Top PDF Meanings of the Sabbath for Worship in the Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Meanings of the Sabbath for Worship in the Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Meanings of the Sabbath for Worship in the Seventh-Day Adventist Church

This study investigates the meanings and significance of the seventh-day Sabbath for worship in the Seventh-day Adventist Church. In recent years, both the day and concept of Sabbath have attracted ecumenical attention, but the focus of scholarship has been placed on Sunday as the Lord’s Day or Sabbath with little consideration given to the seventh-day Sabbath. In contrast, this project examines the seventh-day Sabbath and worship on that day from theological, liturgical, biblical and historical perspectives. Although not intended as an apology for Seventh-day Adventist practices, the work does strive to promote a critical and creative conversation with other theological and liturgical traditions in order to promote mutual, ecumenical understanding.
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A Biblical Training Model To Improve The Financial Literacy Of The Members Of The Roundup-Lewistown District Of The Seventh-day Adventist Church

A Biblical Training Model To Improve The Financial Literacy Of The Members Of The Roundup-Lewistown District Of The Seventh-day Adventist Church

collapse due to a forgotten covenant relationship is found in the New Testament gospels (Matt 21:12-17; Mark 11:15-19; Luke 19:45-48; John 2:13-16). This is the story of Jesus Christ’s being angry about sellers, buyers, and moneychangers doing business on holy ground that is the Temple. John 2:13-16 provides an additional detail and places the time of this narrative at the time of the Passover. This date of the 15th of the first month of Nissan in the Jewish calendar (Chabad, 2017) or March-April in the Gregorian calendar was extremely important because it commemorated the exit (and salvation) from Egypt of the Jewish people according to Exodus 12. In verses. 14, 17, and 24-28, a directive seems to be given by Moses to celebrate this date as a memorial of freedom from Egyptian slavery after 430 years (v. 40) of bondage. The narrative continues and notes that God Himself is the actual liberator (Exod 13:21-22; 14:13-15, 18, 25, 30-31). The victory of liberation was celebrated by creating one of the most beautiful biblical poetic passages in the Old Testament (Exod 15). In this poetic song of the redeemed, God becomes the center of identity, purpose, and intimacy within the newly freed Jewish nation. Freedom from oppression (physical subjugation of the Egyptian power structures) and sin (the Jews were now able to worship and keep their own customs and laws such as the Sabbath) became the main premise of celebrating Passover.
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Reasons of How Adventist Pioneers Accepted the Truth about Sabbath (1844-1863)

Reasons of How Adventist Pioneers Accepted the Truth about Sabbath (1844-1863)

Seventh-day Adventist Church (SDA) emerged as a denomination in the nineteenth century amid Sunday‟s observance domination. The majority of the SDA pioneers are Sunday keepers. The seventh-day Sabbath was first brought to the Millerite Adventists by Rachel Oakes. She is a member of the Seventh-day Baptist who joined the Millerite Adventists. The first time the seventh-day Sabbath was introduced in Millerite Adventists, there was upheaval and conflict. But finally, a group of Sabbatarian Adventists was formed which kept the seventh-day Sabbath. This group finally became SDA Church. The purpose of this work is to find out what were the reasons for the Adventists pioneers to accept the Sabbath. This paper argued that there were four reasons why Sabbatarian Adventists received the seventh-day Sabbath. First, the Sabbatarian Adventists kept the seventh-day Sabbath because of their investigation of the Bible, which led them to abandon Sunday observance and accepted the Sabbath. Second, one of the co-founders of the SDA, Ellen G. White, confirmed that the Sabbath is related to the temple in heaven, because the Ten Commandments, including the fourth commandment, still remains there and never been eliminated. Third, the pioneers of the SDA also found that there was a connection between the Sabbath and the three angels‟ messages, in which the issue will be the worship of God and its closely related to the seventh- day Sabbath. Fourth, they saw that Sabbath was related to eschatology. In this understanding, they understood that Sabbath would still be observed in the new world. This paper is a historical approach using documentary research method. For each reasons, researcher utilizes primary resources. Secondary resources are employed only to see current opinions about the issue.
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A Process For Implementing Devotional Patterns For Members Of The San Diego Central Seventh-Day Adventist Church

A Process For Implementing Devotional Patterns For Members Of The San Diego Central Seventh-Day Adventist Church

