Top PDF Medical Education, Training & Research. HSE Strategy

Medical Education, Training & Research. HSE Strategy

Medical Education, Training & Research. HSE Strategy

This report makes wide-ranging recommendations to ensure that the postgraduate education of doctors is based on coherent integrated educational policies, features a reformed governance structure and performs at the highest possible international standard, in order to produce the specialist manpower requirements of a changing health service. Such a system would also be responsive to the flexible training needs of postgraduate doctors and their specialist trainers. The executive summary recommends major involvement of the HSE in postgraduate education. There are explicit recommendations to the HSE to establish “a robust medical education structure (HSE-MET)”. Special emphasis was laid on ensuring that the HSE-MET structure “should have sufficient independence to avoid the risk of being overwhelmed by service pressures”, and that it “should also have a strong role in the governance of medical education and training”. The Report suggests important additional roles for HSE-MET, including that it “should facilitate the integration and streamlining of undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing medical education/continuing professional development by developing evidence-based implementation strategies, plans and outcome measures, so as to ensure that students progress from competence to proficiency in their careers in a multidisciplinary setting at the different levels of training”. Following the publication of the Buttimer Report the CEO of the HSE, Professor Brendan Drumm, set up the current HSE-METR Committee to recommend, inter alia, the future organisation of HSE-METR functions envisaged and recommended in the Buttimer Report.
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A training and education program for genome medical research coordinators in the genome cohort study of the Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization

A training and education program for genome medical research coordinators in the genome cohort study of the Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization

To summarize, in our TMM study, we emphasized the importance of face-to-face ICP in order to improve overall understanding among participants. Some studies use elec- tronic consent, with no face-to-face assistance [14, 15]. A recent prospective randomized study showed that the use of multimedia modules such as slide presentations with narrative tools take more time to complete, but improve the overall understanding of participants compared with face-to-face explanation [16]. This finding suggests that the use of multimedia during the ICP is efficient in certain projects requiring one off consent and collection of bio- logical samples; however, to build a relationship of trust for long-term follow-up studies like the TMM study, face- to-face communication is thought to be more beneficial. We are now conducting secondary assessments of our participants via physiological testing in seven community support centers. ToMMo GMRCs are not only expected to collect physical/blood data, but are also required to contact participants for re-visits and talk with participants in order to diminish anxiety during assessment. In a previ- ous study, it was shown that participants with low overall motivation or motivation fueled by money/gifts tend to have more concerns and a poorer understanding of a long-term cohort study, potentially increasing the risk of dropout [17]. It was also reported that the experience of consenters affected the willingness of patients enrolled in a university-based cancer center tissue repository during follow-up and future research [18]. Communication be- tween experienced ToMMo GMRCs and participants is therefore very important in maintaining or even Table 6 Overall understanding of lectures related to genetics and epidemiology and ToMMo GMRC practice, respectively
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An economical strategy for early medical education in ultrasound

An economical strategy for early medical education in ultrasound

Mainstream inclusion of ultrasonography as a core com- ponent of undergraduate medical education has been slow due to curricular time constraints, high cost of ultrasound equipment, and a lack of sufficient faculty skilled with ultrasound [13]. The inundated state of medical school curricula has been a central topic of discussion within the academic community for the past hundred years [19]. Matters have exponentially worsened in this regard as medical science has advanced and generated more for stu- dents to learn [20, 21]. This concept makes the thought of finding a place for even eight weeks of ultrasound training a daunting task for medical schools, despite the many valuable applications of this technology. Additionally, a lack of proper faculty training, coupled with high costs of equipment and instruction, deter programs from making ultrasound training mainstream in medical schools [11]. A few of the programs teaching ultrasound to medical stu- dents have arranged instruction to follow and augment the pertinent lessons in anatomy, physiology, and physical exam [1]. These early courses in ultrasound have been proven to increase students’ competence and confidence in using ultrasound [11]. However, specific standards for evidence-based methods in teaching ultrasound at the undergraduate level have yet to be defined [11].
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Interactional skills training in undergraduate medical education: ten principles for guiding future research

Interactional skills training in undergraduate medical education: ten principles for guiding future research

