Top PDF Linear Algebra, Theory And Applications

Linear Algebra, Theory And Applications

Linear Algebra, Theory And Applications

The linear transformation, F in this context is called the deformation gradient and it describes the local deformation of the material. Thus it is possible to consider this deformation in terms of two processes, one which distorts the material and the other which just rotates it. It is the matrix U which is responsible for stretching and compressing. This is why in continuum mechanics, the stress is often taken to depend on U which is known in this context as the right Cauchy Green strain tensor. This process of writing a matrix as a product of two such matrices, one of which preserves distance and the other which distorts is also important in applications to geometric measure theory an interesting field of study in mathematics and to the study of quadratic forms which occur in many applications such as statistics. Here I am emphasizing the application to mechanics in which the eigenvectors of U determine the principle directions, those directions in which the material is stretched or compressed to the maximum extent.
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Student Reactions to Learning Theory Based Curriculum Materials in Linear Algebra – A Survey Analysis

Student Reactions to Learning Theory Based Curriculum Materials in Linear Algebra – A Survey Analysis

This paper adds another dimension to the LINE project body of work. The authors have successfully facilitated an effective collaboration of mathematics, computer science and education faculty who used the LINE framework to design and implement a variety of modules in different linear algebra course settings (Cooley et al., 2014; Martin et al., 2010; Cooley et al., 2007). They were able to collaborate to develop instructional strategies and materials that had a positive impact on student mathematical learning and attitudes. Faculty and students have reported beliefs about the benefits of these new environments in their linear algebra courses: They not only said that conceptual learning took place, but also expressed positive impressions about the modules, their interactions with others in the class, and their broader mathematical experiences. The authors are convinced by this research that a course development framework that integrates research-based education theory with core mathematics content in the undergraduate curriculum can be implemented widely by teams of STEM and education faculty and is not limited to linear algebra (See also Arnon et al., 2013; Asiala et al., 1996).
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Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications

Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications

This text is intended for a one or two-semester undergraduate course in abstract algebra. Traditionally, these courses have covered the theoretical aspects of groups, rings, and fields. However, with the development of computing in the last several decades, applications that involve abstract algebra and discrete mathematics have become increasingly important, and many science, engineering, and computer science students are now electing to minor in mathematics. Though theory still occupies a central role in the subject of abstract algebra and no student should go through such a course without a good notion of what a proof is, the importance of applications such as coding theory and cryptography has grown significantly. Until recently most abstract algebra texts included few if any applications. However, one of the major problems in teaching an abstract algebra course is that for many students it is their first encounter with an environment that requires them to do rigorous proofs. Such students often find it hard to see the use of learning to prove theorems and propositions; applied examples help the instructor provide motivation.
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PROBLEM-SOLVING APPLICATIONS OF GROUP THEORY IN MODERN ALGEBRA: A STUDY

PROBLEM-SOLVING APPLICATIONS OF GROUP THEORY IN MODERN ALGEBRA: A STUDY

Groups are vital for modern algebra; Its basic structure can be found in many mathematical phenomena. Groups can be found in geometry, which represent phenomena such as symmetry and some types of transformations. Group theory has applications in physics, chemistry and computer science, and even puzzles such as the Rubik's Cube can be represented using group theory. In this extended summary, we give the definition of a group and several theorems in group theory. We also have several important examples of groups, namely the permutation group and the symmetry group, together with their applications.Group theory, in modern algebra, the study of groups, which are systems that comprise of a set of components and a binary operation that can be connected to two components of the set, which together fulfill certain adages.
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An Asynchronous API for Numerical Linear Algebra

