Top PDF Making a house a home : The House Project evaluation. March 2017

Making a house a home : The House Project evaluation. March 2017

Making a house a home : The House Project evaluation. March 2017

Research and practice evidence indicates that young people who leave care aged 16 and 17 (the more vulnerable early leaver group), tend to fare worse after care, and experience a greater level of risk (for example, housing breakdowns, poor outcomes in EET and wellbeing). However, these risks can be embedded within the circumstances in which these young people leave their care placements, rather than attributed to age alone, for example, in the unplanned or unsupported moves to unregulated transitional or transient accommodation and whether they are able to access ongoing support. By focusing on younger care leavers it could be said that the HP is responding to the reality that some young people move on from their care placements early at 16 or 17, either through choice, or because placements break down and options become exhausted, or due to the less comfortable scenario in which some young people are rushed out of care to free up care placements. The HP model has the potential to reduce that risk by providing a planned and highly supported transition which, having permanency running through its core, could reduce the number of post-care moves that young people need to make before finding their home after care. In doing so it could address the tensions that exist within the current system, where services are striving to provide young people with a delayed and gradual move from care whilst contending with the realities of limited availability in transitional options and the fact that the choice and preference for many care leavers is to move into their own tenancy as soon as possible, using intermediate options as short-term stop gaps
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Making a House a Home : The House Project Evaluation

Making a House a Home : The House Project Evaluation

Research and practice evidence indicates that young people who leave care aged 16 and 17 (the more vulnerable early leaver group), tend to fare worse after care, and experience a greater level of risk (for example, housing breakdowns, poor outcomes in EET and wellbeing). However, these risks can be embedded within the circumstances in which these young people leave their care placements, rather than attributed to age alone, for example, in the unplanned or unsupported moves to unregulated transitional or transient accommodation and whether they are able to access ongoing support. By focusing on younger care leavers it could be said that the HP is responding to the reality that some young people move on from their care placements early at 16 or 17, either through choice, or because placements break down and options become exhausted, or due to the less comfortable scenario in which some young people are rushed out of care to free up care placements. The HP model has the potential to reduce that risk by providing a planned and highly supported transition which, having permanency running through its core, could reduce the number of post-care moves that young people need to make before finding their home after care. In doing so it could address the tensions that exist within the current system, where services are striving to provide young people with a delayed and gradual move from care whilst contending with the realities of limited availability in transitional options and the fact that the choice and preference for many care leavers is to move into their own tenancy as soon as possible, using intermediate options as short-term stop gaps
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The Home Improvement Scheme. Making Every House a Home

The Home Improvement Scheme. Making Every House a Home

After successfully piloting a government funded home improvement scheme, we have teamed up with more 2 life, an award winning specialist lender of equity release plans, and Equity Release Assured (ERA), a regulated equity release adviser, to provide a managed package of finance and home improvements for many more homeowners.

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Making a house a home: Local Authorities and disabled adaptations

Making a house a home: Local Authorities and disabled adaptations

Eighteen months later Edward complained to us again. He had asked for further adaptations for his son but the council had not completed all the work and instead had carried out other work which he had not requested. We found the council had not consulted with social workers and other health professionals involved in Ben’s care for a second time. The council had lost Ben’s file so it was difficult to understand what work had been agreed and much of the work, such as rendering an extension, could not be described as disabled adaptations to meet Ben’s needs. This meant the pot of money available to complete adaptations had been significantly reduced and the family were left unsure whether their house met Ben’s needs.
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Making a House a Home: A Community Plan for Regional Engagement on Housing

Making a House a Home: A Community Plan for Regional Engagement on Housing

“cultivating the leadership to work on the development” is vital. Empowering community members and cultivating leadership is not impossible to do. However, capacity must be built before organizing because it is a precursor, it is a stage where “people learn about local government.” The individual furthered this point by noting, “The general public knows less about planning and more about community;” making organizing more of a common tongue than planning. As stated by another individual, community buy-in is furthered when residents are included – planning succeeds when people see the correlation between their voices and change (personal communication, 22 February 2019). Success is even more likely when a group, like Virginia Organizing, leaves a community with a “stool” of buy-in, leadership, and capacity in place. The stool further requires an on-the-ground non-profit, residents, and the city to ensure its success. After winning a campaign, it is vital this stool is set in place; without it, there is a lack of management of what the campaign won.
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Making Ourselves at Home: Representation, Preservation & Interpretation at Canada's House Museums

Making Ourselves at Home: Representation, Preservation & Interpretation at Canada's House Museums

