Top PDF Living in Place: A Study of Vitality through Sense of Place

Living in Place: A Study of Vitality through Sense of Place

Living in Place: A Study of Vitality through Sense of Place

These observations of Maplewood, Park Avenue and Pittsford lead to many conclusions about each case study and the extent to which their attributes engage our aging population in a way that stimulates interaction, builds a sense of purpose, and fosters a spirit of belonging. Such conclusions, however, are relevant only if they tie to the demographics of each community and the needs and priorities expressed by residents, as set forth in the early stages of this thesis. It is somewhat straightforward to step back and assess these communities from the standpoint of a generic approach. For example, it is generally understood that social interaction is healthy, both physically and mentally, for all members of society (not just the elderly), regardless of their demographic makeup, and that connections such as a pattern of streets or sidewalks can help to fulfill this need. The more difficult task is to assess whether the attributes of each community can in fact lead to the model of Living in Place that this thesis proposes, with respect to the particular needs, priorities and overall social conditions of the respective residents and the elderly in particular.
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The Effects of Gentrification on Residents’ Sense of Place and Group Cohesion: A Study of Pittsburgh Neighborhoods

The Effects of Gentrification on Residents’ Sense of Place and Group Cohesion: A Study of Pittsburgh Neighborhoods

Existing research on gentrification has been divided; some research finds negative impacts on gentrifying communities, while other research finds the process of gentrification to have benefits for the gentrifying communities. Research indicates the benefits that gentrification provides including bringing a life and vibrancy to a community, a reduction in crime, and health and educational benefits (Mehdipanah et al. 2018; Papachristos et al. 2011). There are new places to eat and shop, new places to live, an increase in property values, and new jobs for the community (Byrne 2003). These changes, in turn, offer the potential for an increase in the academic achievement of children living in gentrifying communities (Pearman 2019). Some scholars argue that while gentrification can cause some problems, they are insignificant in comparison to other contemporary urban issues that to study them is a waste of time (Massey 2002).
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Orang Seletar adaption to urbanisation through housing in relation to sense of place

Orang Seletar adaption to urbanisation through housing in relation to sense of place

The existing neighbourhood is not taken into account as important criteria towards the social identity, which is a tangible gap that should be improved on. The existing outdoor environment does not create a vibrant atmosphere nor promotes social interaction. It does not provide them with an economic niche where their existing livelihoods are being compromised. The current approach of their living dwellings creates an atmosphere that is not conducive for living, which deters vitality of the area. A housing unit should go beyond the unit level and contribute to the macro scale development as well as the environment. Hence, a comfortable living experience can be achieved through the place-making.
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Sustainability on the Australian rangelands: learning, roles in life and sense of place

Sustainability on the Australian rangelands: learning, roles in life and sense of place

Attachment to the occupation and lifestyle of cattle grazing and rural living does not appear, from the results of this study, to be very aligned with an interest in learning and adaptation, nor a capacity to cope well with adverse changes. Characteristics (e.g. open space, peace and quiet, solitude, clean air) of rural living that are attractive to beef producers contain aspects of the ‘rural idyll’ that have been identified by other rural studies (e.g. Milburn et al. 2010; Halfacre 1995). Beef producers attracted to these aspects of rural living and aspects of the occupation, such as autonomy, producing cattle and working with animals, appear to have a low propensity for engaging in new learning and managing proactively. Other studies have similarly found that a strong attachment to qualities of the rural life and livelihood can be a source of resistance to nature conservation interventions and initiatives (e.g. Jacobs & Buijs 2011; Cross et al. 2011). Beef producers could be resistant to learning and change because they may not want to compromise or alter their valued lifestyle and occupational interests. Aspects of the occupation of grazing such as working with animals and producing good quality cattle appear to be practices that are identity enhancing and provide sources of self-worth and satisfaction.
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Learning and change in rural regions: understanding influences on sense of place.

Learning and change in rural regions: understanding influences on sense of place.

