Top PDF Metacognition and self-regulated learning: guidance report

Metacognition and self-regulated learning: guidance report

Metacognition and self-regulated learning: guidance report

Led by the Calderdale Excellence Project, this project had a focus on pupils using cognitive strategies like the mnemonic IPEELL— I ntroductory paragraph, P oints, E xamples and e laboration, E nd, L inks (such as connectives and openers), and L anguage (for example, ‘wow’ words, genre specific vocabulary, punctuation, and self-scoring). The approach explicitly teaches the writing process while encouraging pupils to take ownership of their progress with monitoring and evaluation strategies. Overall, the project appeared to have a large positive impact on writing outcomes in the independently evaluated efficacy trial. The overall effect size for writing—comparing the progress of pupils in the project to similar pupils who did not participate—was +0.74 standard deviations, or an estimated nine months’ additional progress. 13
Show more

32 Read more

The Effects of Self-Regulated Learning Training on Students’ Metacognition and Achievement in Chemistry

The Effects of Self-Regulated Learning Training on Students’ Metacognition and Achievement in Chemistry

Self-regulated learning strategies are critical for students to be able to learn abstract subjects successfully and meaningfully. This article reports on an empirical investigation of the effectiveness of self-regulatory training on secondary school students’ metacognition and achievement in chemistry. A total of 60 students aged 14-15 were randomly assigned into either the experimental group or the control group. Participants in the experimental group completed four self-regulated learning (SRL) exercises based on Zimmerman’s (2002) cyclical model. Data were collected using pre and post self-regulated learning questionnaire (SRLQ), and pre and post reaction rates knowledge test (RRKT). Additional qualitative data were collected through classroom observation and interviews. Quantitative data were analysed using sample independent t-test while thematic analysis was used for the qualitative data. The results revealed that there were significant differences between the two groups in terms of SRL skills, i.e. students in the experimental group scored higher on post-SRLQ. Regarding students’ achievement in chemistry, a slightly greater improvement was found for the students with SRL training than those in the control group. The findings suggested that training in SRL improves students’ achievement in chemistry and therefore should be included in secondary science classrooms.
Show more

15 Read more

Metacognition and Self-regulated Learning in Predicting University Students' Academic Achievement in Turkey

Metacognition and Self-regulated Learning in Predicting University Students' Academic Achievement in Turkey

Does one’s abilities within the skill areas defined within both metacognition and self-regulated learning predict one’s ultimate GPA? Regarding the present study, the answer regarding this possible predictive relationship for pre-service teachers in one Turkish university would appear to be no. The summed scores of pre-service teachers taking the MSIA and the Self-regulated Learning Perception Scale did not show to be predictive of student grade point averages. Within this study, do metacognition scores correlate with participant GPAs? Again, the answer regarding the sample in the present work would appear to be no. This finding supports the work of Sarwar (2009) which found no relationship between metacognition and academic achievement. This result contradicts the findings of Shih Hsu (1997) who found that student metacognitive scores were negatively correlated with academic achievement scores. More recently Guzel (2011) as well as Gul and Shehzad (2012) found a low but significant correlation between metacognition and achievement scores. Clearly, some variation exists within current literature regarding any link between student GPA’s and metacognitive practices.
Show more

7 Read more

The Potentials of Educational Data Mining for Researching Metacognition, Motivation and Self-Regulated Learning

The Potentials of Educational Data Mining for Researching Metacognition, Motivation and Self-Regulated Learning

The triumvirate of motivation, metacognition and self-regulated learning (SRL) offers significant affordances to learning science at the same time as researching these constructs poses substantial challenges. On the side of affordances, these three factors, broadly construed, provide raw material for engineering the bulk of an account about why and how learners develop knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and interests. Add to these factors additional data about a learner’s prior knowledge – its amount, cognitive configuration and retrievability – plus a short list of “primitive” capabilities such as working memory span and inhibition, and it is theoretically plausible to assemble a comprehensive model of learning.
Show more