After inviting members of the church to participate in the project, the first step was to administer a pre-group session survey involving the entire church—the English- speaking congregation. I conducted the first survey test during the announcement period between Sabbath School and the worship time on January 26, 2013. No other activity was going on during the time the survey test was taken, ensuring that all the participants could focus on answering the questions. I calculated the time it would take to answer the survey questionnaire and determined that it would take seven minutes or less. I distributed pencils along with the one-page questionnaire to avoid any delay in looking for writing material and kept the collected questionnaires in a secured place. To further maximize participation, I distributed the questionnaire again the following Sabbath for those who happened to miss church or for whatever reason did not attend church the previous week. This time though, no special time was allotted for answering the questionnaire.
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Feeding holy bodies: A study on the social meanings of a vegetarian diet to Seventh day Adventist church pioneers

Feeding holy bodies: A study on the social meanings of a vegetarian diet to Seventh day Adventist church pioneers

In his essay ‘The culinary triangle’, Lévi-Strauss pointed to the biocultural nature of food, noting that when we cook we culturally transform the raw. Boiling for instance is a double mediation of nature (water) and culture (the receptacle that contains both water and food) (Lévi-Strauss 1997:29) Lévi- Strauss added that ‘cooking is not located entirely on the side of culture’, it adapts ‘itself to the exigencies of the body’. Therefore ‘cooking represents their necessary articulation’ (Lévi-Strauss 1997:33). This cultural transformation of food is for Lévi-Strauss a universal human characteristic at the same fundamental level as language (Lévi-Strauss 1997:28). Barthes took this observation further to the point of equating food to language (Barthes 1979:167–168). In his essay ‘Toward a psychology of contemporary food consumption’, he affirmed that food is a sign in every society (Barthes 1979:168). Food can define, give or recognise the meaning of one person in the tribe: for example, the chief gets the head of an animal or the best food. Such semiotic processes can occur only when there is a previous differentiation of foods (Soler 1979:128). As Soler noted, in the same way that early Christians rejected the Sabbath to differentiate themselves from the Jews, Saint Peter’s vision ‘in which the [already present Jewish] distinction between clean and unclean foods was abolished had thus implied the abolition of the distinction between Jews and non-Jews’ (Soler 1979:137).
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A Compilation of Studies Related to Seventh- day Adventist Youth and Young Adults and their Attitudes toward Spirituality and the Church

A Compilation of Studies Related to Seventh- day Adventist Youth and Young Adults and their Attitudes toward Spirituality and the Church

  We  examine  behaviors  involved  in  family  worship,  how  these  behaviors  cluster  together  into  specific   patterns  of  family  worship,  and  how  these  patterns  of  family  worship  relate  to  the  behaviors  and  beliefs  of   adolescents  attending  Seventh-­‐day  Adventist  schools.  Seven  patterns  of  family  worship  were  detected  by   cluster  analysis  of  questionnaires  completed  by  7,658  Seventh-­‐day  Adventist  youth,  grades  6  through  12.   Worship  patterns  that  actively  involved  youth  in  reading,  praying,  and  sharing  their  religious  experience   were  rated  as  more  meaningful  and  interesting  and  were  associated  with  higher  levels  of  Active  Faith  (a   factor  score).  Youth  in  families  with  worship  patterns  that  did  not  actively  involve  the  youth  were  even   lower  on  Active  Faith  than  youth  whose  families  had  no  worship.  However,  No  Worship  youth  were  highest   on  Materialism/Legalism  and  Alcohol/Drug  Use.  With  one  exception,  worship  patterns  with  high  youth   involvement  were  associated  with  lower  Alcohol/Drug  Use  and  lower  Materialism/Legalism.  Youth  in  the   Shared  Worship  group,  in  which  every  family  member  participated  in  every  phase  of  worship  every  day,   were  high  on  Active  Faith  but  also  relatively  high  on  Materialism/Legalism,  and  Alcohol/Drug  use  suggesting   a  pattern  of  compulsive  behavior.  
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Seventh-day Adventist. Pastor s and Elder s Handbook For Youth Ministry

Seventh-day Adventist. Pastor s and Elder s Handbook For Youth Ministry

If your church is near a public college or university campus, make sure you have an outreach to Adventist students on that campus. This might involve an organized campus club with yourself or the youth pastor/leader serving as sponsor or chaplain. If the Adventist group is not large enough to form a campus club, campus ministry can be as simple as inviting a group of Adventist students to your home for Sabbath dinner or Friday night fellowship on a regular basis or any day during the week. Such invitations will help them to feel connected to the local church, will ease homesickness for those who are far from home and will encourage them to bring non-Adventist friends to your church activities. In this way, your campus ministry can be a true outreach. See Appendix B, pg. 91
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The Trinity in Seventh-day Adventist History Merlin Burt E. G. White Estate Branch Office Andrews University