An Asynchronous API for Numerical Linear Algebra

Using graphics processors to accelerate non-graphical applications is a field that has gained in popularity, see e.g., www.gpgpu.org and Owens et. al. [25]. One of the main bottlenecks with such use of the GPU is the relatively slow data bus between GPU and main memory. Heterogeneous processor designs such as the Cell BE and the coming AMD Fusion processors remove this bottleneck by incorporating accelerator cores on the same silicon die as the CPU. It is commonly accepted that using such accelerator cores outperform pure CPU implementations for a variety of processing tasks. See for instance Brodtkorb et. al. [9] for an example of a comparison between multi-core CPUs, the GPU, and the Cell BE.
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Graph Coloring Using Linear Algebra

Graph Coloring Using Linear Algebra

The classical problem in Combinatorics and Graph Theory of coloring the vertices of a given graph properly using a prescribed number of colors, is considered. This paper describes an application of elementary linear algebra over a finite field of order q to this problem, where q is the number of available colors.

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On Linear Algebra for Non Mathematics  Majors

On Linear Algebra for Non Mathematics Majors

Linear algebra originated in 18th Century. Until 1950’s, it was only studied by mathematics students and some graduate students of other areas. But after 1960, it was included in the undergraduate curriculum of the non Ma- thematics Departments of American Universities. In China, the engineering departments offered no linear alge- bra until 1980s. Why is linear algebra so popular in recent decades? The most fundamental reason is that it is the basis of many algorithms for the machine implementation of numerous technical problems. In Prof. Leontiff’s work leading to the 1973 economics Nobel Prize, he used computer to solve the 42-th order of linear equation group. In early 80’s, linear algebra software package LINPACK was developed. So users can solve the problem of large complex linear algebra without mastering the mathematical details of matrix theory. LINPACK is also the background support of MATLAB. The achievements of linear algebra in the last half of the 20th century also focused on solving the problems of large-scale matrix using computer. It is no longer a pure theory of mathe- matics but becomes a calculation tool for common engineering students.
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A Computational Introduction to Number Theory and Algebra

A Computational Introduction to Number Theory and Algebra

Another model of computation is that of Boolean circuits. In this model of computation, one considers families of Boolean circuits (with, say, the usual “and,” “or,” and “not” gates) that compute a particular function — for every input length, there is a di ff erent circuit in the family that computes the function on inputs that are bit strings of that length. One natural notion of complexity for such circuit families is the size of the circuit (i.e., the number of gates and wires in the circuit), which is measured as a function of the input length. For many years, the smallest known Boolean circuit that multiplies two integers of length at most ` was of size O( ` len( ` ) len(len( ` ))). This result was due to Schönhage and Strassen [86]. More recently, Fürer showed how to reduce this to O( ` len( ` )2 O(log ∗ ` ) ) [38]. Here, the value of log ∗ n is defined as the minimum number of applications of the function log 2 to the number n required to obtain a number that is less than or equal to 1. The function log ∗ is an extremely slow growing function, and is a constant for all practical purposes.
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A Study of Linear Algebra for Computer Vision

A Study of Linear Algebra for Computer Vision

Camera modeling is important parts of computer vision. A camera model is a mathematical projection between a 3D object space and a 2D image. These models can be used for calculating the geometric information from the images [10]. On the basis of parameters, there are various types of camera model but most generally only pinhole camera model is used in academic research and many applications. The pinhole model, assumes that camera rays pass via a single point, the optical center and linear relationship will occur between image point position and associated camera ray’s direction [10].
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Topics in Randomized Numerical Linear Algebra

Topics in Randomized Numerical Linear Algebra

One of the most general tools in the nonasymptotic theory toolbox is the Noncommutative Khintchine Inequality (NCKI), which bounds the moments of the norm of a sum of randomly signed matrices [ LPP91 ] . Despite its power and generality, the NCKI is unwieldy. To use it, one must reduce the problem to a suitable form by applying symmetrization and decoupling arguments and exploiting the equivalence between moments and tail bounds. It is often more convenient to apply the NCKI in the guise of a lemma, due to Rudelson [ Rud99 ] , that provides an analog of the law of large numbers for sums of rank-one matrices. This result has found many applications, including column-subset selection [ RV07 ] and the fast approximate solution of least-squares problems [ DMMS11 ] . The NCKI and its corollaries do not always yield sharp results because parasitic logarithmic factors arise in many settings.
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Sketching as a Tool for Numerical Linear Algebra

