Top PDF MINISTRY OF COMMUNITY, ABORIGINAL AND WOMEN'S SERVICES

MINISTRY OF COMMUNITY, ABORIGINAL AND WOMEN'S SERVICES

MINISTRY OF COMMUNITY, ABORIGINAL AND WOMEN'S SERVICES

Voted Appropriations Description: This sub-vote provides for the offices of the Minister of Community, Aboriginal and Women's Services, the Minister of State for Immigration and Multicultural Services and the Minister of State for Women's and Seniors' Services including salaries, benefits, allowances, operating and other expenses of the ministers' staff. The sub-vote also provides for executive direction and administrative services for the operating programs of the ministry, including financial administration and budget coordination, strategic and business planning and reporting, information and privacy, records management, human resources, office management and accommodation, and information systems. Recoveries are received from internal and external parties for ministry services.
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ECONDARY UITES. A Guide For Local Governments. Ministry of Community, Aboriginal and Women s Services. Housing Policy Branch. Revised September 2005

ECONDARY UITES. A Guide For Local Governments. Ministry of Community, Aboriginal and Women s Services. Housing Policy Branch. Revised September 2005

In the revised code, a suite is defined as a smaller dwelling unit located within a house designed for single-family occupancy. Buildings other than houses (such as apartments) cannot have secondary suites. A house can have only one secondary suite and it cannot be strata titled. Secondary suites must occupy less than 40 per cent of the habitable floor space of the house, to a maximum area of 90 square metres (968 sq. ft.). Licensing. Section 15 of the Community Charter provides broad licensing authority as part of municipal regulatory authority. Municipalities can require licensing for secondary suites should they choose (eg. through a business license). In doing so, various due process requirements apply (eg. those under Section 60 of the Community Charter). In addition, Section 59 of the Charter provides authority for a municipality, by bylaw, to require operators of premises in which rooms or suites are let for living purposes to maintain a register of persons living there.
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Addressing unresolved tensions to build effective partnerships: lessons from an Aboriginal cancer support network

Addressing unresolved tensions to build effective partnerships: lessons from an Aboriginal cancer support network

The Network operated in a regional town in Western Australia and provided support to Indigenous women affected by cancer and their families. The Network was widely acknowledged to have been successful in con- necting families with cancer needs with existing ser- vices. The Network was perceived to act as a ‘cultural broker’ [6], providing a culturally safe space for women to engage with cancer services and with health promo- tion and screening initiatives. Somewhat in contrast with findings from Shahid and colleagues [5], the re- gional mainstream service providers interviewed had a sound understanding of the life circumstances of Indigenous patients, and they acknowledged that the current model of care in which they operated failed to address the complex health and psychosocial needs of Indigenous cancer patients and their families. There is evidence that patient treatment models that address the social, cultural and treatment needs of Indigenous pa- tients can improve treatment compliance [22]. The Network was perceived as bridging the gap in cancer service delivery and, in this context, its multidimen- sional role might be compared to that of a cancer navi- gator, which has been suggested as an effective strategy to support Indigenous women diagnosed with cancer [10]. A substantial difference with models of navigator programs that are well established and have proved successful in the United States is the commitment to training of community or peer navigators that occurs there [23, 24].
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Women’s social networks and use of facility delivery services for uncomplicated births in North West Ethiopia: a community based case control study

Women’s social networks and use of facility delivery services for uncomplicated births in North West Ethiopia: a community based case control study

Among the network structural variables considered in the study, network size and network homogeneity were significantly associated with SBA utilization. The odds of pregnant women delivering at a facility increased with increasing network size. Similarly, the results revealed that women embedded in homogeneous networks (many of the network members are kin) are more likely to de- liver at a health facility than women embedded in het- erogeneous networks. The results are consonant with earlier studies that reported significant associations be- tween social network structure variables and maternal health services utilization [33, 34]. In their study of the roles of social network structural variables on prenatal care utilization to prevent unforeseen health complica- tions, Clair et al. reported that women embedded within large networks where many of the network members were relatives (homogeneous) were more likely to use the service [32]. Social network structure and content were also found important in explaining women’s service utilization in rural Kenya [34].
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South Australian Women s Health Policy

South Australian Women s Health Policy

Each state, each region and each community must develop health strategies which address these priorities from within their own local context. However, it is critical to ensure strategies developed around these priorities also refl ect and respond to the particular needs of women and their social and environmental conditions. Health Services will be required to demonstrate that services and strategies designed to impact on their community’s main health issues include specifi c responses to women.

