN SOUTHWEST ETHIOPIA

RESULTS: From a total of 403 (100%) participants,95 (45.89%) students practiced self medication in the past two months for commonly perceived illnesses such as headache 35 (36.85%), abdominal pain 29 (30.55%) and cough 33 (23.16%) using mainly analgesics 40(49.38%) and antibiotics 29 (35.80%) mostly from drug retail outlets 88(92.63). Fifty seven (60.00%) respondents can recall the dose, frequency and duration of the medicine while 38 (40%) did not know. Sixty five (68.42%) students agreed to practice self medication irrespective of the seriousness of illnesses.
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ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICE OF SELF-MEDICATION AMONG HARAR HEALTH SCIENCES COLLEGE STUDENTS, HARAR, EASTERN ETHIOPIA

ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICE OF SELF-MEDICATION AMONG HARAR HEALTH SCIENCES COLLEGE STUDENTS, HARAR, EASTERN ETHIOPIA

Results: Out of the total 237 participants 112(36.50%) were males and 125(52.7%) were females. The prevalence of the practice of self-medication was high (70%) with most frequently reported problems being headache and mild pain (47.3) followed by GI problem (30.8%) and eye and ear symptoms (29.1%). Most of the respondents (55.7 %) read leaflet and 34.6 % of the respondents had some knowledge about the definition of self-medication. The two main reasons for self-medication were knowledge gain (37.6%) and time saving (28.7%). Antibiotic (47%) and pain killer (37%) were the two most frequently consumed medications. Previous prescriptions (33.9%) followed by Pharmacist/druggist (24.6%) were the two most frequently reported source of drug information for self-medication in this study. Besides, 70% of the respondents agreed with the practice of self-medication in the present study. There were statistically significant differences between respondents who reported practicing self-medication based on study year (p<0.05). Most respondents had positive attitude towards self-medication and antibiotics were the drugs most commonly used for self-medication without a prescription despite the fact that they were aware of the risk of development of antimicrobial resistance.
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A Questionnaire Based Study Regarding the Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Self-Medication Among Second Year Undergraduate Medical Students

A Questionnaire Based Study Regarding the Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Self-Medication Among Second Year Undergraduate Medical Students

Background: Self-medication is becoming very common in our routine life which is an unhealthy and risky practice. Present study was done to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of self-medication among second year undergraduate medical students of a private medical college in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. Material and methods: A pre-validated questionnaire was prepared and distributed among the students.Data was collected and analysed using Microsoft Excel and the results expressed as counts and percentages. Results: Total 139 students participated in the study voluntarily and most common reason for taking Self-medication was that there was no need to visit the doctor for minor illness. In maximum students, source of information of the drugs used for Self-medication was previous prescription and source of the drugs was medical store. Only 39% MBBS students accepted the fact, that they always visited a qualified practitioner whenever they fell ill. Most of the students took Self-medication for headache followed by cough, cold and fever. Out of total 139 students, most of the students took NSAIDS as Self-medication followed by lozenges. Conclusion: This study showed that students of second year MBBS after studying pharmacology became more aware about the drugs and hence do not hesitate in taking Self-medication which is a wrong practice. Key words: Self-medication, Questionnaire, Second Year MBBS, Knowledge, Attitude, Practice.
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 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF SELF-MEDICATION IN COLLEGE STUDENTS

 KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF SELF-MEDICATION IN COLLEGE STUDENTS

Self-medication is a common practice worldwide and the irrational use of the drugs is a major cause of concern. Self-medication is an issue with serious global implication. The current study aimed to determine the Knowledge, Attitude and Behavior of self-medication in college students. The Study site was Faculty of Engineering and Technology, (Engineering and Pharmacy department) Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar, Tamil Nadu. The Study design was consisting of Cross sectional study. The total study population was 100 students (respondents), in the students 50 from Pharmacy (healthcare students) and other 50 from engineering students (non-healthcare students). Total study period of six months. All the data were collected by questionnaire, it was containing 30 questions both open and closed type questions. The questions were distributed to 50 healthcare and 50 non-healthcare students for getting information regarding self-medication. Since inappropriate self-medication has the potential to cause serious harm, not only to students themselves but also to those whom they suggest medication. Prevalence of self-medication was high due to minor illness. However, there is no significant association between prevalence and gender of respondents. Health care students are more awareness about self-medication. It helps to conduct counseling programs about the potential risk of self-medication, which can help to prevent the harms of un-prescribed medication.
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A COMPARATIVE CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY ON KNOWLEDGE ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE TOWARDS SELF-MEDICATION PRACTICES AMONG RURAL AND URBAN POPULATION OF FIELD PRACTICE AREAS OF S.N.MEDICAL COLLEGE BAGALKOT-NORTH KARNATAKA

