Top PDF Low income pupils’ progress at secondary school

Low income pupils’ progress at secondary school

Low income pupils’ progress at secondary school

iii 5. The progress gap is largest in schools with average levels of pupil disadvantage. The gap between low income pupils and their peers is smaller in schools where the proportions of pupils eligible for FSM are highest and lowest. The gap is larger in schools with average levels of pupil disadvantage. There are a number of reasons for this: in schools with high levels of disadvantage many pupils who are not eligible for Free School Meals are likely to be close to the threshold for FSM eligibility. They are therefore more similar to their eligible peers than in other schools. These schools are also likely to benefit from high levels of Pupil Premium funding allowing them to operate differently compared to schools with a more ‘middling’ intake. Such schools can also develop particular expertise in teaching pupils from low income backgrounds. These schools are also more likely to be in urban areas and therefore to benefit from the urban effect outlined above. Low income pupils in schools with low levels of disadvantage are likely to benefit from small but positive peer group effects.
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Pupils’ attitudes to school and music at the start of secondary school.

Pupils’ attitudes to school and music at the start of secondary school.

declining attitudes and to what can be done to increase their engagement with school. A particular problem with music is the low uptake of music at GCSE level. Lamont and Maton (2008) found that the longer pupils are at school, the more likely are they to view music as being of less significance compared to other school subjects and they start to perceive musical ability as a fixed entity that not everyone possesses. This is unfortunate considering the important role of music for children during the formal school years (Custodero, 2010), for higher education students’ lives (Kokotsaki and Hallam, 2007; 2011) and more generally (Hallam, 2010). These studies suggest that music participation can have powerful intellectual, musical, personal and social effects on an individual throughout life. Effective instructional practices that take into account children’s needs and interests within a supportive learning environment can enable authentic musical experiences well-aligned with children’s musical realities. Changes to pedagogical practices which will offer children opportunities to exercise choice, autonomy and self-directed learning in the classroom can help them develop a sense of positive identification within the context of formal education, both in music learning and in schooling more generally. Such changes It is proposed that changes to pedagogical approaches need to be considered in order for pupils’ attitudes to school and music to be improved or at least to remain stable at the start of secondary school.
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Cyberbullying: its nature and impact in secondary school pupils

Cyberbullying: its nature and impact in secondary school pupils

Reported rates of victims of cyberbullying actually telling anyone in order to get help were 56% in Study One and 59% in Study Two; these appear low com- pared to rates for victims of traditional bullying (Whitney & Smith, 1993); and in Study Two, victims of traditional bullying were significantly more likely to tell someone. If there is an increased reluctance to seek help for victims of cyberbullying, it is important to find out why. Study One data suggest that when victims do tell someone, it is often friends and seldom someone at school. School may be perceived as less relevant, given that much cyberbullying happens outside school. Adults may seem less in- formed about cyberbullying issues and therefore less likely to be approached; this remains an untested hypothesis from our data, but if substantiated would reinforce the need for awareness raising amongst teachers and parents about cyberbullying and pre- ventative measures. It is also worth considering whether ignoring or avoidance strategies, normally considered less productive or affirming responses to traditional bullying than telling, may be more effec- tive for much cyberbullying, with adult intervention needed in rarer media such as picture/video clip bullying (which cannot be avoided by the victim).
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The Manchester Color Wheel: validation in secondary school pupils

The Manchester Color Wheel: validation in secondary school pupils

screening tool for such purposes in large populations of adolescents where the use of long and sometimes rather intrusive questionnaires would be impractical. Our results also indicate that there might be a small but significant number of pupils with a mood disorder and the use of the MCW instrument is a quick and simple way to identify adolescents who may benefit from further investigation, support or intervention. For instance, it is noteworthy that in a recent study on self- harm in adolescents a link with low mood was identified and the authors emphasised the importance of recognis- ing individuals at risk [37]. In addition, the application of the MCW is not necessarily confined to mood; it could be used for gauging the response to a whole variety of questions which in a school, for instance, could be how students perceive the subjects in their curriculum. Another advantage of this instrument, espe- cially for use in population studies, is that it can easily be converted to an electronic form or even an ‘app’ for a smart phone. It might be considered that the utility of the MCW could be limited by color vision deficiency (color blindness), but this problem only occurs in up to 8% of males and 0.5% of females [38]. However, this po- tential drawback is less of a problem than “functional illiteracy” which has been estimated to affect 16% of the U.K. population [39] and impairs the ability to under- stand written medical materials [40] such as psycho- logically orientated questionnaires.
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Value of Spirit of Nationality among Secondary school Pupils