41 Ibid., xiv. 42 House museums are not interchangeable with art museums for Higonnet. In Canada, some sites showcase great works of art by known and respected Canadian artists. The majority of artworks that hang on their walls and decorate their mantles, however, would not typically be regarded as examples of high art. Unlike the art museum, the house museum may not emphasize art in distinction from its other contents. The works of amateur painters hang on the same walls as artworks by well-known artists. Needlework completed by the women of the houses is displayed beside framed works of respected portraitists. The most exceptional pieces can remain unnoticed, blending in amongst the other decorative and mundane objects. Luxton House exhibits drawings by Carl Rungius, Mount Uniacke maintains a sketch made by John Elliott Woolford and Banting House displays numerous paintings completed by Frederick Banting under the tutelage of A. Y. Jackson. 42 Other museums possess artworks by artists of unknown or not-apparent repute. A series of watercolour sketches of wrecked vessels and Sable Island by the physician-artist Dr. John Bernard Gilpin line the upstairs hallway of the Admiral Digby Museum. If art historians have become frustrated with the canon, and the regulated narratives it generates within major museums, then Canada’s historic house museums provide a glimpse of art that has not been framed by the professional discourses and expert tastes in the same way. They often offer a sense of the artists that were recognized within certain localities, even those not incorporated into the canon of Canadian art.
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Home Energy Evaluation Report for House Three

Home Energy Evaluation Report for House Three

Air Sealing: Air infiltration in homes can amount to as much as 30-40% of heating and cooling losses. Air infiltrates through the exterior envelope making it more difficult to maintain the conditioned air inside the envelope. This occurs through a loss of heat in the cooler months and a gain in humidity in the warmer months. Humid air takes more energy to cool and dehumidify. Leakage generally occurs at a thermal bypass. A thermal bypass is a design or building flaw which allows heat to enter or leave the building and increases the cost of heating and cooling your home. A bypass compromises the thermal properties of your insulating and sheathing materials. In many cases, a bypass can interfere with the insulation of a wall or building system, causing higher energy use, moisture-related material destruction, and decreased comfort for those living in your home. A comprehensive air sealing effort will eliminate the majority of the existing leaks.
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Ballinamore House Nursing Home, OSV 0000317, 20 September  2017

Ballinamore House Nursing Home, OSV 0000317, 20 September 2017

Please state the actions you have taken or are planning to take: OT seating assessments have been completed and reports are available, chairs have been ordered with an approximate 3 week wait for company that are making them. Speech and Language assessments and recommendations are available for any resident who has a specific requirement. In relation to the resident with no clear guidelines documented this resident was transferred from an acute setting without any guidelines, we as nurses used our clinical knowledge and assessment skills to put in place a

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Raheny House Nursing Home, OSV 0000138, 8 December 2017

Raheny House Nursing Home, OSV 0000138, 8 December 2017

The inspector found that residents with a diagnosis of dementia were consulted in how the centre was run and that there was a person centred approach to residents that respected their privacy and dignity. Throughout the inspection residents with dementia were seen to be making choices about their day to day life at the centre. For example when to get up, what to eat and drink at meal times, where to spend time in the centre and what activities to take part in during the day. The inspector found that at most time staff demonstrated patience and skills with those residents who had cognitive impairments taking time to explain
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Aisling House Nursing Home, OSV 0000003, 11 April 2017

Aisling House Nursing Home, OSV 0000003, 11 April 2017

Throughout the inspection residents were seen to be making choices about how their day to day life was spent at the centre. For example when to get up, what to choose at meal times, where to spend time in the centre and whether to get involved in the activities taking place throughout the day. Residents made good use of the communal areas but could spend time in the quiet areas if they choose to do so. Residents stated that they could use the visitors’ room to meet privately with their friends and family when they wished.

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Athlunkard House Nursing Home, OSV 0000729, 6 March 2018

Athlunkard House Nursing Home, OSV 0000729, 6 March 2018

Page 2 of 4 Section 1 The provider and or the person in charge is required to set out what action they have taken or intend to take to comply with the regulation in order to bring the centre back into compliance. The plan should be SMART in nature. Specific to that regulation, Measurable so that they can monitor progress, Achievable and Realistic, and Time bound. The response must consider the details and risk rating of each regulation set out in section 2 when making the response. It is the provider’s responsibility to ensure they implement the actions within the timeframe.