The widespread use of evaluations of satisfaction is particularly disappointing as medical schools typically use a variety of assessment techniques to assess know- ledge and skill acquisition in other domains. These in- clude written examinations, assessments from supervising physicians, or direct observation [26]. Direct observation may involve a supervising physician directly observing an interaction with a patient, reviewing a video tape of a consultation, or undertaking a clinical simulation [26]. Clinical simulations typically use actors to simulate patients within specific scenarios known as Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) [26]. The student’s performance is rated against a check- list by the simulated patient or an observer. OSCEs have been developed to assess interactional skills in breaking bad news, disclosing a medical error, handling a disrup- tive patient, and dealing with a phone call for a narcotics refill [27]. The key advantage of simulations is that they enable students to demonstrate the application of know- ledge and skills to a clinical scenario. Methodological limitations, however, include reactivity whereby students may perform differently under exam conditions com- pared to how they would in day-to-day clinical interac- tions with patients. One potential way of eliminating the impact of reactivity is the use of simulated patients to assess skills where the student is unaware that the pa- tient is “simulated”. While not commonly used in med- ical education, this type of assessment may provide a better indication of the extent to which the student is able to apply skills in real world contexts.
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Medical Research Education in Europe

Medical Research Education in Europe

Researchers should be able to remain independent when choosing research career paths that best suit their skills, preferences and opportunities, and they should also be able to develop their careers at locations that prove to be the most attractive. The design and assess- ment of research careers must incorporate transparency, fairness and an equal-opportunities approach, ensuring that gender, age and all other types of social diversity features are respected. European funding schemes such as the Marie Curie Initial Training Networks (FP7)3 and Erasmus Mundus4 should be promoted and further supported with sustainable funds, and ideally linked to similar initiatives at national and regional levels.
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Mbarara University Research Training Initiative: a spin-off of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative in Uganda

Mbarara University Research Training Initiative: a spin-off of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative in Uganda

The overall aim of the MURTI program is building capacity of junior faculty so that its members become the next generation of researchers in Africa, who will conduct locally relevant research that contributes to improved health with the follow- ing specific aims: 1) developing research expertise of junior faculty in HIV prevention and treatment, particularly in rural southwestern Uganda; 2) building the capacity of Ugandan junior faculty to develop novel, evidence-based diagnostic and treatment strategies for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in rural populations to address priority health needs in this area; 3) preparing junior faculty for research careers address- ing mental health disorders in rural Uganda; and 4) equipping junior faculty with the administrative ability, research ethics, and research communication capacities necessary to succeed as the next generation of independent investigators in Uganda.
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Economic Modelling and the National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training

Economic Modelling and the National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training

The level of aggregation in MONASH reflects the data available in Australia to support an economy-wide model. Increasing the amount of detail included in the model will depend on accessing new data sources. As it turns out, the recent purchase of the Commodity Details matrix from the 1989-90 input-output table by COPS will alleviate some of the current aggregation problems, especially in the service sector. Beyond that, progress will require a significant research effort to determine the cost and sales shares of ITAB sectors not separately identified in the input-output table. The effort required is likely to be significant because the more readily available sources of data have already been accessed. However, such projects are potentially very important to the National VET Strategy because they offer opportunities for collaborative research between the MONASH modellers, officers of ANTA and officers of the interested ITABs. That is, they are capable of providing a vehicle for establishing the linkages necessary for the MONASH system to realize its potential as a planning framework for the ITABs.
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Education and Professional Training of Undergraduate Medical Students Abroad

Education and Professional Training of Undergraduate Medical Students Abroad

At present there are at least twenty medical schools within the EU which offer training on “English Parallel” courses. New courses appear each year and the number expands with the expansion of the EU, most recently through the admission of Croatia. In addition there are many such schools in candidate countries, such as Turkey, Ukraine and Armenia. Almost two thousand such graduates registered to practice in the UK up until 2005 with a significant expansion after the admission of Central and Eastern European countries to the EU. Conservative estimates would indicate that there may be 2000 medical students with British citizenship on such courses. Graduation gives automatic entitlement to practice throughout the EU. However, there is limited knowledge of these students and no monitoring or support is offered to them. We have no data on “drop-out” rates or failure rates. We have data limited to medical student blogs on the difficulties which they may experience. Concerns about an adverse impact on their assessment limit readiness to take part in qualitative research (3). This paper suggests the need for formal involvement of the GMC and the Irish Medical Council in the identification and support of these students. Such an approach would allow more formal studies and would ensure appropriate man-power planning. In the past some groups of junior doctors were labeled “the lost tribe”. (44) Such a title befits this group of students.
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Dutch senior medical students and disaster medicine: a national survey