Value of Spirit of Nationality among Secondary school Pupils

2 Associate Professor, Department of Education, St. Josephs College of Education for Women, Andhra Pradesh, India. ABSTRACT This study deals with the investigation of the Value of Spirit of Nationality among secondary school pupils. The study aims to investigate the level of love for country, feeling of brother hood, unity, justice, democracy, equality, sociality, cultural heritage. For this purpose a descriptive survey model of V.S.N. (Value of Spirit of Nationality) Scale developed by Vinaya Ransing, Joyti Shiwalkar and Vrinda Joglekar (2010) was used to collect the data from secondary school pupils. The scale consists of 52 items. These items are divided into 7 components. The factors are mixed randomly. Researcher takes a random sample of 50 secondary school pupils from Guntur District. (Andhra Pradesh). This study limited to the Guntur district only. The data was evaluated by Statistical software using to calculate t-test, F-test, Standard Deviation and Mean tests. The final result revealed that the 12% of the secondary school pupils have low level of Value of Spirit of Nationality. 88 % of the secondary school pupils have average level of Value of Spirit of Nationality. There is no high level of Value of Spirit of Nationality in secondary school pupils. Value of Spirit of Nationality of secondary school pupils in all factors is around 90%. The variable NCC of the secondary school pupils differed significantly in their value of Spirit of Nationality. Other variables like gender, area, type of family didn't play any significant role their value of Spirit of Nationality. According to this study, the investigator concluded NCC cadets and non NCC pupils differ in their value of Spirit of Nationality.
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The wellbeing of secondary school pupils with special educaitonal needs

The wellbeing of secondary school pupils with special educaitonal needs

Furthermore, it is important to acknowledge the potential overlap between the way special educational needs are identified and how wellbeing, especially psychological wellbeing, is measured. Special educational needs cover a wide range of conditions - and in January 2016, 18.5% of children with SEN in secondary schools had ‘social, emotional and mental health’ as their primary type of need (DfE, 2016b). Many more will have these needs in addition to other difficulties. Hence, there is the possibility that having a psychological difficulty can lead to both a SEN diagnosis and a measure of low psychological wellbeing on the ‘emotional difficulties’ domain. However, the measures are far from a perfect overlap and there is still value in understanding how many children with SEN have such psychological difficulties.
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Pupil mobility, attainment and progress in secondary school

Pupil mobility, attainment and progress in secondary school

Similarly change of school will not necessarily result in poor attainment, the reason for the move of school will be an important mediating factor. Where the mobility reflects new entrants to England then the association with attainment is most pronounced. These pupils faced substantial social, cultural and linguistic adjustments, beyond a simple change of school. More generally, children of refugees, asylum seekers or labour migrants who have just entered the country directly from overseas, and pupils admitted following family breakdown, domestic difficulties, the imprisonment of a parent or school problems such as exclusion may all be more likely to experience problems. At the same time there is little evidence to demonstrate a negative impact of mobility for children of professional and managerial workers and other high income groups who are mobile for career reasons (Dobson & Henthorne, 1999) or children of military families (Marchant & Medway, 1987). The individual circumstances of pupils, the attitudes and
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Pupil mobility, attainment and progress in secondary school

Pupil mobility, attainment and progress in secondary school

Similarly change of school will not necessarily result in poor attainment, the reason for the move of school will be an important mediating factor. Where the mobility reflects new entrants to England then the association with attainment is most pronounced. These pupils faced substantial social, cultural and linguistic adjustments, beyond a simple change of school. More generally, children of refugees, asylum seekers or labour migrants who have just entered the country directly from overseas, and pupils admitted following family breakdown, domestic difficulties, the imprisonment of a parent or school problems such as exclusion may all be more likely to experience problems. At the same time there is little evidence to demonstrate a negative impact of mobility for children of professional and managerial workers and other high income groups who are mobile for career reasons (Dobson & Henthorne, 1999) or children of military families (Marchant & Medway, 1987). The individual circumstances of pupils, the attitudes and
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The primary prevention of violence in secondary school pupils in the West of Scotland

The primary prevention of violence in secondary school pupils in the West of Scotland