The Trinity in Seventh-day Adventist History Merlin Burt E. G. White Estate Branch Office Andrews University

We may learn several lessons from the history of the development of the doctrine of the Trinity in the Seventh-day Adventist church. First, we must acknowledge that the development of Adventist biblical theology has usually been progressive and corrective. This is clearly illustrated in the doctrine of the Trinity. The leading of the Holy Spirit is dynamic and not static. Other doctrinal concepts like the time to begin the Sabbath (1855) and tithing (1878) developed in a similar manner. This development never supposed a paradigm shift that contradicted the clear Biblical teaching of the heavenly sanctuary ministry of Jesus and the prophetic foundation of the Church. Second, the development of the doctrine of the Trinity demonstrates that doctrinal change sometimes requires the passing of a previous generation. For Seventh-day Adventists it took over 50 years for the doctrine of the Trinity to become normative. Third, the gift of prophecy helped the church to have confidence and biblical unity on the Trinity. Ellen White’s unambiguous statements subdued controversy and provided confidence in the transition to our current view. Finally, Adventist theology is always supremely dependent upon Scripture. The Bible tells us that the “path of the just [is] as the shining light, that shineth more and more unto the perfect day.” 28 Hebrews 2:1 reads: “Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things we have heard.” It was ultimately the Bible that led Seventh-day Adventists to adopt their present position on the Godhead or Trinity.
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Holistic Christian education for character formation in Seventh-day Adventist Church-sponsored secondary schools in Nyamira County, Kenya

Holistic Christian education for character formation in Seventh-day Adventist Church-sponsored secondary schools in Nyamira County, Kenya

Secular sports activities by the MoEST were mostly conducted during weekends to avoid time wastage in teaching the MoEST curriculum. A higher percentage of students stated that they enjoyed the sports activities and became disillusioned whenever they were not allowed to attend because of the Sabbath. In most cases, as teachers revealed, students threatened to riot for not being permitted to attend. For fear of riots, some principals allowed students to attend the sports activities on Sabbath. In schools where the principals did not allow them to participate, students did not attend the Sabbath proceedings. Sindo (OI; 16:02:2014) blamed this for controversies between the administration and the students. The church as he further observed, needed to sort out the issue with the MoEST to have sports for the SDA- sponsored secondary schools being conducted on Sunday in order for the students to attend church services. This would give students the morale of keeping the Sabbath rest without thinking of the sports activities. It would also lessen student teacher conflicts which resulted from denial to attend sports activities on Sabbath.
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A Comparative Discourse Analysis of the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary\u27s Statement  On the Unique Headship of Christ in the Church  and the Response Statement,  An Open Appeal

A Comparative Discourse Analysis of the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary\u27s Statement On the Unique Headship of Christ in the Church and the Response Statement, An Open Appeal

Also, both texts attempt to convey a strong sense of credibility of their arguments by reiterating phrases such as “Scripture affirms” (the Seminary’s Statement) and “Scripture with Scripture” (the “Open Appeal”). The analysis has partly demonstrated what scholars such as Bultmann, Kaiser and Silva, and Jensen, as well as many other theologians, have long noted concerning the difficulty of being completely objective and impartial in interpreting biblical texts. 37 The number of biblical references does not determine the level of biblicality of an argument. And yet, the sense of interpretive supremacy the “Open Appeal” tries to convey through more frequent, repeated use of terms, such as “carefully” and “clearly,” and through its emphasis on “comparing Scripture with Scripture by consulting the whole Bible,” (lines 237–238) seems problematic when it draws from a narrower range of biblical texts, and the meanings of key terms are fused. In sum, findings of this study suggest that the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s current debate concerning women pastors seems to center not so much on which side interprets the Bible and White’s writings more carefully; the analysis shows that there is no shortage of statements in them for either side to draw from to support its position. Rather, the debate seems to hinge upon how the church defines pastoral leadership and with which theological paradigm it aligns its view of the triune God, who “is infinite and beyond human comprehension.” 38
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Education as the Heart of Ellen White\u27s Missional Vision for the Seventh-day Adventist Schools: The Australian Context

Education as the Heart of Ellen White\u27s Missional Vision for the Seventh-day Adventist Schools: The Australian Context

The integration of education and misson was already part of Ellen White’s vision for schools before her nine-year ministry in Australia. The establishment of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Australia between 1885 and 1890 intersected with a strong sense of missional commitment among the early converts. Haskell observed, “This spirit of personal labour for their friends was a marked characteristic of the Australian Sabbath-keepers. Their earnestness and zeal was great; they left no stone unturned to reach their friends and neighbours.” 21