The analysis showed how sense of place was influenced strongly by childhood experiences, both for people who grew up in the case study locations and for people who grew up elsewhere. Other strong influences on place involved living in a similar environment overseas, seeking profit and having a sense of self focussed on agricultural production. Of particular interest is that for many participants who moved to the case study locations, their sense of the Atherton Tablelands or Woodstock was well

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A framework for incorporating sense of place into the management of marine systems

A framework for incorporating sense of place into the management of marine systems

In this study, we have used the tripartite organizing structure by Scannell and Gifford (2010a) and discussed in Lewicka (2011) to develop a SoP framework with 5 categories encompassing 35 marine environment attributes (Table 1), and the processes by which they may affect SoP. By addressing the complex and interrelated dimensions of the person, place, and process that constitute SoP, we offer a holistic approach to understanding and measuring an important human-dimensions concept. This also ensures that our suggestions can be practically applied in existing management to achieve EBM, using approaches such as MSE. This paper is intended to be a significant first step in understanding, measuring, and incorporating marine SoP, to ultimately improve management of our oceans. Because SoP is an important determinant in how people behave in relation to marine places and environments, incorporating this social dimension into marine management appears essential for sustainable resource use. It should no longer be overlooked, but can in many cases enhance how we manage marine systems. Research on SoP in the marine realm will need to be further developed through trial and application, and we make no claims that such a complex concept will be easy to define and operationalize. We also acknowledge that our framework leaves unanswered questions as to how changes in the marine environment might affect SoP and how SoP dynamics might change behavior in a system feedback. We highlight these as important areas for future modeling research.
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Exploring melancholy (place to place)

Exploring melancholy (place to place)

This study presented here is built on practice-based research into photographic images of melancholic landscapes. According to Stedman et al. (2004), few photographers are interested in examining the different meanings of the settings in their work. This wider field of research will address how setting effects meaning in my work. The aim of this research is to explore the idea of melancholy through the study and practice of landscape photographic imagery. Moreover, sometimes melancholy may be understood in relation to unhappiness and pain; nevertheless, it usually accompanies happiness. The photographs will be shaped by the viewpoint of the researcher and the influence of ideas about, for example, melancholy, the Sublime and nostalgia. Those kinds of emotions, which are rarely similar to unhappiness, nonetheless are more advanced and refer to some level of enjoyment. In addition, on this level of melancholy, positive motivation and pleasure will be more deliberate. This study is limited to a certain cultural, historical context, especially with regard to particular fine artists and poets, and also my emotional response, as a self-reflexive person, to the body of work that I have produced in the content of my findings
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Impact of place of residence on place of death in Wales: an observational study

Impact of place of residence on place of death in Wales: an observational study

For the first time, this study allows us to look into socio- economic deprivation and access to healthcare prevailing in Wales and their ability to influence end of life care and place of death in the region. It highlights the organization of dying in different areas across Wales and shows that large differences exist in the proportion of deaths and place of death among residents of different deprivation quintiles and that these differences are accounted for in part by provision of access to health care services and resources and in part by the level of deprivation of the geographical regions in which they are living. It also shows a broad difference between the actual and preferred place of death among the Welsh population. Despite all unfavourable health indicators for deprived regions in Wales, home deaths was high. Further investigation is required to understand the rea- son for the contradictory findings. It is also recom- mended that further research is carried out to find out the quality and cost of care in all locations that provide end of life care in Wales, because currently there is little evidence on the quality of care experienced by the pa- tient and the family and costs for both the patient and healthcare providers in each of the six locations.
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Engaging in Inclusion: Cultivating LGBTQ Students’ Sense of Belonging through a Critical Place-Based Curriculum

Engaging in Inclusion: Cultivating LGBTQ Students’ Sense of Belonging through a Critical Place-Based Curriculum

There were two goals for this assignment. First, students would learn how to engage in research and begin using citations. Second, students would find more out about the campus as a place, thus bolstering their sense of belonging. Unlike the original version of the assignment, because my students were using a critical place- based curriculum, they also had the opportunity to critically question who, exactly, were the “local and global communities” served in the university mission, as well as exactly whose quality of life it affected. Students questioned these seemingly value-neutral statements because, from their place-based research, they found that while some communities are directly supported, others are often left out entirely.
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The Book and Place, the Place of the Book

The Book and Place, the Place of the Book

F resh out of college at the turn of the millennium, I spent a year in Rome, working on a magazine for tourists. I took with me a single book, Ulysses, thinking that I would finally have time to read it properly. I did; but I also found myself buying more and more books, most of them grievously overpriced at the handful of English book- stores in the city. I had the Internet while I was at work, though email was my primary use of it. Hearing from friends in New York and Boston, I had the feeling that I was liv- ing in some kind of cultural backwater. Exciting things were happening there: new books that I had to read, magazines that I could not get, new journals that were not making it out of States. And so I read, imagining what it would be like to discuss the new Jonathan Lethem in New York. I was on, I felt, the fringes of a world of letters that I wanted to be a part of. I was interested in Italy, of course, but the Italy I was primarily interested in was that of the past. Rome is not a place one goes to consider the future.
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The Place of Food Systems: Exploring the Relationship between Sense of Place and Community Food Systems Engagement