8 Read more

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ SELF-REGULATED LEARNING

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ SELF-REGULATED LEARNING

This three-phase model of self-regulation has purpose to identify specificmetacognitive processes and motivational sources(Zimmerman & Moylan, 2009, as cited in Hacker, Dunlosky, & Graesser, 2009, p. 305). Acording to Zimmerman and Moylan (2009), metacognition refers to knowledge, awareness, regulation of one’s thinking in which metacognition is not only about competence but it is also about motivation to explain or influence willingness and effort to learn (as cited in Hacker et al., 2009, p. 299). Moreover, student’s efforts to implement self-regulated learning include motivational beliefs and feelings about learning in which this motivational belief influence student’s efforts to learn metacognitively. When the students have learnt metacognitively, they certainly have already implemented self regulated learning as metacognition is component of self-regulated learning (Zimmerman & Moylan, 2009, as cited in Hacker et al., 2009, p. 299). Thus, it can be concluded that motivation has an important role in student’s effort to self-regulate more effectively.
Show more

7 Read more

Cooperative and Self-regulated Learning Styles on Students’ Achievement in Biology

Cooperative and Self-regulated Learning Styles on Students’ Achievement in Biology

On the other hand, SRL is another learning style which became popular in the 1980’s and involves students responsibility by encouraging them to learn by them-selves. SRL is guided by metacognition (thinking about one's thinking), strategic action, and motivation to learn (4). Although almost any student can perform SRL, however it does not mean that all students do take effective charge of their own learning. When faced with a learning task, self-regulated learners typically may analyze and interpret tasks according to their knowledge, set specific goals helping them to achieve their objectives, monitor their own progress through internal feedbacks, readjust their efforts and strategies, use motivational strategies, or loop back through existing strategies to make necessary adjustments in order to attain their goals (5). In other words, they take care of their own learning by coordinating the thinking skills. Therefore, SRL is made up three components which are self- observation, self-judgment, and self-reaction. That is, learners regulate their own learning by observing their own capacity, then compare it with a fixed standard, make judgments about the quality of this performance, and finally make plans about future efforts. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether there is a difference in achievement in Biology between students who learn cooperatively and those who learn through SRL.
Show more

6 Read more

The effect of self regulated learning on high school students’ self efficacy

The effect of self regulated learning on high school students’ self efficacy

Metacognitive: Within the entire process of self-regulated learning, metacognitive is involved and provides a significant contribution on the effective practice of learning. Definition of metacognitive suggested by the expert of Educational Psychology, Franz E. Weinert and Rainer H Kluwe define metacognitive as a cognition of a cognition. In other words, it is a knowledge regarding self-thinking, and cognitive activity has as a process of thinking of the object itself. Metacognitive activity is paramount to monitor and control learning achievement of the learners or the students. Metacognitive knowledge considers what the students know and understand. Additionally, it refers to the individual’s recent thinking, and metacognitive experience deals with individual’s mental or emotional state (Platt, 2016). Metacognition is affected by mental age of the individuals (Nader-Grosbois, 2014). In the age of development, children need good and eloquent communication in translating all the desires and necessities of others. On the other hand, this communication also helps children to obtain a feedback from others who are paramount to help them understand their own cognitive abilities. The research conducted by Chernokova (2014) argues that students can obtain assistance from the others to improve his or her metacognition. Metacognition plays an important role for the individual, particularly the student, in order to attain maximum understanding in learning and obtain maximum learning outcomes. Theoretically, it has been mentioned that metacognition helps the individual in overseeing whether he or she is taking the right path or not. This helps students to obtain personal feedback regarding their progress. The similar argumentatrion is also stated by Mirzaei et al. (2012) in his research which argue that efforts to achieve learning targets will be stronger in helping students to obtain a high GPA, if it is assisted by metacognition. An effort and the achievement of learning targets encourage students to obtain a good GPA, however metacognition gives a greater opportunity to obtain a better GPA.
Show more