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Doers of the Word: Seventh day Adventist Social Christianity in Thought and Practice during the Gilded Age

Doers of the Word: Seventh day Adventist Social Christianity in Thought and Practice during the Gilded Age

business activity for quite some time due to illness. When he found out about the way that the Western Health Reform Institute had been established and that it was a money-making enterprise, he weighed in his own opinion of how it should be operated. Recalling what he was told of the situation, Dr. Kellogg reports of Elder White, “And he said, Brethren, it is not right to have this dividend plan. This money ought to be used for the poor. If there are any earnings here, they should be used for the poor; they should not be used to make money out of this enterprise. So he brought the matter before the stockholders, and the stockholders voted to devote the earnings to the poor.” Additionally, Elder White, who ran the flagship publication of the church the Advent Review and Sabbath Herald published a statement in the paper “to the effect that this new plan had been entered upon, and if there was anybody who did not like this plan, and was not satisfied with it, to just call for their money and they would get it. Some of them called for their money, and it was paid back to them.” 67
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Cross-Cultural Perspectives on College Students Beliefs, Values and Spirituality at Seventh-day Adventist Institutions

Cross-Cultural Perspectives on College Students Beliefs, Values and Spirituality at Seventh-day Adventist Institutions

Lee (2002) analyzed 4,000 freshman students on 76 four-year campuses in 1994 and surveyed them again as seniors in 1998 and found that 48% of the students didn‟t present any change in their religious values during the college years, in contrast with 38% who did report increases in the strength of their convictions (Pascarella and Terenzini, 2005, p. 285). Another finding is the work of Professor Tim Clydesdale (2006) who proposes that the religious beliefs of most college students neither increase nor decline while in college and becomes a part of their identity “lock box”. This “lock box” protects various aspects of their identity from tampering that might affect the holder‟s future entry into the American cultural mainstream. Yet, his findings suggest that while not all students use the lock box, most do because they don‟t view religion as particularly relevant to their current stage as college students. Braskamp (2007) disagrees with the “lock box” theory and claims that students do not leave their personal values and faith as they enter college, but rather develop new forms of religious and spiritual engagement. For example, students in different campuses may change from traditional forms of worship (such as formal church attendance) into a more inclusive and diverse set of meditation and practice.
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Perceptions of the Mission of the Church Outlined by Teachers in North American Seventh-day Adventist Schools

Perceptions of the Mission of the Church Outlined by Teachers in North American Seventh-day Adventist Schools

There is a significant gap (40%) between the number who see these three goals as important and the next group of ranked goals. ‘Provision of meaningful worships services’ as the next highest ranked goal is somewhat surprising given the idea of worship did not rank in the top ten themes from question 4. However, the way the question is worded to highlight the ideas of aim or a purpose rather than the mission of the Church likely impacts this rating. The word “aim” is broader and more likely to get respondents thinking about their own experience than the word “mission” which is often very externally focused. Worship services are where meaningful connection with the Church occurs for many members and so are a natural internal focus.
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A Case Study of the Culturally Diverse Worship at the Florida Hospital Seventh-Day Adventist Church

A Case Study of the Culturally Diverse Worship at the Florida Hospital Seventh-Day Adventist Church

they sang a great hymn of the faith that was so precious to him and a current worship song that his grandson was passionate about. It is in a story like this that we see the spirit of the Shema. In Deuteronomy, when Moses has assembled the Israelites and is giving them final instructions, he says "Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength. These commandments that I give you today are to be on your hearts. Impress them on your children. Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up" (Duet. 6:5-7). When we sing what we believe with our children (and grandchildren), we impress on them the scriptural message that can work their way inside them in a different way than just speaking them.
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When, Where, and Why did the Change from Sabbath to Sunday Worship Take Place in the Early Church?

When, Where, and Why did the Change from Sabbath to Sunday Worship Take Place in the Early Church?