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Help bring back the celebration of life: A community based participatory study of rural Aboriginal women’s maternity experiences and outcomes

Help bring back the celebration of life: A community based participatory study of rural Aboriginal women’s maternity experiences and outcomes

In practice contexts health care providers should pur- sue culturally safe care by seeking to infuse their own practice and their practice contexts with the knowledge, skills and actions that help them to (1) practice across cultural differences (i.e. biomedical and Aboriginal knowledge of childbirth) and (2) optimize women’s birthing experiences and perinatal outcomes through a recognition of how both are shaped by historical and on- going colonization, diminished local maternity choices and women’s access to respectful and responsive care that meet their needs. Such practice requires health pro- fessional education that will help providers understand how women’s birth experiences, willingness and ability to access care, and perinatal outcomes are shaped by the social, cultural, political, and economic contexts. Partici- pants emphasized that trainees and faculty must gain knowledge of the impacts of colonization, and they would benefit from learning about how specific commu- nities have enacted effective and culturally safe health initiatives. As one of the community researchers said,
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Community Health Centers of Pinellas, Inc. Women s Health Services Obstetrics & Gynecology

Community Health Centers of Pinellas, Inc. Women s Health Services Obstetrics & Gynecology

The misuse of PHI has been identified as a national problem causing patients inconvenience, aggravation, and money. We want you to know that all of our employees, managers, and doctors continually undergo training so that they may understand and comply with government rules and regulations regarding the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) with particular emphasis on the “Privacy Rule”. We strive to achieve the very highest standards of ethics and integrity in performing services for our patients.

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Participatory research and the empowerment of women: supporting women's practical and emotional needs in a Canadian rural Aboriginal community

Participatory research and the empowerment of women: supporting women's practical and emotional needs in a Canadian rural Aboriginal community

Background This study brings together feminist participatory research, social work practice Canadian Aboriginal My inclinations towards social and community women.. and in British Columb[r]

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Aboriginal Education Services

Aboriginal Education Services

While providing opportunities for Aboriginal students to participate in the off campus Cultural Education Program, Connecting Community, Country & Culture, programs have been documented in photographs and/or film. As a result, a number of early year’s resources have been developed in line with the Early Years Learning

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National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) submission to the Senate Inquiry-Community Affairs References Committee: Inquiry into the effectiveness of the special arrangements for the supply of Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) submission to the Senate Inquiry-Community Affairs References Committee: Inquiry into the effectiveness of the special arrangements for the supply of Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) medicines to Remote Area Aboriginal Health Services (RAAHSs)

‘…compliance like we have never seen before.’ One pharmacist estimated that the rate of ‘pick up’ for repeat prescriptions had improved by 90%. ACCHSs claimed that they had noticed a strong improvement in people’s propensity to return to the service when they needed a new prescription for medications. Particular note was made of the impact of DAAs. For some services, QUMAX had allowed far greater use of Webster Packs etc without placing a financial burden on patients, pharmacies or ACCHSs. It was this increase in DAA use that was thought to lay behind the increased compliance that was being observed.” 21
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Your Court, Your Safety. A guide to going to court and getting help with domestic violence

Your Court, Your Safety. A guide to going to court and getting help with domestic violence