6 Read more

The effects of self-regulated learning intervention on students’ motivation in learning history

The effects of self-regulated learning intervention on students’ motivation in learning history

thinking skills are perceived as a critical competence for employment. In the PIPP (National Education Blueprint, 2006-2010), the Minister of Education at that time, Dato’ Sri Hishammudin Tun Hussein urged all parties involved in the educational system to work together to reposition and reengineer the current education system. High quality of teaching and learning process builds on students’ need, experience, character, interests, aspirations, and high expectation of teachers’ subject knowledge. This is a continuous challenge because constructive and effective teaching and learning process in the classroom does not only emphasize on just teaching and curriculum delivery. Students’ cognition, metacognition, motivation, behaviour and learning environment should also be taken into consideration in order to help students learn effectively and perform better in the academic. The teaching professionals need to exercise judgment in meeting such needs when teachers deliver subjects curriculum to students, including subjects such as languages, history, sciences and mathematics.
Show more

96 Read more

Researching Self-regulated Learning and Foreign Language Learning

Researching Self-regulated Learning and Foreign Language Learning

operationalisation of self-regulatory capacity, coming to the conclusion that there is no simple and straightforward definition of the construct of SR. The system of self-regulation comprises a complex, superordinate set of functions…located at the junction of several fields of psychological research” (2005, p. 200). Illustrating this is, for example, a special edition of the Educational Psychology Review devoted to delineating the concepts of metacognition, self-regulation, and self- regulated learning (Alexander, 2008). Here, Dinsmore, Alexander, and Laughlin (2008) reviewed 255 studies from 2003 to 2007 within the field of educational psychology that dealt with one (or more) of these concepts. They point out that although there is a “conceptual core binding the three constructs” (p. 404) they are not synonymous. Broadly speaking, theories of self-regulation focus on the important role of the environment in triggering regulation; metacognition focuses on the mind (cognition) of the individual, while self-regulated learning is concerned with academic
Show more

14 Read more

Reconsidering the Assessment of Self-Regulated Learning in Foreign Language Courses

Reconsidering the Assessment of Self-Regulated Learning in Foreign Language Courses

choosing appropriate goals, and selecting learning activities related to their goals. Using the same learning activity each time was also raised as a common concern. (This is all to be expected, however, as these are precisely the skills that we are presuming most students have not yet fully developed, and this is what we are targeting through the SPG. The extent to which teachers realize and accept this will fundamentally influence their assessment practices, as we shall see in the discussion to come.) While some teachers explained how they tried to provide guidance in choosing more appropriate learning goals and activities, there seemed to be an overall belief, and a general
Show more

18 Read more

Integrating self regulated learning and discovery learning into English lesson plan

Integrating self regulated learning and discovery learning into English lesson plan

There are some research results which present evidences about SRL and school curriculum in the English as foreign language learning setting. In undergraduate level, Hoops et al. (2016) [8] assert it is essential to teach how to learn, rather than only what to learn, meanwhile all faculty members from all disciplines needs training of curriculum development and effective teaching practices that promote student learning and achievement. However, Borg and Al-Busaidi (2012) [13] report that teachers tend to feel a gap between their desire to implement the concept of autonomy and their practices in particular objectives, assessment and materials. Therefore, teachers play a significant role in motivating student’s self-regulation by being a self-regulated teacher (Alsamadani, 2010) [4]. Based on the overview, the concept of SRL in 2013 Curriculum is integrated with Piaget’s cognitive theory about cognitive and Vygotsky’s social constructivist theory in which learners receive more chances to discover and to interpret ideas by themselves (Asri, 2016) [2]. For teaching procedure, modification is required in the element of learning objective, material development, teaching method and assessment.
Show more