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Nazareth House Nursing Home, OSV 0000369, 28 March 2018

Nazareth House Nursing Home, OSV 0000369, 28 March 2018

A small shop had also been established beside the coffee area, and was operated by a volunteer. Toiletries, food and drinks and other items were available. An activities programme had been developed and this was carried out across both units by a full-time activities co-ordinator. Records indicated that a combination of group activities and one- to-one activities were carried out across the week of the inspection, as well as sessions provided by external people such as musicians. These activities included pet therapy, Easter card-making, reminiscence therapy, board games, painting and karaoke. The activities co-ordinator outlined to inspectors how they ensured that residents were supported to participate in meaningful activities in line with their preferences and
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Parke House Nursing Home, OSV 0000083, 7 March 2018

Parke House Nursing Home, OSV 0000083, 7 March 2018

There were regular residents' meetings and it was noted that residents' feedback informed management to make changes to the service. For example residents had raised comments about the type of meals provided and this had resulted in a change of menu and a review of processes in the dining rooms. Residents had access to nutritious food throughout the day and snacks and drinks were readily available. Dining areas were pleasant but inspectors observed that staff who served and assisted residents during their meals wore hairnets and aprons making the dining experience more institutional than homely.
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Lawford House Residential Home

Lawford House Residential Home

hates these." Staff spoke to the person during our inspection about the possibility of planting strawberries in the garden. The person's relative told us the person had never enjoyed gardening. We saw the person did not express an interest in this when suggested to them. On the day of our inspection, we saw staff supported people with knitting, and with an Easter card making activity. However, one person showed us the card-making kit in front of them and said, "These were plonked down on the desk, I don't know what it is." We saw that staff asked one person what colour ribbon they wanted, but the person themselves did not make the card. At our previous inspection, people had requested a take-away, which had not been arranged for them. At this inspection, no take-aways had been bought for people. People told us they would enjoy eating fish and chips "from the paper."
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Belmont House Private Nursing Home, OSV 0000014, 14 March 2018

Belmont House Private Nursing Home, OSV 0000014, 14 March 2018

Progress was also found on the provision of opportunities for meaningful engagement and social inclusion in the community. A varied weekly activity programme was in place and there were more regular opportunities for residents to engage in community social events and outings. Nevertheless, when speaking with residents, inspectors heard they would like these to be more frequent. Inspectors found the activity team were making efforts to devote more time to residents who, due to frailty or choice usually did not take part in the group activities, but they acknowledged that more needed to be done in this regard.
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The Right Home Project. March 2017

The Right Home Project. March 2017

Time scales for all RHP options becoming operational; young people and families taking up options, and restricted evaluation follow-up timescales meant that many of the service users were still in the relatively early stages of their RHP option by T2. This limited the extent to which change over time could be assessed. Resources were insufficient to extend the evaluation fully beyond the original endpoint of March 2016 to allow a longer data collection time frame. Instead, the evaluation closed down for 5 months and re- opened for one month to gather a final round of data (T3). Update information on service users was provided by services leads and on how the RHP was progressing. Although the data monitoring systems that had been introduced at baseline had not been
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IMPLEMENTATION EVALUATION OF A PEER SUPPORTIVE HOUSE IN THE MONCTON AT HOME/CHEZ SOI PROJECT

IMPLEMENTATION EVALUATION OF A PEER SUPPORTIVE HOUSE IN THE MONCTON AT HOME/CHEZ SOI PROJECT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY At Home/Chez Soi is a complex community-based intervention using a Housing First model for addressing issues of homelessness in people with severe and persistent mental illness. The At Home/Chez Soi Demonstration Project, sponsored by the Mental Health Commission of Canada, is implemented in 5 cities across Canada, namely Moncton, Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver. As part of the Housing First program in Moncton, a Peer Supportive House was created in order to house participants who experienced multiple evictions over their participation in the program. A secondary goal of the Peer Supportive House was to house participants who needed emergency housing while waiting for an independent apartment to become available. The hope was that the Peer Supportive House would help participants stabilize enabling them to move into regular housing on a permanent basis. In-person interviews were conducted with clients, superintendents and key informants involved in the Peer Supportive House in Moncton.
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A house at home with nature

A house at home with nature

For Interior or Pocket Sliding Doors used within the home, a new flat sill which is level with the floor.. Contin¬.[r]

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House and Home Expenditures

House and Home Expenditures

©2015 Esri Page 1 of 3 Data Note: The Spending Potential Index (SPI) is household-based, and represents the amount spent for a product or service relative to a national average of 100...[r]

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House Bill 5020 Ordered by the House March 7 Including House Amendments dated March 7

House Bill 5020 Ordered by the House March 7 Including House Amendments dated March 7

(e) $990,744 to the Confluence Project to finance a portion of the costs incurred for the Confluence Project at the Celilo Park site. (3) The Legislative Assembly finds that the use of lottery bond proceeds will create jobs, further economic development, finance public education or restore and protect parks, beaches, watersheds and native fish and wildlife, and is authorized based on the following findings:

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