Top PDF Music: Its Language, History, and Culture

Music: Its Language, History, and Culture

Music: Its Language, History, and Culture

I once thought I possessed creative talent, but have given up this idea. A woman must not desire to compose – not one has been able to do it, and why should I expect to? It would be arrogance, although indeed, my father led me into it in earlier days. Clara never intended to give up her concert career after her marriage, and Robert never seriously suggested it. Despite his desire for a quiet home and a woman to look after him and their children, he was aware of his wife’s needs as an artist and his attitude toward her career was, for a man of his time, unusually enlightened and supportive. Clara’s letters and diary entries indicate she recognized her importance as a pianist and considered herself first an artist and only afterward a parent. The conflicts between public concertizing and raising a family intensified in 1854 when Robert, suffering from mental illness and depression, entered a sanitarium where he died two years later. Clara was pregnant at the time he became terminally ill, and soon after the birth of their eighth child, she set out on the first of many concert tours that were to become a regular feature of her life for more than 30 years. She now bore the entire responsibility of providing for a large family. But she also seems to have felt a need for artistic self-expression, which she sought in performing. She may also have found comfort in bringing her husband’s music to the attention of the public. As she wrote to a friend:
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Polynesian language and culture history

Polynesian language and culture history

and traditions. Synthesis seemed possible only from a clear enunciation of results from the individual disciplines and a comparison of those results. I had been aware that anthropologists and archaeologists can take a rather mechanical view of language, exemplified in the great interest in lexicostatistics about thirty years ago, and that linguists and archaeologists can take a rather mechanical view of culture, each hoping to find some central insight that will lead them to some core theory and method of the other discipline that can be applied across a large number of research problems. Of course no discipline can be reduced to such a concise set of insights and here I present an exposition of why we cannot for language (pre)history in Polynesia. The main subgrouping results, however, are based on shared sporadic sound changes, a linguistic method which can be readily understood by people from other disciplines.
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Optional Program Course: History of Mayan Culture and Civilization Language and Cultural Studies in the Yucatán

Optional Program Course: History of Mayan Culture and Civilization Language and Cultural Studies in the Yucatán

Optional Program Course: History of Mayan Culture and Civilization Language and Cultural Studies in the Yucatán History of Mayan Culture and Civilization is designed especially for participants on the Language and Cultural Studies in the Yucatán program. It is taught in Spanish by Mexican professors. This course is worth 3 U.S. semester credit hours.

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Finland Suomi 100 : language, culture, history

Finland Suomi 100 : language, culture, history

2.... F Fiiiin F F n nn n n niiiissssh n h h h aaaan nd n n d d U d U U Urrrraaaalllliiiicccc ssssttttu u u ud d d diiiieeeessss:::: ‘‘‘‘tttty yp y y po p p oo ollllo oo og gg gy y y y aaaan nd n n d d u d u u un n n niiiiv vv veeeerrrrssssaaaallllssss’’’’ Let us then mention some phenomena that, albeit considered to be typical Finnish/Balto­Finnic and /or Uralic features, illustrate the ways in which various universal linguistic principles and notions may be encoded across the languages of the world. First, the phenomenon of the ‘differential object marking’ (so­called DOM), in Finnish and beyond, for which see Marc­ antonio (1983 & 1988), and a summary in Witzlack­Makarevich & Seržant (2017). In Finnish, the distribution of the markers of the direct object is, mostly, ‘verb­oriented’, that is: it is based on verbal categories such as tense, aspect (perfectivity vs non­perfectivity, etc.) and mood (so­called TAM), as well as the level of transitivity, or polarity (see Tamm 2014, Heinämäki 1994). This complex verbal system in turn interacts with the case system, involving also the occurrence, or otherwise, of the ‘multi­task’ partitive case, whose distribution is governed by a series of grammatical, pragmatical, referential and cognitive factors, all interacting in a complex way – see also the concept of ‘bounded’ vs ‘unbounded’ verbs, as proposed by Kiparsky (1998 & 2001). On the other hand, in languages /dialects such as Permic, Eastern Mari and Erzya­Mordvin, the marking of the object is, mostly, ‘object­oriented’, being based on categories such as animacy and referential properties of the object, information structuring of the sentence (definite­ ness and topicality scale), etc. – although, within this basic typological scheme, there is a wealth of variation, even within the dialects of one and the same language (Serdobolskaya 2016/18). Of general interest is also the Hungarian system, where there is an interplay between the topic /focus structure, the use of the so­called definite/objective vs indefinite /subjective conjugation, and word order. The distribution of the double conjugation is nowadays controlled by mechanical, grammatical rules (although still con­ nected to properties such as definiteness and referentiality of the object), but it did play a proper information structuring role in Old Hungarian, for which see Marcantonio (1981) & (1985); compare also Marcantonio (1994) for the behaviour and distribution of double conjugation vs double object marking in some dialects of Vogul (/Mansi).
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AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY, CULTURE AND LANGUAGE. Curriculum Framework

AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY, CULTURE AND LANGUAGE. Curriculum Framework

There are additional examples in the treaty deliberations with the other trib- al nations. Need for Historical Accuracy Tribal sovereignty has not been understood, therefore a prevalent concern among American Indian scholars is to present an accurate history. The Insti- tute for the Development of Indian Law defines sovereignty as the supreme power from which all specific political powers are derived.

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AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY, CULTURE AND LANGUAGE. Curriculum Framework

AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY, CULTURE AND LANGUAGE. Curriculum Framework

There are cultural values that govern appropriate leadership behaviors and styles. These behaviors have changed over time due to European-American contact. Throughout the history of contact, Euro-Americans have consistent- ly misunderstood American Indian traditions of leadership. Europeans and Euro-Americans thought of leaders within the context of their own hierar- chical traditions. Leaders in European traditions had the right to rule over others on the basis of divine right or class privilege. Even in the budding democracy of the United States, it was believed and Americans continue to believe that, given equality of opportunity, leaders emerge because of their superior qualities. Respect for the authority of leaders to make decisions on their people’s behalf is accepted.
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AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY, CULTURE AND LANGUAGE. Curriculum Framework

AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY, CULTURE AND LANGUAGE. Curriculum Framework

The Haudenosaunee have preserved a story of the origins of the Tree of Peace. At the planting of a Tree of Peace at Philadelphia in 1986, Mohawk Chief Jake Swamp explained through interpreter Chief Tom Porter: In the beginning of time, when our Creator made the human beings, everything needed to survive in the future was created. Our Creator asked only one thing: Never forget to be appreciative of the gifts of Mother Earth. Our people were instructed how to be grateful and how to survive. But at one time, during a dark age in our history perhaps over 1000 years ago, human beings no longer listened to the original instructions. Our Creator be- came sad, because there was so much crime, dishonesty, injustice and so many wars. So our Creator sent a Great Peacemaker with a message to be righteous and just and to make a good future for our children seven generations to come. He called all the warring people together, and told them as long as there was killing, there would never be peace of mind. There must be a concerted effort by human beings, an orchestrated effort, for peace to prevail. Through logic, reasoning and spiritual means, he inspired the warriors to bury their weapons (the origin of the saying to “bury the hatchet”) and planted on top a sacred Tree of Peace.”
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Welcome to Italy! language art culture music teacher training

Welcome to Italy! language art culture music teacher training

Nestled close to the hills of Chianti, it is the benefi- ciary of the favorable fruits, wines and oils that are native to this region. It has a pulse all of its own, that flows from the vibrant outdoor San Lorenzo Market, the thriving nightlife of Piazza Santa Croce and the alternative scene of Piazza Santo Spirito.

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FREE HEAVY METAL: THE MUSIC AND ITS CULTURE PDF

FREE HEAVY METAL: THE MUSIC AND ITS CULTURE PDF

To conclude, what of the PMRC and its mediatic circus, then? She doesn't spare her view: 'lyrics were interpreted in a maximally incompetent way, logical fallacies were committed, and the distortions were tirelessly repeated and taken up by the media without reflections. Now, the PMRC may have Heavy Metal: The Music and Its Culture failed in its endeavours, but aren't the baloneys it entertained about metal music still prevalent? Well, like or not, metal remains 'the beast that refuses to die', and if you are curious as to know why, let alone understand what heavy metal really is all about, then this book is the perfect read. Nov 07, Michelle rated it it was ok. Interesting read, but too dated for my taste. Sure, it's great if you want to know about metal's earliest history, but so many things Heavy Metal: The Music and Its Culture developed since this book was published in Because of this the read became a bit of a dread after the first half.
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Meme language, its impact on digital culture and collective thinking