A COMPARATIVE CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY ON KNOWLEDGE ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE TOWARDS SELF-MEDICATION PRACTICES AMONG RURAL AND URBAN POPULATION OF FIELD PRACTICE AREAS OF S.N.MEDICAL COLLEGE BAGALKOT-NORTH KARNATAKA

Background: Self-medication is widely used by young adults. Self-medication is more of a risk than remedy. It is a potential contributor to pathogen resistance to antibiotics. Self-medication is an emerging threat to Indian healthcare system. Objectives: To analyze (1) The reasons and source for self-medication practice. (2) Diseases for which self-medication is commonly used. (3) Knowledge, Attitude and practice towards self-medication practices. Methods: This comparative cross-sectional study was carried out to analyze the knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding self-medication among rural and urban field practice areas of Department of Community Medicine, SN Medial College, Bagalkot, Karnataka, India among230 adults in 18-59yrs age group, 115 each, from rural and urban areas. Results: 60 % of urban and 75% of rural participants’ major source of information was pharmacist. In urban majority preferred self-medication as their immediate response when they fell sick and rural sample population preferred consulting a pharmacist. Self-medication is always the first line of treatment for (62%). Modern medicine was the most preferred treatment modality in urban (86%) and rural (96%) respectively. 59% of urban population opted for self-medication,1-2 days after they fell sick; whereas immediately, in rural population. Majority of urban (82.6%) and rural (71.3%) participants took self-medication for 1 – 2 days. Conclusion: The primary factor which influenced the choice of self-medication is quick relief, practiced more in rural population due to inadequate health care services in rural area. Government should provide proper instructions to the pharmacist to supply drugs only on prescription.
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Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Self Medication: A Cross-sectional Study among Yemeni Health Profession Students

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Self Medication: A Cross-sectional Study among Yemeni Health Profession Students

Self-medication habits were common among first year students of faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Aden University in Yemen. An urgent and rapid intervention should be made to promote health awareness of the self-medication among students because the percentages of using antibiotics and other classes of medicines are alarming. Students must be educated about the potential hazard of using medicines without physician advices and their serious adverse reactions. The Ministry of Health and Population must enact laws regulating the dispensing of medicines from pharmacies
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Knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptive among women who seek abortion care at Jimma University specialized hospital, southwest Ethiopia

Knowledge, attitude and practice of emergency contraceptive among women who seek abortion care at Jimma University specialized hospital, southwest Ethiopia

dosing and time interval between the doses (which is 2 and 12 hours respectively). These study findings were comparable study from Adigrat in Ethiopia from the total 902 patients, only, 11 patients had the knowledge of emergency contraception (1.2%) in addition, and only 3 patients were given emergency contraceptive after forced sexual intercourse (2.4%) [15]. None of them used emergency contraceptive. This is unlike with a study done on 774 students at Addis Ababa University, about 43.5% [95% CI, 40.0-47.0%] of the students said that they have heard about emergency contraception, 279 (82.8%) depict pills and 115 (34.1%) intrauterine contraceptives. About 53% [95% CI 4.19% [95%CI 3.1 -6.4%] respondents reported that they had used emer- gency contraceptive methods previously [12]. And still the result is much less when compared to study done in Nigeria among female undergraduates where 58% of respondents had heard of a product that could be used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex. Of the 510 woman who were aware of emergency contraception only 18% correctly identified 72 hrs at the limit time for the method ’ s use [6]. This difference could be attributed to higher proportion of rural population 41 (46.1%), less literacy level 22 (24.7%) and less number of study popu- lation. Place of origin, literacy level, and religion, shows a significant association between knowledge of emer- gency contraceptive. However, occupational status, pre- vious history of contraceptive use have slight association [p = 0.05].
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Impacts of counseling on knowledge, attitude and practice of medication use during pregnancy

Impacts of counseling on knowledge, attitude and practice of medication use during pregnancy

Remarkable percentage of pregnant women in this study have shown positive attitude towards medication use during pregnancy. More than 75.6% of the partici- pants replied that they should have asked about their complications and medicines with physician or pharma- cist. Patients also had a habit of self medication (64.2%), but majority stopped such habit when they knew that they were pregnant. A higher percentage has been re- ported in a study in Nigeria where 72.4% of pregnant participants were found to have the habit of self medica- tion [7]. Likewise another study also suggests that use of OTC medications was quite common during pregnancy Table 4 Baseline attitude score mean rank according to
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Prevalence and Public Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Traditional Medicine in Al-Aziziah, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Prevalence and Public Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Traditional Medicine in Al-Aziziah, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