Dutch senior medical students and disaster medicine: a national survey

Senior medical students (last 2 years of the 6 years of medical education) of the eight medical faculties that provide full medical training in The Netherlands were invited through their faculty and/or social media to complete an online survey (Survey Monkey, Palo Alto, California USA) on Disaster Medicine, training and knowledge. The survey (see Additional file 1: Figure S1) consisted of demographic data, prior education and self- estimated knowledge on and capability to deal with sev- eral disaster scenarios as well as their willingness to work in these circumstances. Scores were given on a scale from 0 to 10. This reported knowledge was tested by a mixed set of 10 theoretical questions and practical cases, each correct answer valuing 1 point out of 10. The survey was developed at the Center for Research and Edu- cation in Emergency Care (CREEC) at the University of Leuven based upon literature data and validated by several disaster specialists from the network of the CREEC and the Leuven University Disaster Management Course (joint venture with the Belgian Military and the Flemish Society of Emergency Nurses).
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Medical Education in Ireland : A New Direction, Report of the Working Group on Undergraduate Medical Education and Training

Medical Education in Ireland : A New Direction, Report of the Working Group on Undergraduate Medical Education and Training

The Department of Health and Children has endeavoured to assess the future staffing requirements of the health service and to estimate the number of EU medical graduates required to meet this demand. Given the many variables involved, it is difficult to predict future requirements with absolute certainty. However, based on the findings of the National Task Force on Medical Staffing and supported by work undertaken by the FÁS Skills and Labour Research Unit and by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) in relation to population projections, the Department of Health and Children has estimated that an annual intake of between 700 and 740 EU students is required in order to achieve self-sufficiency and to address the proposed expansion of the consultant and primary care workforce envisaged in the Health Strategy. Furthermore, in the context of the radical reform of the health service currently underway, there is a need to educate doctors in Ireland to work in the environment of the Irish health service in order to achieve and sustain a consultant-delivered hospital service and an expanded primary and community care service.
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Medical education research in GCC countries

Medical education research in GCC countries

The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries are the Arab states of the Gulf including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, United Arab Emirates and Oman. GCC was founded in May 1981. The total area of GCC coun- tries is 2,673,108 km 2 , with 2.1 trillion economy [1]. These countries are highly blessed with natural resources includ- ing oil and gas with high income advantages. These coun- tries are speedily moving ahead to promote a high-quality education for the citizens and devoted special attention to fostering higher education and research in the country [2]. The excellence of healthcare depends on the competen- cies of the health care professionals. Medical education is the foundation for a high quality health care. It is generally agreed that where training is important there education is vital. It is this education which will enable the medical students to lead and meet the ever-changing requirements of the society. Medical practice will definitely improve by
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Situational judgement tests in medical education and training: Research, theory and practice: AMEE Guide No. 100

Situational judgement tests in medical education and training: Research, theory and practice: AMEE Guide No. 100

On balance, the evidence to date demonstrates that SJTs are a valid, reliable and well- received method for measuring important non-academic attributes, such as empathy, integrity and teamwork. SJTs have been successfully implemented for use in selection across a range of healthcare professions, especially within medical education and training. SJTs have the benefit of having reduced sub-group differences compared to other selection methods, and are well received by candidates. The theoretical basis underpinning SJTs shows they assess individuals’ beliefs about the costs and benefits of expressing certain traits via behaviours in given situations. Future research could extend the emerging evidence relating to the construct validity of SJTs, for example, exploring why there is little effect of socio-economic status and SJT performance (unlike indicators of academic attainment).
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Promoting Education, Mentorship, and Support for Pediatric Research