57 a positive relationship between narcissism and aggression and there was an interaction between narcissism and ego threat. This confirmed the hypothesis and indicated that individuals who scored highly in narcissism were exceptionally aggressive. There was no significant effect between self-esteem (low or high) and aggression, indicating that self-esteem (as measured by the Rosenberg scale) did not have a direct link to aggression. While this does not provide support for a direct relationship between aggression and self-esteem, it also suggests that there is no relationship between low self-esteem and violence as has been previously suggested (see Gilligan, 1999). The study, however, is limited as the measure of aggression may not accurately predict aggressive behaviour in a non-experimental setting. Furthermore, self-esteem was measured at a mass testing session several weeks prior to the experiment, whereas narcissism was measured immediately before the experiment. These limitations could potentially explain why there was no correlation between self-esteem and narcissism. Alternatively, it may be the case that narcissism should be considered distinct from self-esteem and applies to a subset of individuals who have highly favourable, unfounded views of
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The impact of housing tenure on secondary school pupils’ educational attainment

The impact of housing tenure on secondary school pupils’ educational attainment

neighbourhood, due to the presence of the children of owner occupiers, through one or more social interactive neighbourhood effects; and secondly within the school, through institutional effects, in which the resulting change in the mix of pupils in the school has an impact on how processes within the school operate, including teaching. All variables described here were selected because, as outlined in the previous chapter, they not only have been found to have an association with educational attainment, but could also explain an association between housing tenure and educational attainment. Of course the inclusion of variables was limited by the data available, which may have resulted in missing confounding variables at all levels. For example, although family is an important influence, as outlined in the conceptual framework in 3.2.2, it was not possible to include this as a level as there was no family data available, such as parental education, income or housing tenure. There was also no prior educational
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Adolescent moral judgement: A study of UK secondary school pupils

Adolescent moral judgement: A study of UK secondary school pupils

Variations by dilemma were also found. Highest scores were achieved when self-discipline or courage was at stake compared to situations involving honesty. One explanation for such low scores for the honesty dilemma is that this creates for pupils a (hypothetical) pull between honesty on the one hand and loyalty to peers on the other. The desire to be well thought of by peers is probably a particular wrench for pupils aged 14 and 15 and this could be reflected in lower scores (cf. Steinberg & Monahan, 2007). However, suggestions of a more general decline in moral judgement in this age group may not be surprising to many parents or teachers given that these young people are beginning to attend to an adult identity, including the re-evaluation of traditional values and ideologies. (See also Nucci and Turiel (2009) for suggestions of a U-shaped pattern in moral development among children). Across all dilemmas, two clear findings, replicated in other Ad-ICM research (USA), stand out, namely that pupils were better able to say what the protagonist should do than why, and that they could select ‘best’ options more easily than ‘worst’ ones. To our knowledge, this finding is the first of its kind in the UK context, especially involving so many schools and pupils. Knowing what to do more than being able to say why seems a likely reality among many young people who are conceivably habituated to some extent in the ways of good character, but who have not yet grown this into a reflective pattern for themselves. Social routine, modelling and habit may well help pupils determine the right thing to do, but the development of an experientially learned capacity to make good moral judgements supported by sound reasoning (or what virtue ethicists call ‘phronesis’) might be lagging behind. An inability to recognise poor choices or poor justifications in the face of difficult situations is an unfortunate deficit in life because individuals under pressure can act out of character or make poor choices with potentially negative repercussions. Although good moral judgment improves through life experience, both of these weaknesses - identified by the ICM survey - ought to be addressed directly in schools. Sensitising children to poor choices could be beneficial and would
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Which incentives to increase survey response of secondary school pupils?

Which incentives to increase survey response of secondary school pupils?

Pupil surveys have become an essential resource for empirical educational re- search. Alongside international representative pupil surveys such as for instance PISA or TIMSS, smaller pupil and teacher surveys at the regional or school- level have become increasingly common in the last decade. At the same time, the participation rate in pupil surveys has declined over time (Sturgis et al., 2006). Several reasons are thought to contribute to low response rates in pupil surveys. Firstly, surveying schoolchildren below the age of 18 generally requires the consent, not only of the pupils themselves, but also of their parents. This can prove problematic if communication between schools, teachers and parents is not optimal. Moreover, the necessity of gaining parental agreement may rein- force a selection bias in participation due to limited language and reading skills in disadvantaged families. Secondly, school directors in the UK report that the number of research requests for schools and pupils to participate in surveys in- creased over the ve years preceding the survey. They stated a lack of time and lack of limited benet for the school as signicant reasons for not partici- pating in surveys (Sturgis et al., 2006). Anecdotal evidence from the Ministry of Education and school directors suggests that in Germany, schools receive an increasing number of requests to participate in pupil and teacher surveys as well.
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An Exploration of the Use of Solution Circles as an Intervention with Secondary School Pupils

