Top PDF Logistics of dangerous goods transported by road

Logistics of dangerous goods transported by road

Logistics of dangerous goods transported by road

Ključne besede:nevarna snov, prevoz, skladiščenje, embalaţa Logistics of dangerous goods transported by road Logistics of dangerous goods transported by road is a very important field of transport because it covers the manipulation of goods that can be dangerous to people or can to damage to the environment. Essential law regulating the field of transporting dangerous goods by road is Slovenian law of transportation of dangerous goods (ZPNB). The law covers every bit of the field so there are as less accidents as possible. All the companies working with dangerous goods must obey that law and work as it says. We have focused on describing the manipulation of dangerous goods in this paper and also on laws in this field. We put in a practical example of a company working with sulphuric acid that is Cinkarna Celje d.d. In the end we presented our findings and accuracy of our hypotheses.
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ISSN VALUE ADDED SERVICES IN TERMINALS FOR DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTED BY RAIL

ISSN VALUE ADDED SERVICES IN TERMINALS FOR DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTED BY RAIL

It can be concluded, that VAS is a complex care about the shipment [5, 6, 7]. Maximization of positive effects from VAS logistics can be achieved by using intermodal and multimodal consignments. But optimal places for this logistic technology are public logistic parks. The capacities intended for logistic activities are optimally located in the space to minimize negative externalities. The reasons for VAS realization are primarily economical with the multiplication of activities´ realization. Provider of these logistic services is focused only on these specific activities, while he don´t have to care about logistic park equipment, because these active and passive logistic elements are operating by the logistic park operator.
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Risk Assessment of Transport for the Dangerous Goods in Austrian Road Tunnels

Risk Assessment of Transport for the Dangerous Goods in Austrian Road Tunnels

investigation delivered precise information about the UN number, the amount, type and destination of the dangerous goods transports which allows a much better allocation of the composition of DG transports to the accident scenarios of the risk model. In addition, the results revealed that in Austria the composition of the dangerous goods transported varies only slightly on different traffic routes and that these variations have only little influence on the risk faced by tunnel users. A standardized composition of DGs transports on Austria’s main roads could hence be defined as a basis for the risk analysis.
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A Risk Assessment for Road Transportation of Dangerous Goods: A Routing Solution

A Risk Assessment for Road Transportation of Dangerous Goods: A Routing Solution

ISO 39001 is a voluntary standard. Promoting it to companies carrying dangerous goods means providing a tool that allows to accomplish the RTSMS requirements enhancing their competitiveness, in addition to the right training on risk management. Route optimization software for haulage generally provides the best route on transport costs, logistics costs, driver's breaks, traffic conditions, road network's restrictions (for weight, dimensions, goods, or other as “for residents only”). Referring the dangerous goods carriage, route optimization software normally provides data on banned thoroughfares throughout Europe. It takes into account (or provides) no information on travel risk.
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Legal Framework for the Transportation of Dangerous Goods in Kosovo

Legal Framework for the Transportation of Dangerous Goods in Kosovo

The law for the transport of dangerous goods of the year 2004, which was repealed by the law on road transport of dangerous goods of the year 2012, has set the conditions and criteria that must be met by a substance, respectively by a commodity, in order to be considered as dangerous. Thus, under the provisions of that law, dangerous goods are substances and objects which endanger the public safety or public order, especially, the life and health of people and animals, plants and objects due to their nature, characteristics and the conditions during their transportation, whose transport is forbidden by the ADR, or are permitted to be transported under special conditions. 3
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Safety in Tunnels TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS THROUGH ROAD TUNNELS TRANSPORT

Safety in Tunnels TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS THROUGH ROAD TUNNELS TRANSPORT

Fire-resistant equipment Results The results developed in this section suggest that introducing a fire-resistant structure and access to fire-resistant equipment has little or no influence on the risk probabilities compared to the base case (no change). This result was expected since these measures are designed to reduce the damages associated with dangerous goods and fire events rather than reduce their likelihood of occurrence. Introducing a CCTV system along the tunnel has a negligible reduction effect on the chance of a cargo fire. The largest risk reduction effects are those resulting from the reduction of the speed limit and the introduction of an escort vehicle behind the dangerous goods being transported. The use of escorts has the most desirable effect on reducing all components of risk, i.e. accident, engine fire, release and cargo fire.
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ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS in the Netherlands for the transport of dangerous goods by road (Status: )

ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS in the Netherlands for the transport of dangerous goods by road (Status: )

d. the driver of a transport unit, loaded with dangerous goods, shall provide the necessary information on the nature and quantity of the dangerous goods being transported to the shipmaster or a staff member of the ferry office appointed for this purpose, before driving onto the ferry.