It is important that you talk about this option with a lawyer, court support worker or police officer when you apply for an ADVO. Some areas of NSW have a Staying Home Leaving Violence (SHLV) project. The program gives support and help to women who want to remain safely in the family home or another home of their choice. Contact the Community Services Domestic Violence (DV) Line on 1800 656 463 to see if there is a SHLV project in your area. Property recovery orders A magistrate can also make an order to allow you to recover your property from the defendant, or allow the defendant to collect their property from your home. This kind of order is not intended to resolve disputes about who owns personal property, but it can ensure that items can be recovered without further problems occurring. You, the police, or the defendant can request the order, or the magistrate can decide that it is necessary. The order can specify the items to be collected, the time of collection, and whether the defendant must be accompanied by the police or another person. Such an order does not mean that a person has the right to enter another person’s property by force.
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Women’s Leadership

Women’s Leadership

In addition, each year the government also held the National Women's Day aims to give recognition to women for their contributions to the development and progress of the country. The celebration also provides information and knowledge to the community, especially to the woman about their role that are more challenging in the economic, social, and political field to bring honor to Malaysia. According to Zakaria (2008), in Malaysia, the responsibility was given to the Ministry of Woman, Family, and Community Development to highlight women's issues in the country where the government has allocated RM1.8 million (US$ 0.5 million) for starts in 2001 to RM30.5 million (US$ 8.6 million) in 2005. The provision for this ministry have been increased over the years and in 2014, according to Dato’ Sri Mohd Najib Tun Haji Abdul Razak, Malaysia Prime Minister in his speech for Budget Year 2014, the amount of RM 2.2 billion has been allocated to the Ministry of Woman, Family and Community Development to continue the development programs aimed at woman and family institution. Of the total, the ministry has allocated RM 4.5 million in Budget 2014 for Woman Directors' Programme.
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Overcoming barriers to use of child car seats in an urban Aboriginal community—formative evaluation of a program for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services

Overcoming barriers to use of child car seats in an urban Aboriginal community—formative evaluation of a program for Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services

In response to the identified barriers and facilitators identified in the focus groups and in-depth discussions, re- sources were chosen to ensure high pictorial and inter- active content while conveying clear simple messages about child car seat use and the new law. The resources available included a DVD explaining how child car seats protected children from injury, print material, a height chart and different types of child car seats for demonstra- tion purposes (http://www.thegeorgeinstitute.org/videos/ buckle-up-child-car-restraints) [17, 33]. Training re- sources available through the New South Wales State Government’s road agency were also utilised. These re- sources were distributed to families through the one-on- one interactions with families, were made available to families in the foyer of each ACCHS, and distributed in bags at the community event.
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Sowing the seeds of transformative practice to actualize women’s rights to respectful maternity care: reflections from Kenya using the consolidated framework for implementation research

Sowing the seeds of transformative practice to actualize women’s rights to respectful maternity care: reflections from Kenya using the consolidated framework for implementation research

Central and Western Kenya counties that began in 2011. It engaged a range of community, facility, and policy stakeholders to address the causes of disrespect and abuse during childbirth and promote RMC [18]. The Heshima consortium was led by Population Council (hereafter known as The Council), an international re- search organization with an extended history (since 1960s) of operations research and support for policy and program development in Kenya with particular focus on quality of reproductive (and maternal) healthcare. The Council collaborated with FIDA, co-authors of Failure to Deliver 2007, which highlights issues of mistreatment, and advocates for women’s rights at local and national levels [7]. Heshima’s other key member was the National Nurses Association of Kenya/Midwifery Chapter (here- after known as the Nurse/Midwife Association), a mem- ber of both the International Council of Nurses and International Confederation of Midwives, who empower their members (nurses and midwives) to provide quality care. The project steering committee included represen- tatives of two departments within the Ministry of Health (MoH), the Division of Reproductive Health and the De- partment of Nursing; the Nursing Council of Kenya; and a core group of stakeholders interested in improving ac- cess to quality maternal and newborn health (MNH) care in a rights-based approach.
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Exploring Australian Aboriginal Women’s experiences of menopause: a descriptive study

Exploring Australian Aboriginal Women’s experiences of menopause: a descriptive study