An Exploration of the Use of Solution Circles as an Intervention with Secondary School Pupils

When reflecting on the future use of SCs in the schools, the school staff shared that they were motivated to continue the use of the intervention in their schools, as they had been surprised by the impact of it for both the Facilitators and the young people. It was noted that the Facilitators felt they had a new tool to use, and the young people had further developed confidence and problem solving skills. Alongside the positive impact of the intervention, it is also relatively low cost. The main cost to the school will be the time of the Facilitator, which is already factored in for schools where there are support staff available who have a role in delivering interventions. Additionally, there are not many resources needed, only some paper to record the ideas for the Problem Presenter to take away and a sheet of paper outlining the different stages as a prompt. The training for Facilitators takes little time, although for future use considerations of costs may be a factor depending on the service delivery model, if the service usually trade training. Facilitators shared that they felt supported through the process, and therefore the role of the EP in checking in with them regularly and keeping communication open is an important factor to continue. It was also noted that as there were two Facilitators in each school, this was helpful as they could support each other. Schools discussed how they could see the value and intended on continuing using SCs in their schools with young people, but also how it could be used more widely across the school community. One Facilitator noted it could be used with school staff, too. A SENCO suggested it could be used with young people to problem solve specific topics that are prevalent in year groups, such as friendship issues with year 7 pupils.
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Chain effects 2018: The impact of academy chains on low-income pupils

Chain effects 2018: The impact of academy chains on low-income pupils

We are aware of the evidence that a knowledge-based curriculum is related to higher remuneration post- school, as well as to access to high status educational and career routes. 77 We support Wolf’s analysis that equivalent qualifications were often disadvantaging pupils who need a broad and balanced curriculum and credentials that have credibility with employers. 78 The Sutton Trust research on schools that changed their curriculum rapidly when EBacc was first introduced has shown that the disadvantaged pupils in these schools benefited. 79 But at the same time, we are aware that the contrast between EBacc entry rates and EBacc passes in some chains means that the majority of pupils failed to achieve a standard pass in at least one EBacc subject, and possibly more, and we have shown that in some chains high EBacc entry is resulting in a high proportion of grades below a standard pass. The latter cannot be in the interest of pupils. In contrast it seems other chains (and we used Outwood Grange as an example) are apparently showing far greater awareness of their pupils’ exam potential in their exam entry and (closely related) outcomes, and achieving higher numbers of EBacc passes for their disadvantaged pupils in the process, than are those that enter far higher numbers for the EBacc.
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The Formation of School Peer Groups: Pupils’ Transition from Primary to Secondary School in England

The Formation of School Peer Groups: Pupils’ Transition from Primary to Secondary School in England

Finally, we evaluate the degree of bifurcation of the school transition flows: to what extent do poor and non-poor children go their different ways on leaving primary school. The flows that we observe are the end result of the various processes that make up the current system of school choice in England. According to the rhetoric, parents and students should be able to exercise choice at all levels of the educational system, enabling them to opt for their preferred provider and, in part by stimulating inter-school competition, improving the overall quality of provision. Such choice has been available in the English school system since the 1944 Education Act, but its importance has increased very substantially since the Educational Reform Act 1988, and extended thereafter (White et al, 2001). The recent education Act (2006) introduced a new Schools Admissions Code for those making admissions decisions, the governing bodies of self- governing schools and LEAs. 2 Criteria such as parental occupation, income or marital status cannot be taken into account where a school is over-subscribed, nor must they interview applicants and use ‘first preferences’, nor should criteria be set – like the wearing of a school uniform – that would
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PERCEIVING GEOGRAPHY AS A SCHOOL SUBJECT BY PUPILS OF LOWER SECONDARY SCHOOL (IN THE CITIES OF SILESIAN VOIVODESHIP)

PERCEIVING GEOGRAPHY AS A SCHOOL SUBJECT BY PUPILS OF LOWER SECONDARY SCHOOL (IN THE CITIES OF SILESIAN VOIVODESHIP)