as an illustration of this point: “There is no scriptural evidence of the change of the Sabbath institution from the seventh to the first day of the week. . . . What a pity that it [Sunday] comes branded with the mark of paganism, and christened with the name of the sun-god, then adopted and sanctified by the papal apostasy, and bequeathed as a sacred legacy to Protestantism.” Edward T. Hiscox, Sermon at Baptist Ministers’ Convention, Saratoga, NY, August 20, 1893, as cited by Charlene R. Fortsch, Daniel: Understanding the Dreams and Visions (British Columbia: Prophecy Song, 2006), 363. In more recent times, most of the millions who avidly read Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code (London: Corgi, 2003) found the reconstruction of early Christianity in it plausible. Indeed, for many of them, it is the only full-scale reconstruction of early Christian history they have considered carefully. Thus, if only for the impact this book has had on the wider public, the following claims are worth noting: “ . . . by fusing pagan symbols, dates and rituals into the growing Christian tradition, he [Constantine] created a kind of hybrid religion that was acceptable to both parties” (p. 314); and “. . . Christianity honoured the Jewish Sabbath of Saturday, but Constantine shifted it to coincide with the pagan’s veneration day of the sun” (pp. 314-315).
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Biblical Perspective of Music and Worship: Implications for the Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Biblical Perspective of Music and Worship: Implications for the Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Again, the NT recognizes the use of music in private worship as Mary sung in her heart. In other words, as the use of music is crucial in cooperate worship so it is in private worship. As the Adventist Church gives a conscious consideration to music in worship, the individual members of the Church should be encouraged and taught to employ music to worship in their private homes and to their daily lives. In this case, sacred music should be encouraged. When this is heeded to, it would reduce the individual church member‟s exposure and influence to secular music. Also, in the OT, the use of music in worship was handled by a qualified musician (s). This implies that the Adventist Church in all its use of music in worship services should be led and handled by a well-trained musician (s). In this case, anytime music is being used in any worship services of the Adventist Church, a musician or musicians should stand in front of the congregation and lead out the singing by ensuring that the right tune is used and that all stanzas of the hymn would be sang. When this is heeded to, the case where, sometimes, each member or a group of church members would be singing in his or their own tune would become a thing of the past.
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IMPACT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS SUCCESS DIMENSIONS ON SYSTEMS EFFECTIVENESS: A CASE OF SUNPLUS ACCOUNTING PACKAGE WITHIN THE ZIMBABWE UNION CONFERENCE OF THE SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH

IMPACT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS SUCCESS DIMENSIONS ON SYSTEMS EFFECTIVENESS: A CASE OF SUNPLUS ACCOUNTING PACKAGE WITHIN THE ZIMBABWE UNION CONFERENCE OF THE SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH

Financial Reports are one by-product of an accounting system. A good accounting system, by the church standards: will enable the Chief Financial Officers to produce these reports efficiently, without additional editing and reorganizing of the underlying data, and in a format that will be understandable to the average well-informed reader. In addition, the reports should comply with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and conform to the standards of uniformity required for statistical comparison with the reports of other denominational organizations (SDAAM, 2011). SunSystems 3.6 is one package that the church widely deployed as a standard to its entities. It was DOS-based, with the typical black prompt. It required extensive adaptations and had no maintenance contract from the source code seller. It could not handle large volumes of data and had some compatibility issues. To a non-computer versant user, integration with other office programs was not so seamless, requiring some tinkering and tricks. The ‘not-so-user-friendly’ interface did not help its acceptability too. Thus, in the 4th quarter of 2002, the World Church began the rollout of SunPlus to its entities. It was hoped that this would see an improvement in the quality of financial reports, reduce the workload of treasury staff, enhance comparability and reduce the time needed for report generation. As of November 2012, ZUC officially has 20 entities that use SunPlus as their Accounting package (ZUC – Mid-Year Report, 2012).
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Andrews University. School of Education A SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST SPANISH CURRICULUM FOR GRADES 1-4

Andrews University. School of Education A SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST SPANISH CURRICULUM FOR GRADES 1-4

The following curriculum has been written for our Seventh-day Adventist elementary schools. It is an established fact that language is most easily learned in the early years and the mastery of a language requires a minimum of seven to eight years of intensive study. In view of this many elementary schools in the North American Division are including foreign languages in their regular curriculum. Being that Spanish is the second most common language in the United States and spoken in twenty other countries, it is an important language to know.

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The influence of changes on historical standards in selected urban Seventh-Day Adventist churches in Kenya

The influence of changes on historical standards in selected urban Seventh-Day Adventist churches in Kenya

Ellen G. White (known as Ellen Gould Harmon before marriage) and her twin sister Elizabeth were born on November 26, 1827, to Robert and Eunice Harmon at their farm in Gorham, Maine, USA (Jemison 1955, 203). She was an active member of the Methodist Church; she and her father’s family got attracted to William Miller’s preaching about the nearness of the end of the world (Irwin 1999, 29-30, White 2000, 17-18). Her life as a school-going child was cut off at age nine when she was hit by a rock thrown at her by a classmate (Knight 1996, 13-14; White 2000, 15). She spent a considerable amount of time as a patient at home and never continued with her studies after several failed attempts in the three years that followed the accident (Ellen G. White Estates, 2012, CD-ROM, EGW Biography 2012).
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