Top PDF MORE JOBS, BETTER JOBS: BASELINE STUDY

MORE JOBS, BETTER JOBS: BASELINE STUDY

MORE JOBS, BETTER JOBS: BASELINE STUDY

The lowest scores for this question were from other large public bodies in the health and higher education sectors, all of which scored 5 or below on this question. That reflects the fact that their focus is not on the economy and jobs or poverty reduction. Despite that, examples of positive policies are in place, such as bursary schemes and ‘buy local’ policies – exemplified by the fact that a senior figure in one LCR university could cite specific local suppliers used in university building work. Universities are also aware of their impact on the local economy through supporting business innovation and skills, acting as large employers and as developers. On poverty and communities, the University of Huddersfield has policies to encourage staff to become local school governors (many in deprived areas), is a Fairtrade university, and generally has a ‘strong social conscience’ which leads it to take fairness into account in decision- making. It is highly active on enterprise and in the local and city region economy. As with business, relatively low scores in the sector do not signal an absence of activity, but rather that what is in place could be extended and better joined up.
Show more

80 Read more

Towards Common Principles of Flexicurity: More and better jobs through fl exibility and security

Towards Common Principles of Flexicurity: More and better jobs through fl exibility and security

The countries which are addressed by this pathway are dominated by larger enterprises, offer- ing high levels of job protection. Workers are strongly attached to their enterprise and labour market dynamism is rather low. In recent years, this tradition has come under strain because company restructurings and outsourcing are becoming more frequent. Social security systems in these countries are largely well-developed and benefi ts are adequate. Combining good ben- efi ts with strong incentives for accepting jobs remains a challenge. Spending on active labour market policies has often increased strongly, but programmes are not always effective, espe- cially when it comes to offering roads back into employment for long-term unemployed. Benefi ts for citizens and society would accrue from enhanced mobility of workers between en- terprises. Workers will be more inclined to take risks associated with job transfers if benefi ts are adequate during transition periods and if prospects for new and better jobs are real.
Show more

42 Read more

More and better jobs for Pakistan: Can the manufacturing sector play a greater role

More and better jobs for Pakistan: Can the manufacturing sector play a greater role

As expected, these results, especially the decline in poverty, have led to considerable controversy. Amjad (2012) has tried to address this issue by arguing that, despite the economic slowdown and high inflation, poverty and the labour market were favourably affected by (i) the almost twelve-fold increase in remittances from just over USD1.5 billion in FY2001 to around USD12 billion in FY2012 (or around 5 percent of GDP in the latter year); (ii) improved terms of trade in favour of agriculture as the PPP doubled the procurement price of wheat, the major agricultural crop, and other support prices; and (iii) a significantly large and vibrant undocumented economy. That this “resilience” of the Pakistan economy resulted in poverty levels not falling or only marginally declining is, however, strongly contested. Nonetheless, a recent study by the World Bank (2013) tends to back the view that poverty levels did not increase, at least based on data for the Punjab (60 percent of the population), which is seen to be more reliable than data for the other three provinces (Newman, 2013).
Show more

54 Read more

Do unemployment benefits help those seeking work to obtain better jobs?

Do unemployment benefits help those seeking work to obtain better jobs?

Substantial differences in the generosity of UI systems are also found in Europe. Countries such as Denmark, Germany, France, and (to some extent) Spain provide more generous benefits—both in levels and duration—than countries such as Greece and Italy. Using survey data from Europe for the period 1994–2001 allows the examination of the effect of being a benefit recipient on unemployment duration and subsequent employment stability [7]. The findings suggest that benefit recipients experience longer unemployment spells than non-recipients, but that the availability of UI has a positive effect on the stability of subsequent employment. The latter effect is more pronounced in countries with more generous systems and for workers who accept a job after being unemployed for at least six months. This suggests that there is some heterogeneity of effects for those who are closer to the end of their benefit period.
Show more

10 Read more

Foreword. Creating more and better jobs is the Government s first priority.

Foreword. Creating more and better jobs is the Government s first priority.

grouping is of a more medium-term nature. It includes markets in the European Economic Area (EEA) which are already well established and developing economies with which Ireland already has an established relationship and where multi-sectoral opportunities have been identified. EEA countries are grouped together to reflect the fact that these countries share a regulatory framework and most State agencies service Europe from a smaller number of geographical hub offices. Specific EEA countries serviced by Local Market Teams are highlighted.