A majority of pupils claim that geographical knowledge is useful in life, giv- ing as examples fi eld orientation and the ability to read maps. In this aspect, the results of author’s study diff er from the former ones. In the studies of Kowal- ska and Mularczyk (2003), the respondents living in big cities claimed that ge- ography is only slightly useful in further education and daily life (unlike the respondents living on the countryside who better assess the usefulness of ge- ography). Sadoń-Osowiecka (2004) also wrote about the low assessment of ge- ography in the matter of usefulness in future life and work career. Respondents of these studies defi ned geography as a discipline of purely scientifi c nature, completely unrelated to the reality.
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Using Different Humanoid Robots for Science Edutainment of Secondary School Pupils

Using Different Humanoid Robots for Science Edutainment of Secondary School Pupils

Please note that the participants of the workshop had no or at most very few previous experience with robots or robotics kits. Figures 10 and 11 show the raw data, respectively the means and standard deviations for the statements under Q3.x dealing with previous exposure to different types of robotics kits and humanoids. As can be expected, LEGO Mindstorms were better known than Bioloid robots to the participants before the workshop. But real experiences were not significantly higher for Mindstorms, but quite low for both types of robots.

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Czech Lower Secondary School Pupils' Knowledge about Developing Countries

Czech Lower Secondary School Pupils' Knowledge about Developing Countries

(e.g. World Bank List of Developing Countries, 2015). The typical characteristics of developing countries are: low income, weak human resources and low level of economic diversification. All of these characteristics have got an influence on the life of developing countries and also in direct and indirect aim also the life in developed countries (UNESCO, 2012). The developing countries have got a problem with basic health care, education and clean water and there is only little chance to improve this situation. The world poverty has a negative influence on all people. Children, pupils and students could learn about problems of developing countries in a way that was unknown to the previous generation. The media, Internet, wide possibilities of traveling and others bring fragments of information about world issues into our daily lives. Although the problems of developing countries are relatively alarming, this issue is not among the frequently examined ones. Nowadays, it is possible to see the huge migration of people from some developing countries to Europe (the main aim of the migration is Germany) and many people do not know the reason for the migration. And this ignorance can lead to refusal of immigrants and it can invoke riots among the population. The migration is not only one risk of developing countries next is for example the risk of disease transmission, which are originally occurring only in developing coun- tries and its transmission to developed countries could bring higher costs on the medication. The next point is connecting with political situation in developing countries, which cause financial problems in these countries due to higher level of corruption. There are certainly more risks, which can influence all world from the economical and also political view. The risks of developing countries should not be mentioned only among politics, but also they should be considered already among young people. So the main aim of the study was to find out lower secondary school pupils’ knowledge about developing countries. Costs and benefits asso- ciated with the problematic of the study are in the presentation of pupils’ know- ledge about developing countries. This study is providing not only identification of countries on the map, but also the real problems of developing countries.
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Secondary School Pupils' Relation Towards School

Secondary School Pupils' Relation Towards School

U odnosu srednjoškolaca prema drugim uĉenicima iz razreda, rezultati hi - kvadrat testova pokazali su kako postoji statistiĉki znaĉajna povezanost izmeĊu nezavisnih [r]

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Secondary School Pupils’ Achievements for Success in University Admissions: How a British secondary school evaluates pupils to expand their career path?

Secondary School Pupils’ Achievements for Success in University Admissions: How a British secondary school evaluates pupils to expand their career path?

In response of the question if pupils with good grades look down on pupils with bad grades, two boys answered “No,” and one boy answered “No, at least superficially.” All said “I recognise that pupils who do not have good grades merely do not spend time studying, or place little importance on learning. They choose to be negligent, and these attitudes naturally result in the bad grades. I therefore do not really care what they receive.” C gave several reasons why pupils in higher sets do not look down on pupils in the lower ones. “A pupil in the top level of class sometimes belongs to a lower level of football class. Nobody can belong to the best level in all subjects and activities. It is natural that one person has both advantage and disadvantage, and if he belongs to a lower level of set, it does not mean he has little talent. A pupil with lower academic grades could shine in sports and arts. Because the school provides a large variation of choice of sports and music instruments, a pupil’s talent can blossom in a certain area when he is not good at academic subjects. Even he cannot attain the very good level in non-academic fields, he can at least find his favorites to devote himself.” All three boys told “With these reasons, pupils with lower grades do not easily become timid.”
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