6 Read more

Self regulated learning in virtual worlds – an exploratory study in OpenSim

Self regulated learning in virtual worlds – an exploratory study in OpenSim

In the common didactic educational mode students expect the teacher to tell them what to do, how and when to do it, and when to stop doing it – an approach that is open to the criticism that it relies solely on a behaviourist pedagogy where information is transferred from teacher to student rather than cultivating critical, creative and original thinking skills in the learner. Similarly, too much external regulation (forced) can introduce negative results in student centred learning [4]. This is a crucial factor for OpenSim based learning since the advantages of MUVEs that facilitate a range of modern pedagogies recommend only adequate levels of guidance and control and allow students to regulate their learning. Too much external regulation can inhibit the advantage of MUVEs while too little can fail in achieving the learning goals. The research focus of this paper is on this unexplored area in the quest to support academics and students having an effective learning experience in immersive environments.
Show more

8 Read more

Assessment of medical students’ learning and study strategies in self-regulated learning

Assessment of medical students’ learning and study strategies in self-regulated learning

groups based on mean and standard deviation of GPA obtained in university, score for the low GPA (below 14.5), the middle GPA (between 14.5 to17.5), and the high GPA (17.5 to 20). Also, the median scores of ten areas were compared with the median normative score of the students in the United States. The results clearly show the students their strengths and weakness in areas related to strategies learning. Students who have scores below the 50th percentile need guidance and support in learning and study strategies. Students who have scores at 50 to 75 percentile of the normative scores are showing good skills in study and scores above 75 percentile indicate higher skills the students use as to the learning and study strategies (13). The data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software. The significant P value was considered 0.05. Descriptive analysis of the data was carried out using mean, standard deviation, and frequency. In order to compare the quantitative data and determine the correlation of factors, independent t-test, correlation, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post Hoc Tukey tests were used.
Show more

8 Read more

Increasing Self-Regulated Learning Through the LinguaFolio

Increasing Self-Regulated Learning Through the LinguaFolio

The Language Biography section begins with a page requiring students to describe their in- volvement with all languages with which they have had experience. This includes travel to places where the target language is spoken or contact with people from foreign countries where the target language is spoken. Next, stu- dents are required to self-report the strategies they employ to improve various aspects of their language ability (vocabulary, pronunciation, lis- tening skills, etc.). This is done in a three-step process: first, student responses are elicited for the strategies they use; second, students read a long list of activities they could perform to im- prove; and finally, students must assess how often they engage in various strategies. This section provides students the opportunity to ex- plore their goals for learning the language by thinking about the kinds of things they can do with language and engaging in an investigation of the strategies they are using/could be us- ing to learn the language in order to meet those goals. The goal is that students not only reflect on what they currently do to learn the language, but also become aware of other strategies for learning.
Show more

19 Read more

Motivation and Self-Regulated Learning: A Multivariate Multilevel Analysis

Motivation and Self-Regulated Learning: A Multivariate Multilevel Analysis

According to Eccles (2009) task value reflects students’ reasons for engagement in a task. Students may value tasks or domains such as math, out of enjoyment (i.e., intrinsic value) or for its instrumental roles to achieve future goals (i.e., instrumental/utility value) or for its consistency with one’s identity (i.e., attainment value). The current study considers only intrinsic value and instrumental value due to availability of such variables in PISA 2003 data. While intrinsic value is similar to interest (Renninger, 2010) and intrinsic motivation (Ryan & Deci, 2000), instrumental value is akin to identified form of extrinsic motivation (Ryan & Deci, 2000). Although there are some subtle differences between these different labels, because of their intellectual roots, they refer to whether individuals engage in a task for intrinsic or instrumental reasons (Wigfield & Cambria, 2010). According to Wigfield, Hoa and Klauda (2008) the two components of value are hypothesized to have differential effects on self-regulation. Wigfield et al (2008) argued that if students pursue an activity as means to an end (i.e., instrumental value) they would not fully engage in self-regulation as when they “value the activity intrinsically” (p189). An implication of this hypothesis is that students who value a domain for instrumental reasons are likely to use superficial strategies such as memorization than deep and meta- cognitive strategies. Although this may be true, much of the research in support of the role of task value comes from studies that examined composite task value (i.e., composite of intrinsic, utility and attainment values) Thus, we do not know the differential roles of intrinsic vs. instrumental value in predicting SRL strategies (Wigfield, et al., 2008). Nevertheless, a number of studies that investigated the relations between composite task value and various self-regulation strategies found that student who attach value to a task are more likely to report the use of cognitive and meta-cognitive strategies learning strategies in that particular task (e.g., Berger & Karabenick, 2011; Pintrich & DeGroot, 1990; Wolters & Pintrich, 1998). Although Berger and Karabenick’s (2011) did not investigate the relative effects of task value across the memorization, elaboration and control; the correlations reported in their study (based on wave I data) show that task value has stronger association with elaboration and control (meta-cognition) than memorization. This suggests that intrinsic value and utility value may be differentially associated with the three strategies considered in the current study.
Show more