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STORAGE AND HANDLING OF DANGEROUS GOODS

STORAGE AND HANDLING OF DANGEROUS GOODS

draining spilled liquids to an underground sump or tank, or to an external pit, avoids the access problems associated with bunds. However, the drain network, pit, tank or sump themselves become a potential source of hazards. Possible incompatibility of goods drained to the sump should be included in the risk assessment. design needs to be to a suitable standard. underground or covered sumps or pits should be designed to the standards for underground tanks. Generally, each such containment system should be exclusively for the effluent from one store or work area, unless all the dangerous goods or combustible liquids are compatible and effective provision is made to prevent flashback through drain pipes.
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DANGEROUS GOODS INSPECTORS HANDBOOK

DANGEROUS GOODS INSPECTORS HANDBOOK

3.1 The Seconded Dangerous Goods Inspectors shall periodically carry out inspection of aircraft/airport operators, shippers/freight forwarders and cargo terminals/ warehouses etc. to ensure that the requirements in respect of transportation of dangerous goods such as packing, marking, labelling, documentation and handling etc. as laid down in the Aircraft (Carriage of Dangerous Goods) Rules, 2003 are being complied with. In addition, spot checks may also be conducted as and when considered necessary. 3.2 During inspection, the following points, amongst others, may be checked:-
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HS404 Dangerous Goods Storage Guideline

HS404 Dangerous Goods Storage Guideline

These maximum limits per area are more conservative than the limits for minor storage allowed in the individual Australian Standard for each dangerous good. For example in AS1940: Storage and Handling of Flammable Liquids, the minor quantity limit allowed for laboratory situations is 50 L per 50 m 2 . This limit does not take into account the fact that, in many laboratories, each class (or at least most classes) of dangerous goods could be present. It is possible that a value somewhere between 10 and 50 L could be selected depending on an

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Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

Not classified as Dangerous Goods by the criteria of the "Australian Code for the Transport of Dangerous Goods by Road & Rail" and the "New Zealand NZS5433: Transport of[r]

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Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

Non-rapidly or rapidly degradable substance for which there are adequate chronic toxicity data available OR in the absence of chronic toxicity data, Acute toxicity estimate (based on i[r]

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Quantitative operational risk analysis for dangerous goods transportation through cut and cover road tunnels

Quantitative operational risk analysis for dangerous goods transportation through cut and cover road tunnels

2 RISK ANALYSIS IN ROAD TUNNELS Risk management entails the processes of risk identification, analysis, mitigation and follow up and for each process a set of potential tools exist to aid risk managers in their work (Leopoulos et al., 2006). Specifically for risk analysis, simulation is one of the mostly used tools (Rentizelas et al., 2007; Tziralis et al., 2009). In its bare essence, risk analysis answers the fundamental questions of what can go wrong, how likely it is, as well as what are the consequences (Apostolakis, 2004) and it can be carried out in a qualitative or a quantitative way or as a combination of both. In case of a quantitative analysis, probabilities of accidents and their consequences are estimated. Quantitative risk analysis methods were initially developed in the nuclear industry in the early 1970’s (Rasmussen, 1975). After two severe accidents with hazardous materials in chemical plants (Bhopal, Seveso) the quantitative risk analysis methods were adjusted to chemical plants in the late 1970’s (COVO, 1982), as well.
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Dangerous Goods Safety Guidance Note. Dangerous goods emergency plans for small businesses

Dangerous Goods Safety Guidance Note. Dangerous goods emergency plans for small businesses