Sketching as a Tool for Numerical Linear Algebra

chapter. This also turns out to have a number of applications, for ex- ample to CUR decompositions of a matrix discussed in §4.2. Note that this way of constructing subspace embeddings is desirable in that it gives an actual “representative” subset of rows of A which form a sub- space embedding - this is often called a coreset. Such representations can sometimes lead to better data interpretability, as well as preserving sparsity. While we do discuss this kind of sampling to some extent, our main focus will be on sketching. The reader is encouraged to look at the survey by Mahoney for more details on sampling-based approaches [85]. See also [78] and [31] for state of the art subspace embeddings based on this approach.
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Further Study on Luo Shu by Linear Algebra

Further Study on Luo Shu by Linear Algebra

and New Zealand. Because of this, the practice of Feng Shui has therefore become more popular in the southern hemisphere. Many Feng Shui masters, however, began to discover that problems or inaccuracies arose when conventional Feng Shui rules of the northern hemisphere were directly applied in southern locations. Obviously, such considerations were not included in any classical Feng Shui literature because all the ancient Feng Shui masters had cultivated their craft in Mainland China which is in the northern hemisphere. Thus, a new theory and a new method was proposed by these masters.
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Differentially  Private  Linear  Algebra  in  the  Streaming  Model

Differentially Private Linear Algebra in the Streaming Model

Our mechanism for LRA can be easily compiled to give differentially private principal component analy- sis using standard algorithms that use LRA in the first step. Another important application of our mechanism for private sketch generation is in manifold learning. We do not formally state these mechanisms as there are standard algorithms for these applications that only use private matrix for one of the problems stated above and rest of the steps are deterministic function of these computations. One can also implement our mecha- nisms as distributed algorithms, a desirable feature as argued by [3]. This is because every operations used in our mechanism have efficient distributed algorithms–Jacobi method for singular value decomposition [42, Chapter 4], Cannon’s algorithm for multiplication [10], and GMRES for residual method [53].
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Some aspects of Leibniz algebra theory

Some aspects of Leibniz algebra theory

The Leibniz algebras appeared to be naturally related to several areas such as differential geometry, homological algebra, classical algebraic topology, algebraic K-theory, loop spaces, non-commutative geometry, and so on. They found some applications in physics (see, for example, [16, 23, 24]). The theory of Leibniz algebras has been developing quite intensively but un-even. On one hand, some analogues of important results from the theory of Lie algebras were proven. On the other hand, natural questions about the structure of Leibniz algebras are not considered. For example, until very recently, the cyclic subalgebras of Leibniz algebras were not fully described. In this survey, we want to gather and to systematize the main results that clarify to some extent the structure of Leibniz algebras. We will not touch issues related to the study of homological problems, we will not focus on the connections of Leibniz algebras, as well as issues related to the applications of Leibniz algebras. Note, that most of the results obtained to date relate to finite dimensional algebras. We will try to focus on the overall results, i.e. the results that hold for both finite dimensional and infinite dimensional algebras. Our goal is to see which parts of the picture involving the general structure of Leibniz algebras have already been drawn, and this will allow us to see which parts of this picture should be drawn further. Many results on of Lie algebras are practically unchanged carried over to Leibniz algebras. But we would like to draw attention not to results of this kind, but to results showing the differences between Leibniz algebras and Lie algebras.
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On semisimple algebra codes: generator theory

On semisimple algebra codes: generator theory

Remark 1. Note that there is no need of computing the Gr¨ obner basis of I, it arises from the multiplication table of the algebra A. Moreover, the construction depends on the base B but we can rebuild easily the Gr¨ obner basis when there is a change of the base of the algebra by linear algebra techniques (see [17]), so we can always suppose that the code is taken as a subalgebra that is generated by some of the elements of the base B. Example 2. We will use the following “toy example” for understanding the theory during the paper, consider the finite field F 5 and the algebra
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L(Infinity) Algebra Representation Theory.