Promoting Education, Mentorship, and Support for Pediatric Research

Pediatricians play a key role in advancing child health research to best attain and improve the physical, mental, and social health and well- being of all infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. Child health presents unique issues that require investigators who special- ize in pediatric research. In addition, the scope of the pediatric research enterprise is transdisciplinary and includes the full spectrum of basic science, translational, community-based, health services, and child health policy research. Although most pediatricians do not di- rectly engage in research, knowledge of research methodologies and approaches promotes critical evaluation of scienti fi c literature, the practice of evidence-based medicine, and advocacy for evidence- based child health policy. This statement includes speci fi c recommenda- tions to promote further research education and support at all levels of pediatric training, from premedical to continuing medical education, as well as recommendations to increase support and mentorship for re- search activities. Pediatric research is crucial to the American Academy of Pediatrics ’ goal of improving the health of all children. The American Academy of Pediatrics continues to promote and encourage efforts to facilitate the creation of new knowledge and ways to reduce barriers experienced by trainees, practitioners, and academic faculty pursuing research. Pediatrics 2014;133:943 – 949
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Development of a neonatal curriculum for medical students in Zimbabwe – a cross sectional survey

Development of a neonatal curriculum for medical students in Zimbabwe – a cross sectional survey

There has been a call for medical training reform within the college so that graduands are better aligned with the health needs of the country. The award of a Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) Grant to UZCHS by the US government in 2010 was pivotal in driving new medical education initiatives at the college. Partner institutions on this grant included University of Colorado School of Medicine (UCSOM), University of Colorado Denver Evaluation Center (UCDEC), and Stanford University. With collaboration from the US in- stitutions, the Novel Education Clinical Trainees and Re- searchers (NECTAR) program was launched at UZCHS [10]. The NECTAR program sought to improve faculty through medical education courses, research support, and strengthening of both undergraduate and postgradu- ate courses. A major objective of NECTAR was curricu- lar review and development. This work was formally commenced in 2013. Part of the preparatory activities for this work involved identifying and adopting desired competencies for college graduands. These are: 1) med- ical expert 2) ethical professional 3) scholar 4) commu- nicator/relationship builder 5) community health advocate 6) educator and 7) manager/leader. These com- petencies were based on the CanMeds framework [11]. Similar initiatives have been adopted elsewhere [12, 13].
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Education, Training and Research

Education, Training and Research

Within the HSE, elements of research are conducted throughout the organisation and involve its service providers, in various Directorates and functions. There is a particular need to bring greater alignment and coordination of research activities within the health service. Leadership is crucial to achieving this goal and, as stated earlier in the report, the Committee sees the appointment of a Director of Research in the HSE as an urgently required step towards this objective. The Committee was cognisant of some views which favour the establishment of an entirely separate entity for education, training and research in the health service. However, the Committee was mindful of the recent review of the HSE’s organisational structures, undertaken by McKinsey and accepted by Government, which emphasised the streamlining of HSE structures and the need to curb any proliferation of new structures.
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Clinical leadership development in postgraduate medical education and training: policy, strategy, and delivery in the UK National Health Service

Clinical leadership development in postgraduate medical education and training: policy, strategy, and delivery in the UK National Health Service

(senior leadership roles in organizations), but is also the very important “leading of the micro-systems that have such an effect on care outcomes” (p 483). Leadership in high- performing organizations is not reliant on a charismatic leader; instead it is distributed in nature, where senior leaders define strategy, support execution of strategic initiatives, and engage individuals within the organization to lead on improvement activities. Ensuring that clinical leadership development has an equal weight within postgraduate training programs as clinical skill development is, therefore, essential, if we are to build health organizations with the capability for continual improvement in order that they might better meet the future needs of our patients and local populations.
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<p>Junior-to-junior research interviews as method for clinical practitioner-researchers</p>

<p>Junior-to-junior research interviews as method for clinical practitioner-researchers</p>