The present study estimated the epidemiological trend and explored public knowledge, attitude and practice of traditional medicine. In addition, this research determined associations between sociodemographic features of participants with health problems and herbal preparations, cautery, bone setting and other traditional therapies in Riyadh city. The results of this research showed that about 20% of patients (22% males and 18% females) seek TM which is consistent with other studies conducted in Riyadh [18,25]. The studies conducted after 1993 reported that about 17% -72.8% of participants with chronic diseases used CAM therapies, which included dietary interventions and non- vitamin/non-mineral dietary supplements, nutritional supplements, herbal medicines, spiritual healing, naturopathy, manipulative-body based therapy, energy therapy, and relaxation techniques [28,29,32,45,46]. In our recent study, 30.5% of the participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus used CAM therapies mostly herbs, cupping, and nutritional supplements. Most of them were adults (51.6±10.6) and the number of females (56.6%) was slightly higher than males [27]. In our another study involving 208 participants (mothers=61, their medical student daughters=147), 28.8% of them auto-used herbs for skin diseases, 58.6% of them used TM for common cold, 68.7% used TM for any forms of illness and 39.5% of participants used TM for cosmetic purpose [26]. According to this study, the self-medication of TM including OTC drugs and herbs was 7.3%. The self-medication of TM including over-the-counter drugs and herbal preparations, dietary supplements and conventional medications such as antibiotics globally varies across many studies, (up to 82% use CAM therapies) and this practice is
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MEDICATION KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE (KAP)  AMONG UNIVERSITY OF GONDAR FRESHMAN STUDENTS,  NORTH WESTERN ETHIOPIA

MEDICATION KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE (KAP) AMONG UNIVERSITY OF GONDAR FRESHMAN STUDENTS, NORTH WESTERN ETHIOPIA

Inadequate knowledge of medication use may directly lead to misuse by community and/or patients’ non compliance with a drug regimen and results in serious outcomes like adverse drug reaction and reduction of the quality of treatment. Thus this study intended to assess knowledge, attitude and practices toward medication use of freshman students of University of Gondar. A cross sectional study was undertaken on 400 freshman students of University of Gondar in May 2007. The sample was taken from each faculty using systematic random sampling method. Three section of questionnaire were developed including 13 true false questions to measure knowledge, 5 questions for attitude in a 5 point scale, and 10 questions for medication practice in 5 point scale. A total of 400 students completed the survey instruments. Knowledge of students on duration of therapy of antihypertensive, drug interaction with antacids, frequency of medication taking and storage condition of ointment or gel and syrup was poor, answered correctly less than 34.1% of the respondents. On the other hand 86.5% of respondents were knowledgeable about taking medicine with food, drinks- tea or alcohol will interfere with the effect of medicine. Respondents have good attitude on trustworthiness of a pharmacist as a consultant of drug information (94%), necessity of dispensing and consultation of medicine by pharmacist (94.5%) and necessity of consultation on unusual effects of the medication by pharmacist (89.7%). On medication practice, 74% of the respondents intended to self-medication on minor aliments like colds; and few respondents usually practice sharing their medicine to others (14%) and use of traditional medicine with western medicine in combination (6%). The majority of the students have better attitude in getting consultation related to medication by pharmacist rather than deciding by themselves or peers but lack appropriate knowledge and practices related to safe use of medication. Hence, intervention is required towards improving drug knowledge and safe medication practice.
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Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Self-Medication Among Basic Science Undergraduate Medical Students in a Medical School in Western Nepal

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Manipal College of Medical Sciences (MCOMS), Pokhara, Nepal is the first private medical school in Nepal and admits 150 students annually mainly from Nepal, India, Sri Lanka, and Maldives to the undergraduate medical (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MBBS) course. The course is divided into two years (four semesters) of integrated basic sciences, two and half years of clinical sciences, and one year compulsory residential rotating internship. During the integrated basic sciences the six subjects (Anatomy, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pathology, Pharmacology and Physiology) are taught in an integrated organ system-based manner along with Community Medicine and Introduction to Clinical Medicine (ICM). A hybrid approach of didactic lectures, problem based learning (PBL), and practical sessions are used [11]. There is a paucity of studies on self-medication among basic science medical students in Nepal. Hence the study was planned with the following objectives: 1) to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of self-medication among second and fourth semester basic science undergraduate medical students; and 2) to study differences in
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KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS TOWARDS ADVERSE DRUG REACTION REPORTING AT INPATIENT WARDS OF TERTIARY HOSPITAL, ETHIOPIA

KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS TOWARDS ADVERSE DRUG REACTION REPORTING AT INPATIENT WARDS OF TERTIARY HOSPITAL, ETHIOPIA

Self-administer questionnaire was distributed to 280 HCPs working at inpatient wards of TASH. Among HCPs initially approached, only 213 HCPs adequately filled and returned the questionnaires, giving a response rate of 76.1 %. Hence, 213 HCPs were considered for analysis. Females comprised 54% of the respondents. Most of the respondents were in the age range of 26-35 years, which accounted for 51.1%. Nurses comprised the major type of HCPs included in the study accounted for 75.6% of the respondents. Majority, 192(90.1%) of the respondents were bachelor degree holders. One hundred twenty two (57.3%) HCPs were having a clinical experience of 1-5 years (Table 1).
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Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Regarding Therapeutic Communication among Nurses in Selected Government Hospitals in Oromia, Western Ethiopia, 2016

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Regarding Therapeutic Communication among Nurses in Selected Government Hospitals in Oromia, Western Ethiopia, 2016

Abstract: Communication takes a special form in care and cure aspect which is totally different from the social communication or personal communication. Thus, the this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice regarding therapeutic communication among nurses in selected Governmental Hospitals in Oromia, Western Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study design was employed to collect data by structured self-administered questionnaire from 169 nurses working in hospitals in Oromia, Western Ethiopia and analyzed by SPSS version 20. About 83.3% of study participants have good knowledge, 72.2% of study participants have positive attitude and 75.8% of nurses utilize therapeutic communication. Majority of study participants have good knowledge and positive attitude regarding therapeutic communication.
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Self-medication practice in Ethiopia: a systematic review

Self-medication practice in Ethiopia: a systematic review

Drugs used in self-medication were mostly obtained from drug-retail outlets (66.6%), shops (10.3%), relatives/friends (9.3%), and left over from previous use (6.5%). According to the current study, more than 10% of self-medication users in Ethiopia take drugs from shops. This is another important issue that needs due attention. Drugs should not be allowed to be present in shops, since they need special storage conditions, special handling, and advice from a pharmacy professional who is knowledgeable on dispensing. Even though Ethiopian law forbids the availability of drugs in shops, the implementation of regulation is weak. Ethiopian food, medicine, and health care control authorities need to enforce this law more judiciously.
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ture of the topic and its sensitivity. Attempt was made to minimize this by framing questions to show that it was okay to answer in a way that was not so- cially desirable. The convenience sampling technique we used could introduce bias and the sampling frame was not known. The results should therefore be inter- preted cautiously in terms of generalizability. Self- reporting is a gross overestimation of reality. Conclusions: Healthcare practitioners in Jimma, Ethiopia support the discontinuation of FGM/C through their attitudes to educate patients. However, the majority of HCPs feel their FGM/C medical training has been inadequate. The respondents who felt they received sufficient medical training on the topic were more likely to discuss FGM/C with their patients, although their knowledge was no greater than their peers. This suggests that perceived training about the practice increases the likelihood a practitio- ner will discuss FGM/C with a patient even if the information disclosed is inaccurate. Male-female dialogue about FGM/C is a major barrier to abolish- ing FGM/C. For future interventions, it is imperative to educate HCPs, particularly males, on FGM/C in order to promote greater dialogue between the male HCPs and female patients. Open dialogue may serve to reduce lack of awareness and poor communication to ensure that the prevailing social expectations around FGM/C are challenged.
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Cultural Assessment: A Study of Midwives’ Knowledge, Attitude and Self-reported Practice in Uganda

Cultural Assessment: A Study of Midwives’ Knowledge, Attitude and Self-reported Practice in Uganda

A cross-sectional study conducted in Ethiopia of 274 maternal health care providers revealed that nearly 10% of the health workers did not know the greeting style of women they were serving and had limited proficiency of key words and phrases of the women’s native language that could facilitate health care delivery. Furthermore, 21.2% of the participants did not allow a woman in labour to pray, even when there was a request to do so, 33.9% restricted mothers from lying supine during delivery, 35% of respondents would only allow women to give birth on a bed, and 77% did not feel comfortable in asking a client’s ethnic background. In addition, 69.3% of the participants never sought women’s wishes around disposal of the placenta. Forty one percent of the participants did not agree with incorporating cultural considerations in their clinical service. 10
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KNOWLEDGE ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF MOTHERS IN CHILD BEARING AGE TOWARDS INSTITUTIONAL DELIVERY IN ADABA TOWN SOUTHEAST   ETHIOPIA