24 Read more

Better Jobs. Extensive Summary

Better Jobs. Extensive Summary

At present, there are hardly any qualified technicians who are unemployed, and it is expected that shortages will continue to exist. This implies that technical employees working in jobs related to fighter planes, will be displaced from other jobs. Part of the jobs will be filled by people from abroad. This is not unusual in industrial production, especially for airplanes. Commercial and administrative jobs will in part be filled by unemployed people. In the long term additional employment will lead to wage increases which reduce employment in other jobs. This tendency towards labour market equilibrium will then cause full displacement.
Show more

12 Read more

ISBN X OECD Employment Outlook: 2003 Towards More and Better Jobs OECD Introduction. Towards More and Better Jobs

ISBN X OECD Employment Outlook: 2003 Towards More and Better Jobs OECD Introduction. Towards More and Better Jobs

Chapter 2 documents the considerable scope for improving the employment position of under-represented groups. When they get into work, many women, older workers and low- educated persons are at risk of getting trapped in low-paid jobs. And they are also subject to considerable employment instability. Indeed, in both Europe and the United States, those who are low-paid in a given year are likely to spend nearly four of the following five years in either low-paid employment or non-employment. This suggests that policies that help people move up career ladders should become an important component in any medium-term employment strategy.
Show more

5 Read more

better skills better jobs better health

better skills better jobs better health

development of a Foundation degree for the healthcare sector. This intermediate level award set at 240 credits, is notionally a two year programme of ‘full time’ study. However, many Foundation degrees in health will be undertaken on a part-time basis and are likely to span three or even four years. The decisions on how the modules within the framework should be compiled and sequenced within the programme are left to the institutions, which have extensive expertise in this area.

33 Read more

Are Over educated People Insiders or Outsiders? A Case of Job Search Methods and Over education in UK  ESRI WP258, September 2008

Are Over educated People Insiders or Outsiders? A Case of Job Search Methods and Over education in UK ESRI WP258, September 2008

An important question which then arises is how to distinguish between sizes of sets of alternatives among workers with the same levels of education. Because of educational expansion there are now many workers with tertiary levels of education – how should we differentiate among them? The field of study an individual has completed can support our theoretical construct. Workers with more narrowly defined majors/fields of study will reveal smaller and better defined sets of job alternatives while workers from more transversal fields of study will have less clearly defined possible jobs and therefore larger sets of alternative jobs. This translates again into inequality in information about the labour market positions available to different individuals. For example, engineers will see their labour markets as being more structured while humanists will often encounter a decision as to which job or sector would be adequate for them.
Show more

25 Read more

Chasing Graduate Jobs

Chasing Graduate Jobs

It is often argued by politicians and in the mediathat the increase in the number of higher education graduates has created an “over-education” problem in Scotland. It is believed that the higher education sector is generating “too many” graduates for the economy to absorb, which causes two undesirable outcomes. The first is that it creates “under-employment”. There is no universally agreed definition of what constitutes “under-employment”. However, with respect to higher education, it generally refers to a situation when graduates are employed in jobs that do not require the skillsthey obtained through their study to perform the required work. An obvious example of an under-employedgraduateis an individual with a medical degree who is a taxi driver.The second is that is that it increases out-migration. It is believed that over-education through under-employment is “forcing” graduates to migrate to other regions of the UK or abroad in order to find employment that better matches the skills they obtained through higher education.
Show more

33 Read more

Chasing Graduate Jobs?

Chasing Graduate Jobs?

It is often argued by politicians and in the media that the increase in the number of higher education graduates has created an “over-education” problem in Scotland. It is believed that the higher education sector is generating “too many” graduates for the economy to absorb, which causes two undesirable outcomes. The first is that it creates “under-employment”. There is no universally agreed definition of what constitutes “under-employment”. However, with respect to higher education, it generally refers to a situation when graduates are employed in jobs that do not require the skills they obtained through their study to perform the required work. An obvious example of an under-employed graduate is an individual with a medical degree who is a taxi driver. The second is that is that it increases out-migration. It is believed that over-education through under-employment is “forcing” graduates to migrate to other regions of the UK or abroad in order to find employment that better matches the skills they obtained through higher education.
Show more

33 Read more

Better Algorithm of Ordinal Online Schedule for Jobs with Similar Sizes on Two Machines

Better Algorithm of Ordinal Online Schedule for Jobs with Similar Sizes on Two Machines

minimize the maximum completion times of the jobs on each machine. The earliest algorithm for on-line scheduling jobs on parallel machines is the List Scheduling (LS) algorithm, which was introduced by Graham [1]. Many models and algorithms for online scheduling are proposed later on. In classic scheduling problem, there is no constraints on the size of job. However, in practice, the size of job can neither be too large nor too small. This motivates researchers to study scheduling problems when the sizes of all jobs are known in [ ] 1, r with r ≥ 1 [2]-[7].
Show more

9 Read more

Bridge jobs in Europe

Bridge jobs in Europe

Since countries differ because of a wide range of observable and unobservable charac- teristics, the identification of the effects of economic institutions on the labour market transitions of older workers is difficult if not impossible using cross section data. To better illustrate this point, consider employment protection legislation, which can have two opposite effects on labour market outcomes. Stricter protection can lead both to greater retention of workers because it raises firing costs and to fewer hirings because it raises hiring costs. The OECD, 2006, plots the employment rate of men aged 50 to 64 against the strictness of employment protection in a number of member countries, and shows that there is a negative and statistically significant correlation. Yet the omis- sion of country – specific effects that can affect both employment protection and em- ployment rates implies that this correlation does not inform us of the presence of a causal relationship. One way to control for the host of time invariant country – specific effects is to use longitudinal data and focus on the variations of institutional rules over time. In the next section of this paper, we focus on two such rules, minimum retire- ment age and employment protection legislation, and exploit their within – country variations to study the effects on the labour market transitions of older workers 12 . Table 3 Reasons to move to a bridge job and number and types of job changes after leaving the full time career job
Show more

18 Read more

Who creates the jobs?