The Place of Food Systems: Exploring the Relationship between Sense of Place and Community Food Systems Engagement

Our pedagogical approach addresses National Science Standards (NGSS Lead States, 2013) to ensure students are adequately prepared to reach their educational goals (Appendix I). We recognize the importance of meeting standards in order to allow lessons to be incorporated into a science curriculum. The most powerful piece of this geoscience research project, however, was the context in which it was developed. Lessons were rooted in the community, in which it was taught, utilizing and recognizing the importance of TEK through involvement of elders. This project was developed to demonstrate that TEK holds equal vales to Western Science.
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Sense Of Place Dynamics In Historic City Centre Of Tangerang

Sense Of Place Dynamics In Historic City Centre Of Tangerang

the community. The Kalipasir Mosque at The Historic city center of Tangerang that was built based on the tolerance of Muslim society. The orientation point of the mosque does not refer to the Kaaba, because it avoids the eviction of a community environment. Physically, except for the age of the building which is more than 3 centuries old, the building of this mosque does not have certain architectural characteristics. The Kalipasir Mosque was the starting point for the spread of Islam in the city of Tangerang. Kalipasir Mosque underwent several renovations, most recently in 1961 and in 2002 was registered as a historic building by the local government, where religious activities take place every day. Kalipasir Mosque is currently experiencing damage to the main pillar structure (figure 2). This dangerous condition, reduces religious activity in the mosque. At present, religious daily activities that take place only involve a limited number of people. Sattarzadeh [22] argued that sense of place is a subjective perception of people of their environment and their conscious feeling about that place as Jorgensen on Sattarzadeh [22] detailed that sense of place can be understood as a multidimensional construct that represents beliefs, emotions and behavioral commitments regarding a particular geographic setting. On the other hand, Dergisi [23] argues that the intuitive experiences and inspirations and sacred perceptions are not formless and they are dependent on time and location of mind and its experimental perceptions. The change in physical structure due to the age of the building which has hundreds of years old, affects the diversity of religious activities in the Kalipasir Mosque. It is causing a different meaning. The shift in sense of sacrality
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Addressing the negative impact of consumerism on young people by (re)awakening their spirituality through sense of place

Addressing the negative impact of consumerism on young people by (re)awakening their spirituality through sense of place

The sociocultural dimension (e.g. cultural practices, community attachment) of sense of place relates to the attributes of both relation and balance (Webster 2004) as explained above. It also speaks to the first and third gateways of Kessler (2000) namely deep connection and the search for meaning and purpose. The latter involves the need for students to ask deep questions of what their purpose on earth is and how it fits into the bigger picture for example: “Who am I?” “What am I?” “What is my being?” “What is the meaning of being?” and “How do I relate to the social and cultural world, that is, my place and community?” (Webster 2004, 11 ‒13). However, in the search for answers to these questions, one should remember that the individual does not exist in a detached way from the world and that inner truth does not emerge independently from being-in-the-world. In order to strengthen the socio-cultural dimension, educators should create opportunities for profound encounters with people from various cultures and religions. By doing this, a sense of wholeness and interconnectedness of self with the social is felt. In such experiences students subconsciously “come into presence” through the power and subtlety of otherness. The socio-cultural dimension not only helps in reflecting on one’s attachment to and ties with communities but also makes one realise that even though one might be influenced and affected by society and the embedded relations, one is not determined by them.
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A Place to Live, A Place to Stay

A Place to Live, A Place to Stay

The International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC) and the North West Gateway Resettlement Partnership of the UK are delighted to present to you ‘A Place to Live, A Place to Stay: A Good Practice Guide for Housing in Refugee Resettlement’. This publication is the result of 12 months of research and consultation with partners and stakeholders of the SHARE Network, supported by the SHARE Expert Group on Housing. This work aimed to identify and structure creative, innovative and successful approaches to providing housing for resettled refugees, to make recommendations for developing this area of work and – ultimately – to strengthen local refugee reception and integration programmes to bring about more and better resettlement in Europe. ICMC and the North West Partnership sincerely hope that this publication will contribute to the further expansion of the SHARE Network and to a renewed invitation to regions, cities, municipalities, civil society organisations, housing actors and local citizens that may find it of interest.
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PSYCHOLOGICAL NEEDS FOR SENSE OF PLACE AND PERSONAL SPACE IN PUBLIC AREA