11 Read more

Understanding Self-regulated Learning: Thoughts from Attending the Self-Regulated Learning Symposium in Shimonoseki

Understanding Self-regulated Learning: Thoughts from Attending the Self-Regulated Learning Symposium in Shimonoseki

Providing instruction and support at a suitable level for learners was a theme which was returned to in the closing discussion of the first day. Many participants admitted to struggling with this issue, especially in larger classes where one-to-one support is rarely possible, such as the course described by Martin Mullen and Chris Fitzgerald, from Meisei University, in their presentation on the teacher’s role in fostering learner autonomy. Even in my work as an advisor, where I do have the opportunity to work with individual learners, it can often be very difficult to gauge the degree of guidance suitable for each student at each stage in their learning. In addition to different approaches being employed for learners at different stages, individual advisors and teachers also differ in their approaches, and while there may be a general consensus in much of the literature to avoid too much prescription, from the
Show more

7 Read more

SELF-REGULATED LEARNING IMPLEMENTED BY THE STUDENTS OF VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

SELF-REGULATED LEARNING IMPLEMENTED BY THE STUDENTS OF VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

According to Zimmerman (2002, p.66), self-regulated learning is an activity which is proactively made by the learners, means that they are aware of their strength and limitations. While, according to Schunk & Zimmerman (1989) self-regulated learning is the degree in which the learners are metacognitively, motivationally, and behaviorally active participants in their learning process. There is now an extensive effort to include motivational constructs along with metacognitive processes in models of self-regulated learning (Schunk & Zimmerman, 2007) as cited in Zimmerman & Moylan (2009, p.299). To achieve an academic goal in self-regulation processes, there are self-directed feelings, thoughts, and also behavior. The students or the learners can modify, sustain, and instigate their goal-directed actions which are part of self-regulated learning. The students can practice this strategy for their academic studies. Most importantly, self- regulated learners also manipulate their learning environments to meet their needs (Kolovelonis, Goudas, & Dermitzaki, 2011) as cited in Sharon Zumbrunn, et al (2011, p.7). However, according to (Zimmerman & Kitsantas, 2005) as cited in English, M. C. & Kitsantas, A. (2013, p.129) Self-regulated learners are able to set goals, plan a course of action, select appropriate strategies, self-monitor, and self- evaluate their learning. They are also intrinsically motivated to learn and report high self-efficacy for learning and performance. Besides, Zimmerman & Moylan (2009, p.299) self-regulated learning refers to self-generated thoughts, feelings, and actions for attaining one’s learning goals. By implementing selfregulated learning students will be ready for their lesson in the classroom because they have prepared the material that will be given by the teacher. It also makes the teacher easier to control the students in learning process. In the classroom students demanded to be more active instead of the teacher. If each student implements selfregulated by her/his own, the learning process will run smoothly and get good outcomes.
Show more