Who creates the jobs?

Starting with row 1 of the matrix – firms born with just one employee – we see that almost half of them (22.2/51.0) still had only one employee at the end of the decade; and almost half of those who grew added just one more employee (11.5/(51.0-22.2). And notice, movement from the one employee size-band into the 20+ size-band was quite a rare event, with just a 2.4% chance (1.2/51.0). For most of the smaller size-bands the pattern is similar to that for size1: a relatively large chance of staying in the size- band of birth, with the chance of a move (in either direction) decaying with distance (though grouping 5 to 9 employee firms into a single size- band does cause some distortion), and relatively little chance of becoming large.
Show more

11 Read more

Chasing Graduate Jobs

Chasing Graduate Jobs

in category (5). It is important to stress that this is a very stringent definition of non- graduate employment, consisting largely of what may be termed “dead-end jobs” such as taxi driver, waitress/waiter, secretary, receptionist, construction labourer and security guard. There is little disagreement that jobs that fall into this category do not require higher education to execute the required tasks. If it is the case, that a large share of the occupations in category (4) are in reality non-graduate jobs, then the estimates of under-employment presented below are likely to be lower bounds with the actual level being higher. In other words, we are making the task that we set out for ourselves more difficult to demonstrate.
Show more

29 Read more

Farm jobs and farmworkers

Farm jobs and farmworkers

The $13.7 billion total wage figure represents pay- ments to all workers, including those who were em- ployed at other times of the month but not during the payroll period that includes the 12th. Dividing $13.7 billion by 425,400 gives $32,316, which would be the average annual salary of a full-time farmworker. However, since many farmworkers are employed fewer than 2,080 hours a year, average earnings for the in- dividuals who do farm work are significantly less; our analysis of earnings by individual workers (see below) indicates that the average earnings from all jobs of all workers with at least one job in California agriculture was $19,762 in 2016.
Show more

6 Read more

OFFSHORING OF SERVICE JOBS

OFFSHORING OF SERVICE JOBS

Abstract : Many previously-nontraded services have become tradable (or are expected to become so) as a result of the technological advances in information technology. That has raised concerns about the future of U.S. jobs and workers' incomes. However, a review of the evidence shows that the current extent of service offshoring is very modest, not only as a share of GDP but also in terms of its contribution to worker displacements in the United States. Service offshoring is currently a minor part of the overall international economic competition that the United States faces. Service offshoring appears to have been relatively intense for IT occupations, but the employment and wage trends in those occupations still compare favorably to U.S. averages. While offshoring might become much more significant in the future, a closer look at occupation details reveals that most U.S. service jobs are not suitable for performing remotely from abroad, even when some significant cultural and institutional barriers are ignored. In addition, a range of transaction and adjustment costs slow offshoring growth, and it would take a long time, possibly decades, for offshoring to attain its potential limits. However, the available estimates regarding how fast and how far offshoring will grow are very uncertain. This paper's assessment is that the exposure to service offshoring in the United States will be limited to 10 to 20 percent of current jobs, with an impact that is sufficiently gradual to blend with other ongoing structural changes in the U.S. economy.
Show more

63 Read more

Jobs in a Free Country

Jobs in a Free Country

Some believe that protectionism saves jobs, but it actually stifles competition from foreign business, allows domestic firms to charge more than what products or se[r]

27 Read more

jobs for New Yorkers

jobs for New Yorkers

“FLCC has taken the lead to partner with local manufacturers to promote and develop talent pipelines for high technology-oriented jobs through its Emerging Technologies program. The College’s support of the Finger Lakes Manufacturing Enterprise (FAME) will result in job placements (internships) and student engagement that would not occur otherwise.” —Ron Golumbeck | ITT Goulds Pumps, Seneca Falls

5 Read more

Employment in Europe 1998. Jobs for people - people for jobs: turning policy guidelines into action. Report from the Commission. COM (98) 666 final, 20 November 1998

Employment in Europe 1998. Jobs for people - people for jobs: turning policy guidelines into action. Report from the Commission. COM (98) 666 final, 20 November 1998

Jobs for people- people for jobs: turning policy guidelines into action Job§ for p~ople - people for jobs: turning policy guideline§ into action The adoption of the Employment Guidelines[r]

19 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...