There are speci fi c ethical considerations for junior-to- junior interviews. We seek to generate data with our col- leagues about the systems in which we work, and as we will explain the participants are in a vulnerable position. Consideration must be given to this throughout the research process. At the recruitment stage, it must be noted that potential participants are busy people with mul- tiple commitments, eg, junior doctors required to attend to their clinical commitments while on duty, then, when off duty, meet the educational requirements of their postgrad- uate portfolio and study for postgraduate exams. Medical training can be perceived as a hierarchical and competitive structure, 41 and careful consideration must be given to recruitment so that participants do not perceive they are under pressure to take part. The researcher – participant relationship can already provide a power imbalance in favor of the researcher, and we consider it good practice to limit this imbalance as much as possible. In practical terms, this may mean that it is not possible to recruit participants with whom the researcher works directly in the clinical environment, and especially not those with whom the researcher has managerial or supervisor respon- sibility. This can provide dif fi culties if working in more rural geographical locations, where the clinical community is likely to be small and work closely together. In previous qualitative studies, medical students have expressed worry about showing anxiety or concern; perceiving it as a show of weakness that can be potentially stigmatizing for their future career. 42 In recruitment to junior-to-junior inter- views, it should be emphasized that participating will not affect clinical training or employment.
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Evaluation of a new community-based curriculum in disaster medicine for undergraduates

Evaluation of a new community-based curriculum in disaster medicine for undergraduates

General concepts of disaster medicine included 13 lec- tures. In the introduction to disaster medicine lectures, the students received an introductory lecture on disaster medicine, including different key terms and classification and identification of the causes of disasters (man-made and natural) by two approaches: trigger events and speed onset events. In trigger events, the disaster cause can be natural or anthropic. The natural cause can be primary such as in earthquakes or secondary as in floods. An- thropic causes are divided into three subcategories: tech- nical (as in industrial incidents and building collapses), social (as in mass gatherings) and war (conventional, or chemical, nuclear or biological bombing). The second approach is based on the speed of onset of the disaster (slow or progressive) both of them expose the students to both types of disaster (man made and natural) in the lectures of medical aspect of disaster the students fo- cused more about direct and indirect impact of natural disasters such as floods and earthquakes. They applied the principles of disaster management cycle to the Jeddah floods. They were also introduced to the definition and level of complex humanitarian emergencies resulting from violent conflict and compared their effect with the effects of different types of natural disasters such as earth- quake, floods and high winds.
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The barriers and facilitators to the implementation of National Clinical Programmes in Ireland: using the MRC framework for process evaluations

The barriers and facilitators to the implementation of National Clinical Programmes in Ireland: using the MRC framework for process evaluations

All participants cited the importance of the role of Clin- ical Lead as being the “biggest facilitating factor” [Patient Representative] for change. Effective Clinical Leads, des- pite a considerable workload, were dedicated, energetic and enthusiastic overall. The importance of leadership to facilitate “multi-disciplinary interventions” [Clinical Lead 5], and organisational change and quality improvement was widely recognised. Respondents reported that a Clinical Lead should have sufficient high status within their discipline to be a credible source of information, to have subject matter expertise, and be a respected repre- sentative of their peers. “The reason I’m the national Clinical Lead is because I was elected to be President of the [removed to protect identity]. I can go to [HSE CEO] and say I represent my speciality in the country and I think that’s quite a powerful thing. It also helps when I have to go back and talk with the people in my own spe- cialty” [Clinical Lead 5]. The role of the Programme Manager was also cited as being a hugely important sup- portive factor in the NCPs’ success, with many partici- pants viewing the role of the Programme Manager as a leadership role as well: “A key lesson was that the Programme Managers were fantastic, they worked every hour that God gave them because they were managing four or five Programmes. They had the trust of key people, and trust is vital in getting anything done” [HSE Manager 3]. The concept of clinical networks, bringing together clinical and management healthcare profes- sionals, with patient representation was also cited as a major facilitating factor: “To be honest, it works well be- cause all of the stakeholders are together, we all have a place at the table. We have everyone there – the senior Consultants, nurses, management, and we also have a patient too. We are planning, designing, making deci- sions, all together. That is very rare. And I can’t help but feel that is why it works so well. Everyone is ‘inside the tent’.” [Clinical Lead 7].
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International Healthcare Management

International Healthcare Management

Expertise Expertise Information Information Medical Products Medical Products Healthcare Professionals Healthcare Professionals. Medical Education & Research Medical Education & [r]

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