10 Read more

Sport access learning (sal) to promote self regulated learning:  a need analysis

Sport access learning (sal) to promote self regulated learning: a need analysis

online learning. Some studies also revealed some barriers related to the applications of blended learning in their schools or universities. One of the negative impressions came from technical field that is related to the server that went down when all students accessed the site at the same time (Gyamfi and Gyaase, 2015). The third component accessed related to blended learning environment in learning consist of participation, usability, acceptance, and composition. Based on the data displayed in Table 1, as many as 75 respondents (67,2%) said that they participated as a student in online learning, while only 15,1% enrolled as teacher. Next component discussed is the usability of blended learning which is found clearly from Table 1 that most participant stated as very useful with more than 70% participants said that. Moving to acceptance of blended learning, the percentage of two categories that are strongly agree and agree almost share the same amount of respondent, while noone said disagree. The next component discussed is the composition. According to the Table 1, there is found that 50% exactly of respondents choosed combination of face to face (50%), online (25%), and offline (25%) to be the best composition in their learning. In contrast, full time face to face learning still be chosen by 33,3% respondents. In general, most respondents agree to choose the fourth composition that combines face to face learning (50%), online (25%), and offline (25%). According to Table 1, the last component displayed is the need of Sport Access Learning (SAL). The first component presents data about the usability of SAL and the second data shows the content of SAL development. Based on the data, it can be seen that as many as 70,8% respondents said that the content of SAL wanted consists of text, audio, video, multimedia interactive, and internet. In addition, two categories that are combination of text, audio, video, and multimedia interactive and combination of text, audio, video, and animation almost split the same number of responses. Support appears through the perception toward mastery of the technology considered at high level by teachers or prospective teachers of sports education (Varol 2014; Herguner, 2016).
Show more

5 Read more

Student Centered Learning Objects to Support the Self Regulated Learning of Computer Science

Student Centered Learning Objects to Support the Self Regulated Learning of Computer Science

Understanding: This dimension describes how the learner progresses toward understanding information. Sequential learn- ers prefer following a logical, step-by-step linear approach, whereas global learners prefer to absorb the learning materials randomly, in large jumps, without following a step-by-step approach, until they grasp the full picture. Global learners can fix a complex problem once they grasp the full picture, but they might encounter difficulties when attempting to describe how they solved it. Courses are normally taught according to a se- quential presentation format. Sequential learners can learn ef- fectively under this method of instruction if they attempt to connect the learning materials logically and develop outlines for the lectures by consulting their teachers or references. Global learners need to grasp the full picture before going into the details; therefore, it may be helpful for them to skim through the content of each chapter or unit of study to gain an overview and try to link the new content to something they already know.
Show more

11 Read more

The Effectiveness of Blended Learning in  Improving Media Literacy on Different Self-Regulated Learning

The Effectiveness of Blended Learning in Improving Media Literacy on Different Self-Regulated Learning

observed by lecturers. In this case, we need trust, confidence, and independence. These three values need to be strengthened to students so that they can truly achieve their learning goals independently. According to Zimmerman (1989), three aspects that influence each other in improving the effectiveness of a learning are 1) influence from inner self, the belief that someone is capable to do and the knowledge they have to progress and develop, 2) the influence of behavior indicated from the ability to observe, assess, and perform, 3) the influence of the environment, which gives chance for students to interact and socialize in diverse communities with interactive and dynamic communication patterns. These three things become capitals in practicing activities in blended learning. In this research, these three components have been applied effectively, both at the beginning of learning when students studied online for the first time, students were given an explanation so that they could truly be independent and were able to occupy the learning environment effectively and efficiently. The students’ ability to choose and sort out suitable media for their needs shows a positive trend and the fact that media literacy was good enough to regulate themselves, and that self-regulation is good learning has a positive effect on students in conducting online learning practices. It can be seen when students were connected with cyberspace, that they focused more on searching material and eliminating activities that were not related to the substance of learning in blended learning. Effects of interaction between learning methods and self-regulated learning on student media literacy
Show more

9 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...