Increasing menopause information and awareness is not only indicated for women. A number of women de- scribed that a loss of libido was often misinterpreted by their partners as that they were having an affair, so ef- forts to increase understanding in men is also needed. Many women admitted there was a lack of communica- tion with their partners when a loss of libido was experi- enced, possibly reflecting a misunderstanding of the changes associated with menopause. In contrast, a mi- nority of women described having an understanding partner and highlighted the importance of their support when coping with menopausal changes. It is therefore suggested that community education may have more benefit if directed towards men as well as women. There is evidence that women who receive education about menopause prior to the transition report a greater sexual interest which has can lead to a healthier relationship benefiting both the women and their partners [35]. This may be explained by women having a sense of relief due to their knowledge and being able to attribute a cause to their loss of libido and developing a more positive ex- pectation that a women’s sex life does not end at meno- pause [35]. While menopause may be traditionally women’s business, there is a growing importance in edu- cating men in such topics, alerting them to possible changes in their partners and the sort of support which they could offer.
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Community based Institutions and empowerment of women

Community based Institutions and empowerment of women

Empowerment of women means to let women survive and let them live a life with dignity, humanity, respect, self-esteem and self-reliance. This will help them to make their own decisions. Nobel Laureate Amartaya Sen. (1993) explains that the freedom to lead different types of life is reflected in the person’s capability set. The capability of a person depends on a variety of factors, including personal characteristics and social arrangements. The World Bank defines empowerment as “the process of increasing the capacity of individuals or groups to make choices and to transform those choices into desired actions and outcomes. Malhotra (2002) constructed a list of the most commonly used dimensions of women’s empowerment, drawing from the frameworks developed by various authors in different fields of social sciences. Allowing for overlap, these frameworks suggest that women’s empowerment needs to occur along multiple dimensions including: economic, socio-cultural, familial/ interpersonal, legal, political, and psychological. Empowerment is culturally relative term; it is itself not a western concept. Availability of capital affects women's ability or decision making and self- confidence which are closely linked with knowledge, women's status and gender relations at home. SHG approach strengthens women's economic autonomy and gives them means to pursue non-traditional activities. These programs impact also on political empowerment and women's right. Since women’s empowerment is the key to socio economic development of the community; bringing women into the mainstream of national development has been a major concern of government. The Ministry of Rural development has special components for women in its programmes. Funds are earmarked as “Women’s component” to ensure flow of adequate resources for the same. Women empowerment is a social process that seeks to counteract the age old acceptance of discrimination against women and aims to achieve greater equity among women in the society. Since the early 1980s empowerment has become a key objective of development. Empowerment has been considered both an end and as a means of development. There has taken place a steady addition of literature on the subject ever since the concept gained wide acceptance among academics and policy makers. Depending on the context concerned, empowerment is defined
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The Indigenous Resiliency Project: a worked example of community-based participatory research

The Indigenous Resiliency Project: a worked example of community-based participatory research

eight young men and women who had experienced resi- dential insecurity (either personally or through a close family member or friend) were recruited through local contacts and health promotion events. These young people participated in the research training and development workshop and four were invited to work with the local team to develop and conduct the project. By the focus group stage, most of the original peer researchers were no longer involved and a ninth young person was trained to participate in the final stage of data collection. The AMS Redfern, in partnership with Babana Aboriginal Men’s Group, identified eight young men through professional or community contacts. All eight were asked to make a com- mitment to engage with the project for the duration (2 days per week for 4 months). The AMS Redfern and Babana Aboriginal Men’s Group introduced a parallel mentoring program where members of the men’s group were matched with peer researchers to provide ongoing cultural support. This unique and valuable innovation has undoubtedly been crucial in maintaining the level of peer researcher involve- ment, with eight peers involved throughout. In keeping with the spirit of CBPR, the role of these mentors evolved during the project and they became an integral part of the research, attending research meetings and accompanying peer researchers during field work and data collection. There has been a lot of discussion within the project teams about changes in the young people engaged as researchers. Health service staff and mentors have commented on their increasing self-esteem and confidence, and their willing- ness to speak out about issues they feel the project needs to address differently. The young people themselves have spoken of an increased sense of community belonging gained from working within a community organisation. The project has increased the youth voices within the participating health services, creating opportunities for dialogue between young people and health workers. Being involved in the project has also connected the participants
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The Pituri Learning Circle: central Australian Aboriginal women's knowledge and practices around the use of <I>Nicotiana</I> spp. as a chewing tobacco