In a few cases, if small business operators store more than ten times manifest quantities of dangerous goods, then the emergency plan needs to be supplemented with a FES emergency response guide. This is in the form of a Department of Fire and Emergency Services (DFES) template, which is completed by the operator to give the emergency services responder vital information in a concise format. Information on how to obtain the template is contained in Resources Safety’s information sheet on emergency planning for licensed dangerous goods sites, which summarises an operator’s emergency planning requirements under regulations 75, 76A and 76B of the Storage and Handling Regulations.
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Hazardous, NON-Dangerous Goods

Hazardous, NON-Dangerous Goods

STEL (Short Term Exposure Limit) - the average airborne concentration over a 15 minute period which should not be exceeded at any time during a normal eight-hour workday. These Exposure Standards are guides to be used in the control of occupational health hazards. All atmospheric contamination should be kept to as low a level as is workable. These exposure standards should not be used as fine dividing lines between safe and dangerous concentrations of chemicals. They are not a measure of relative toxicity.

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Transporting Dangerous Goods Safely

Transporting Dangerous Goods Safely

Incompatible dangerous goods must not be included in the same package. IATA imposes additional labelling requirements. Limited Quantities Limited Quantities of some less-hazardous dangerous goods (eg those that are allowed to be carried on passenger aircraft) may be transported in non-UN specification packaging provided special provisions are met. These provisions are detailed in IATA’s section 2.8. The packaging does not have to be officially tested in an approved laboratory to UN specifications, but it must meet the requirements of the relevant Packing Instruction specified in the relevant code. The package must be capable of passing the stacking test and be able to withstand a drop of 1.2 m onto solid concrete in the position most likely to cause damage. IATA denotes limited quantity Packing Instructions by a capital letter ‘Y’ in front of the Packing Instruction number. ICAO and IATA Packing Instruction 910 allows cosmetics, drugs and medicines (packaged for retail sale or distribution for personal or household consumption) to be packed in non-UN specification packaging to a total gross mass of 30 kg. Stretch or shrink-wrapped trays are not acceptable.
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THE OFFERING OF DANGEROUS GOODS FOR CARRIAGE BY AIR

THE OFFERING OF DANGEROUS GOODS FOR CARRIAGE BY AIR

In saying that international standards have a significant role for the airlines, we need to stress that the ICAO standards are actually used in the air carrier industry in a form published by the International Air Transport Association (IATA) as the Dangerous Goods Regulations. These regulations are an important airline industry reference, known world-wide as a source of information about requirements and procedures recognised throughout the airline industry. For example, IATA gives details about preparing the airline industry's standard "Shipper's Declaration for Dangerous Goods," along with information about preparing an accompanying air waybill. Such air waybill details are not covered by ICAO, and since ICAO has no jurisdiction on air waybill matters (an air carrier industry document with commercial rather than safety implications) one could not reasonable expect ICAO to cover such information.
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Hazardous Substance, Dangerous Goods CAUSTIC SODA

Hazardous Substance, Dangerous Goods CAUSTIC SODA

Segregation Dangerous Goods: Not to be loaded with explosives (Class 1), dangerous when wet substances (Class 4.3), oxidising agents (Class 5.1), organic peroxides (Class 5.2), radioactive substances (Class 7) or food and food packaging in any quantity. Note 1: Concentrated strong alkalis are incompatible with concentrated strong acids. Note 2: Concentrated strong acids are incompatible with concentrated strong alkalis. Note 3: Acids are incompatible with Dangerous Goods of Class 6 which are cyanides. Exemptions may apply.

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Railway Transportation of Dangerous Goods: a Bibliometric Aspect

Railway Transportation of Dangerous Goods: a Bibliometric Aspect

The results of bibliometric analysis in the field of road transport medicine have shown that researches are increasing annually, and the cooperation of scientists from different countries is growing [9]. But still, these rates are relatively low compared to other research areas. Studies of rail transport show that they have a high level of penetration of connections in various interdisciplinary areas, especially technical ones [10]. The efforts of the inventors, enshrined in their technical solutions, are aimed at ensuring improved safety, reducing the negative impact on the environment, the use of renewable energy sources, energy efficiency.
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Italian Experiences in the Management of Dangerous Goods Transport

Italian Experiences in the Management of Dangerous Goods Transport

EasyWay – 2008 EasyWay – 2008 Italian Experiences in the Management of Dangerous Goods Transport Luca Studer,.. Laboratory for Mobility and Transport, Politecnico di Milano,.[r]

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