L(Infinity) Algebra Representation Theory.

Given a vector space V , the general linear algebra gl(V ) is very concrete in the sense that the bracket is ultimately computed through matrix multiplication. When a more abstract but finite dimensional Lie algebra is associated with gl(V ) through a structure-preserving map, much can be told about it via this concrete nature. In fact, for F = R or C , this is always true; by Ado’s theorem [4], for some finite dimensional vector space V , L is isomorphic to a subalgebra of gl(V ).

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Research on Boolean Algebra to Switching Theory

Research on Boolean Algebra to Switching Theory

The latter feature is actually the foundation for engineering applications of the Boolean algebra. Boole also discussed probability theory, however, other logic parts are mainly the same. The underlying idea of his work was to reduce the logical thought to solving of equations. The algebraic operations have been defined to correspond to the basic activities while reasoning. In terms of these operations Boole formulated in an algebraic structure that shares essential properties of both set operations and logic operations. The work was done independently of other works by logicians and mathematicians at that time. For instance, the results by Augustus De Morgan were not used, since Boole did not consider conjunction and disjunction as a pair of dual operations.The approach followed by Boole and his point of view to the subject is possibly best described by himself.
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Linear Algebra – A Powerful Tool for Data Science

Linear Algebra – A Powerful Tool for Data Science

Analysis of data is an important task in data managements systems. Many mathematical tools are used in data analysis. A new division of data management has appeared in machine learning, linear algebra, an optimal tool to analyse and manipulate the data. Data science is a multi- disciplinary subject that uses scientific methods to process the structured and unstructured data to extract the knowledge by applying suitable algorithms and systems. The strength of linear algebra is ignored by the researchers due to the poor understanding. It powers major areas of Data Science including the hot fields of Natural Language Processing and Computer Vision. The data science enthusiasts finding the programming languages for data science are easy to analyze the big data rather than using mathematical tools like linear algebra. Linear algebra is a must- know subject in data science. It will open up possibilities of working and manipulating data. In this paper, some applications of Linear Algebra in Data Science are explained.
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Linear Algebra Based Generalization of the Kennelly's Theorem

Linear Algebra Based Generalization of the Kennelly's Theorem

Abstract The Kennelly theorem which is widely used in three phase systems allows for the delta-star and star-delta conversion and simplification of several electronic circuits. In the present work, we propose a generalization based on the theorem of superposition and some results of linear algebra. Our demonstration is inspired from the proof of the classical Kennelly’s theorem. The proposed formulas are very clear and simple. This will make it possible to convert polygon-start and star -polygon if the number of impedances is odd, greater than or equals three. The advantage of our proposal is that it could be understood and programmed easily by undergraduate student when compared to other methods based on the graph theory, which focuses mainly on the mesh-star conversion, which is not possible in all configurations in both ways. This result can be applied to reduce the number of nodes in circuit type models of electrical components and electronic circuits. Thus, the simulation time is reduced.
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Black Box Linear Algebra with the LinBox Library

Black Box Linear Algebra with the LinBox Library

CHAPTER 5. LINBOX DESIGN 147 At a lower level, our code must operate over many coefficient domains. A user must even be able to easily change the implementation of a given coefficient domain. For instance, one might plug any of several implementations of the integers modulo a prime number into our code. We might want to use Victor Shoup’s Number Theory Library (NTL) class ZZ_p, which implements the field using arbitrary length integers and residue arithmetic [shoup.net], or we might want to use an implementation that performs the field operations through Zech logarithm tables. We might also plug in a field of rational functions. We might or even use floating point numbers, although the resulting methods may not be numerically stable. We can capture many future improvements on field arithmetic without rewriting our programs. At very, stage we have applied the principle of generic or reusable programming.
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