The Pituri Learning Circle: central Australian Aboriginal women's knowledge and practices around the use of <I>Nicotiana</I> spp. as a chewing tobacco

Health uses of mingkulpa: The participants reported that wet mingkulpa was used on the skin in the treatment of ringworms, and in addition, Margaret said that the wet mingkulpa was used for ‘bullant bite, yellow ant, itchy grub, caterpillar and spider bites’ as well as ‘scabies in hair’ and ‘skin sores’. Janet confirmed these uses, adding ‘snake bite or scorpion … cut out the poison with a stone flake and put on mingkulpa’. Margaret recalled that as a child she had ‘lots of insects bites and my mother she used lots of mingkulpa green leaves, grind, grind, always add the ash, wet leaf’, and ‘put this on my skin to stop the pain’. Janet added ‘mingkulpa for the spear wounds, rubbing it one, then they’d travel long distances’. In contrast, Maimie commented that it ‘was too precious to use for anything else’, implying that mingkulpa was not willingly spared in her community for non-chewing purposes.
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An insight into cross cultural communication strategies in health

An insight into cross cultural communication strategies in health

controlled (NACCHO, 2008). Other ATSIHSs work off information gathered from the community by other methods such as community engagement and deliver health care needs to the all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders who seek their assistance. The reluctance of many of these health services to participate in the research study was disappointing. Added to this, the area encompassed in the research had to be reduced to South East Queensland of which only four health services agreed to participate. Limitations of time, financial resources, and other practical reasons added to the difficulties that confronted the researcher. A positive contributing factor was that the four health services that agreed to participate represented diverse areas from the Western fringes of the Darling Downs to the Coast and as far up as Tin Can Bay. All four services applied strategies to improve communication with their clients, therefore a review of each of these strategies must be undertaken to reveal to what extent success was experienced in the application of these strategies. Some of the themes will be linked together as they are seen to be connected in some way or perceived to be the same as the primary theme under consideration. The following themes that are discussed allow the reader to understand the how‟s and why‟s of the conclusion that the researcher has come to in the last chapter of this dissertation.
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A sexual health quality improvement program (SHIMMER) triples chlamydia and gonorrhoea testing rates among young people attending Aboriginal primary health care services in Australia

A sexual health quality improvement program (SHIMMER) triples chlamydia and gonorrhoea testing rates among young people attending Aboriginal primary health care services in Australia

Simon Graham, Julie Booker, Chris O ’ Brien, Kristine Garrett and James Ward are Aboriginal Australians and acknowledge the contribution Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians make to this work. We would like to thank all the staff at each ACCHS who provide culturally appropriate medical, allied health and education to improve the health and well-being of Aboriginal people. James S Ward and Simon Graham were the principle investigators for the SHIMMER project. We would like to acknowledge the investigators of the STRIVE project. The GRHANITE extraction tool was developed by Dr Douglas Boyle at the University of Melbourne. Dr Mary Ellen Harrod and Mrs Lucy Watchirs Smith contribution to data management, validation, indicator development and ensured each ACCHS received accurate data reports. Simon Graham is supported by a McKenzie post-doctoral fellowship and by the Melbourne Poche Centre for Indigenous Health at the University of Melbourne. Rebecca Guy, John Kaldor and Basil Donovan are supported by National Health and Medical Research Council Fellowships. The SHIMMER project was funded by the New South Wales Ministry of Health. The Kirby Institute is affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Australia.
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