KNOWLEDGE ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE OF MOTHERS IN CHILD BEARING AGE TOWARDS INSTITUTIONAL DELIVERY IN ADABA TOWN SOUTHEAST ETHIOPIA

This community based cross sectional study attempts to assess knowledge, attitude and practice 0f mothers in child bearing age towards institutional delivery in Adaba town, Ethiopia. The overall practice of institutional delivery of last child in our study is 58.3% which is higher when compared to the study done in Kenya (42%), SSA (47%) and Asia (40%) [23, 6]. Also it is very higher when compared to national level institutional delivery (10.8%) according to EDHS 2011[12]. This difference could be due to increased facility of health services as time goes and because of our research conducted within the town. This study revealed that out of 242 mothers in reproductive age group, 212(87.6%) have knowledge and 218(90.1%) have positive attitude towards institutional delivery. According to this study monthly income has strong association with institutional delivery. As the monthly income increases above poverty line (700birr), more mothers were more likely to deliver at health institution (chi-square=18.416, p=0.000) [14]. This is because of the reason that mothers can afford the cost of health service and transportation as their income level becomes higher. Study conducted in south west Ethiopia shows that, family with low monthly income (below 100birr per month) tends to use health institutional delivery at lower proportion 17].
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“Self-Medication Practice among Albanian Students of Medical Sciences” by Rezarta Shkreli, Klodiola Dhamo Afrim Tabaku, Albania.

“Self-Medication Practice among Albanian Students of Medical Sciences” by Rezarta Shkreli, Klodiola Dhamo Afrim Tabaku, Albania.

Self medication is one of the most practiced worldwide issues and can cause both benefits and also side effects at a time, when if it is not properly mentored by drug experts. The aim of the survey was to determine the prevalence, knowledge and practice of self medication among students of an Albanian Medical University. A cross-sectional survey on self-medication was conducted among students of medical sciences, with a standardized questionnaire distributed to a total of 250 students attending third – fifth year of pharmacy and dentistry as well as first - third year of nursery. The prevalence of self-medication has resulted 79.3%. Principal morbidities for seeking self-medication were headache 31.49%, flu/cold/cough 39.39% and fever 23.76%. Regarding the major reasons for seeking self-medication, previous experience with health problem 45.86%, mild illness 35.91%, knowledge about the drug and disease 18.23% and self decision 15.47%. The most used medicines were NSAIDs (analgesics and antipyretics) 44.19%, antibiotics 34.81%, and antihistamines 13.26%. According to this survey the source of information for self medication were previous experience 35.6%, previous prescription 34.7% and consulting with pharmacists 17.1%. Prevalence of self-medication has resulted high in the students included in this survey. There is an urgent need to enforce the law on over the counter drug sale and to educate the youth to ensure safe practices.
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Assessment of Knowledge and Practice of the Community towards Malaria and its Treatment in Jiren Kebele, Jimma Town Oromia, Ethiopia

Assessment of Knowledge and Practice of the Community towards Malaria and its Treatment in Jiren Kebele, Jimma Town Oromia, Ethiopia

Despite the continually intervention efforts which includes drug distribution and intra domestic insecticide spray for the last 30 years; the prevalence of malaria in Ethiopia is very high. Decreasing sensitivity of parasite to chloroquine and decreased susceptibility of vectors to DDT are known to be the major contributing factors. In addition to this the failure of mosquito control program may have resulted from insufficient knowledge of local malaria vector and there ecology and behavior. Such knowledge would permit a better understanding of malaria transmission in order to optimize control strategies aimed at reducing man vector contact (10, 21).
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Assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practices toward prevention of hepatitis B virus infection among students of medicine and health sciences in Northwest Ethiopia

Assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practices toward prevention of hepatitis B virus infection among students of medicine and health sciences in Northwest Ethiopia

Hepatitis B virus infection can be prevented by adher- ing to universal precautions including the use of pro- tective barriers like gloves, proper sterilization of medical equipment, proper hospital wastes management system and vaccination [18–21]. Moreover, post-expo- sure prophylaxis can be used as a means of HBV preven- tion after accidental exposure to contaminated blood or body fluids [18–20]. However, studies have indicated that there is a clear gap of knowledge among trainees of health profession towards the risks of occupational expo- sure to HBV infection. A study from Lao democratic People’s Republic (Lao DPR), for example, has indicated that 86.5 % of medical students had poor knowledge on modes of HBV transmission and risk perception [22]. A similar study from Cameroon has indicated poor practice among the study participants, with only 10  % vaccina- tion rate against HBV, and 55.9 % accidental exposure to blood [23].
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