PSYCHOLOGICAL NEEDS FOR SENSE OF PLACE AND PERSONAL SPACE IN PUBLIC AREA

The phenomenological aspect of the ‘space’ can provide understanding to the relationship between man and environment and derive the outcomes from the environment-behavior researches .This perspective can provides useful conceptual language for bridging the researcher's intuitive theoretical approach to understanding with the realistic intellectual approach and rationalized and reconcile the difficult tensions between feeling and thinking and between firsthand lived experience and secondhand conceptual accounts of that experience. The optimum healthy environment as ‘the conditions which tend to promote or permit an animal optimal physiological, mental, and social performance in its natural or 'evolutionary' environment’ are true as per Tracy, J. (2005) statement. And well-being needs are connected to fulfillment, satisfaction, quality of life, psychological health and positive emotions. Taken as a whole, the research by Boyden and others identifies well-being needs that should be addressed in building design which relates to the place where man lives, more so, in public area:
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Increasing a Sense of Place Using Blended Online and On Site Learning

Increasing a Sense of Place Using Blended Online and On Site Learning

environmental morals. This met the three parts of placed based learning addressed by Karrow and Fazio (2010): natural, cultural, and ontological. Place based focused instruction included using local case study examples to learn more about the topics; which encouraged a blended learning format. A natural history awareness was provided via a guest speaker and field trips (on and off campus). The guest speaker discussed the cultural context of farming in central Arizona. A field trip to a local restoration area showed how a traditionally marginalized neighborhood could have a green space encompassing native flora and fauna. Finally, the on campus exploration encouraged discussion on campus values based on campus design and individual lifestyle choices. These experiences and activities were designed to encourage further student discussion to share their own background knowledge on information they were learning.
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Artists and the articulation of islandness, sense of place, and story in Newfoundland and Tasmania

Artists and the articulation of islandness, sense of place, and story in Newfoundland and Tasmania

NewfRXQGODQGOLWHUDWXUHDVKDYLQJµcaptured the international imagination, to the extent that they have, partly because they are charting uncharted territory²the specific details of place, voice, cadence, and wit that come from living on islands at the periSKHU\DWWKHHQGVRIWKHHDUWK¶Little wonder, then, that American writer Barry Lopez (1996: 4) ZULWHVDERXWµthe human ability to make a story¶ a story that is grounded SRZHUIXOO\LQSODFHDQGDERXWµthe power of the human imagination to extrapolate from an RGGKDQGIXORIWKLQJV« Eventually, the landscape inhabits us, and its accumulated stories and memories become pDUWRIRXUFROOHFWLYHQDUUDWLYH¶. Thus island artists seem more and more focused on their localized identities and cultures²their homes. Indeed, having power over their own stories is a way of ensuring that their voices²and truths²are heard. As a result, island artists also seem to offer an attitude of cultural confidence that may derive from maintaining distinct cultural identities, particularly those physically set apart, and where a shared identity is crucial to creating community. In short, it is possible to speculate that essence of place (its genius loci), attachment to place, island identity, and the prevalence of story play significant roles LQLVODQGHUV¶individual and collective perceptions of self. But these possibilities are extensible; the particularism of island places and island voices often resonates to the universal. Authentic stories grounded in real lives that speak to common themes are those that bring the most critical acclaim from
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Increasing a Sense of Place Using Blended Online and On Site Learning

Increasing a Sense of Place Using Blended Online and On Site Learning

I use a powerful experience to emphasize this point: an Environmental Justice tour of Louisville. Most teachers are unaware of the local environmental history and current issues and how it disproportionately affects some more than others. By actually taking them to physical locations instead of just reading about them, teachers are confronted by the realities of peoples’ situations and the way it may impact their lives (some of whom are my teachers’ students), as well as others further down the Ohio River. The Louisville Environmental Justice tour was devel- oped by my friend and colleague Russ Barnett who is also the Director of the Kentucky Institute for the Environment and Sustainable Development. Russ took me on the tour when I first came to Louisville to help me better understand this urban environment. It has become a mainstay in many of the classes that I teach. A main portion of the tour focuses on an area called Rubbertown, named for the prevalence of rubber-making plants that were built here in the 1940s. It is well- known as the largest source of industrial emissions releasing over three million pounds of air toxins annually, according to air toxic monitoring completed by a partnership between concerned citizens, the University of Louisville, the Environmental Protection Agency, Rubbertown Industries, and so forth. The resi- dents (zip code 40211 and 40202) are primarily African American, single, and the median income is significantly lower than US averages – according to the 2000 US census report. The residential communities in this area were developed in response to the increasing need for housing associated with rubber jobs during World War II. The west end is not seen as a desirable place to live. The monitoring program found cancer risks from long-term exposure near Rubbertown in 2005. The findings were 4–60 times higher than a monitoring station on the east end. As a result of foul odors and visual pollution, the community and industry established the West Jefferson County Community Task Force (www.wjcctf.org) to identify environ- mental issues in the community and “to empower residents to make informed decisions on environmental justice issues” (www.wjcctf.org/about). This engagement has led to increased community awareness and agency, which I have seen from the active community members as they work to improve the area. At the same time, I cannot help but to question the “hidden agendas” represented in the websites above. The task force make up is not reflective of the community at large. Is the sense of community agency one where the community members gain meaningful involvement to have a say?
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Increasing a Sense of Place Using Blended Online and On Site Learning

Increasing a Sense of Place Using Blended Online and On Site Learning

Informal  assessments  are  an  integral  part  of  any  quality  course.  Many  blended  learning  faculty   incorporate  these  types  of  assessments  into  their  courses  to  increase  their  presence  in  the  online   environment  and  to  keep  track  of  their  students’  learning  using  tools  within  the  learning  management   system  (LMS)  or  publicly-­‐available  alternatives  if  necessary.  Approaches  to  informal  assessment  vary.   For  instance,  some  LMSs  (or  free  online  tools)  allow  faculty  to  create  practice  exams/self-­‐tests  for   students  to  complete.  While  unscored,  these  informal  assessments  often  provide  data  for  the  instructor   to  review  as  one  indicator  of  student  learning.  As  one  example,  in  the  context  of  an  introductory  biology   course,  Walker  et  al.  (2014)  studied  the  comparative  effect  of  non-­‐credit,  online  practice  exams  on   students’  performance  on  in-­‐class  graded  exams.  This  rigorous  study  found  that  “students  who  took   these  practice  exams  achieved  significantly  higher  scores  on  the  corresponding  for-­‐credit  exams….”(p.   154).    Since  the  study  controlled  for  potential  intervening  variables,  “the  results  show  that  the  benefit  of   practice  exams  is  not  simply  an  artifact  of  student  self-­‐selection”  (p.  154).    In  the  case  of  a  different   discipline,  Riley  et  al.  (2014)  found  that  online  self-­‐assessment  quizzes  as  part  of  online  modules  in  a   blended  writing  course  were  “crucial  for  the  students’  subsequent  execution  of  the  class’  main  essay   assignments”  (p.  168).  
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Sense of Place in Tourism and Leisure: the Case of Touring Skiers in Quebec

Sense of Place in Tourism and Leisure: the Case of Touring Skiers in Quebec

Man  has  become  ‘hyper  mobile’  in  both  his  private  and  professional  spheres  (Hibbert   and  al.,  2013;  Moser  and  Weiss,  2003).  This  increased  mobility  led  to  daily  or  at  least   regular   consumption,   usage   and   appropriation   of   new   places,   which   de   facto   contributes  to  renewing  certain  theoretical  and  conceptual  approaches  regarding  the   links   between   people   and   their   environment   (Moser   and   Weiss,   2003).   From   this   analytical   perspective,   studying   places   visited   for   leisure   purposes   became   a   core   element   in   emerging   reflections   as   they   appear   to   be   more   than   mere   functional   spaces  used  for  a  certain  practice  (Elkington  and  Gammon,  2014;  Hibbert  and  al.,  2013;   Crouch,   2000).   Furthermore   and   from   a   geographical   standpoint,   Bédard   (2012)   suggests  that  the  increased  marketing  of  urban,  suburban  and  rural  territories  in  recent   years   adds   additional   importance   to   landscaping   as   a   way   to   express   the   identity   of   certain  places.  For  this  author  and  for  Chartier  (2013),  we  share  a  common  planet  and   often   use   the   same   places   or   types   of   places,   but   we   discern   and   perceive   them   through   a   unique   frame   of   knowledge,   values,   ambitions   and   memories   which   lends   every  place  a  distinctive  meaning.  Despite  this  search  for  territorial  sense,  individually   or   collectively,   consciously   or   unconsciously,   landscaping   currently   resolves   around   bringing   upfront   regulated   and   standardized   key   places   which   mark   and   symbolize   modernity   with   a   worrying   lack   of   significance   and   social   anchoring   as   far   as   local   communities  and  tourists  are  concerned  (Bédard,  2012).  Several  authors  thus  suggest   that   the   sense   of   place   as   common   knowledge   needs   to   be   renewed,   which   entails   studying  the  importance  of  the  authentic  cultural  and  social  attributes  of  a  destination,   marked  by  the  daily  lives  of  its  local  inhabitants  (Chartier,  2013;  Bédard,  2012;  Crouch,   2000).  
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