Meme language, its impact on digital culture and collective thinking

Analysis of the online meme survey allows us to take a new look at modern digital culture, the thinking of individuals who use meme language. 3 Results Language is the basic ability of the human brain for complex communication systems, which is necessary for the transfer of information between most autonomous subjects. The word "language" thus refers to a specific example of such communication. The language of memes in the Internet is a language that is mostly humorous, can be indirectly compared to non-verbal communication language. The use of humor has been discovered "in all social conditions throughout history and has led to attempts of the researchers to explain its philosophical foundations, different types" and what elements make it successful and why people are "motivated to consume" [18]. Perhaps memes represent an example of how people use humor in a given period of time, and perhaps over time they will be replaced, or become a permanent part of the Internet language, in scientific circles, the study of memes, the language of memes is at an early stage, as and the Internet language itself. Changes and additions taking place in the means of communication provide a prospect for further research, as well as aspects related to the Internet culture, which has greatly benefited from the invention and use of the Internet.
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The South African Society of Music Teachers : its history, contribution and transformation

The South African Society of Music Teachers : its history, contribution and transformation

It would appear that the CAPS revision has not substantially changed the fact that music is still taught according to a Western orientated curriculum and methodology. Since 1997, after the South African democratic elections, schools were no longer segregated and educationalists worked towards establishing a single unitary education system in South Africa that would cater for all cultures. This change in official policy made it possible for multicultural music offerings at schools. The assumption was that trained music specialists would offer multicultural music. The problem of language and culture became a stumbling block and western literacy methodologies were used for all musics. Traditional, indigenous songs were transcribed, printed and distributed and sung from notation. Informal community songs, dealing with everyday life and social issues relevant to a certain context, sung with spontaneous participation, assumed a formal character; presented as concert pieces, they were prescribed for competitions and choirs were conducted like academically trained musicians (Fredericks 2008: 132).
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Culture and International History IV. Culture and International History IV

Culture and International History IV. Culture and International History IV

IV. Music and International Relations If the relation between culture and the state proves to be an evergreen for scholars of cul- ture and international history, music is mo- ving in fast as a new radical topic. In his se- cond paper, Pells had a keen eye for the many ironies and paradoxes on the globalization of Jazz. Its roots were never solely African, but shaped by styles and forms of music played by American whites, and instruments com- ing from Europe not Africa. Used in Ameri- can cultural diplomacy in the Cold War era as proof that America’s blacks were duly respec- ted in their own country, black jazz musici- ans were sent on international tours, turning jazz music into an international musical ver-
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Music, Pandemics, and History

Music, Pandemics, and History

Gregory Barz, The Culture of AIDS in Africa: Hope and Healing in Music and the Arts (Ed.) Fraser G. McNeill, AIDS, Politics, and Music in South Africa.[r]

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The History of World Music

The History of World Music

Moment one: “bourgeois revolution,” or the emergence of a commercial public sector? In Richard Middleton’s outline of Western popular-music history, such songbooks and broadsheets constituted one aspect of the extension of commercial capitalist modes of production throughout many aspects of musical life. Such penetration was itself a ramification of a much broader socioeconomic, cultural, and technological revolution linked to the triumph of bourgeois capitalism and modernity in general. Of Middleton’s three moments, this is the least broadly applicable outside the mainstream West, in that nowhere else did such an extensive capitalist socioeconomic revolution occur during the nineteenth century, with the partial exception of Edo period and early Meiji Japan. Although Japan’s industrial revolution commenced only belatedly in the 1870s, since well before that period Edo/Tokyo did indeed host a lively urban commercial music scene, formed around theater songs, courtesans, and patronage by an idiosyncratic sort of local bourgeoisie consist- ing of the rising merchant class. Elsewhere in the developing world, however, one can find only pockets of local bourgeois culture, typically consisting of comprador merchants, petty bourgeois clerks and entrepreneurs, and modern- izing members of traditional elites constituting urban progressive sectors embedded in and coexisting with otherwise premodern and precapitalist socio- economic milieus. In many cases, the musical activities of these islands of bourgeois culture might be oriented toward mimicking the culture of their Western colonial masters.
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Bika Ambon of Indonesia: history, culture, and its contribution to tourism sector

Bika Ambon of Indonesia: history, culture, and its contribution to tourism sector

Indonesia is an archipelago with more than 17,000 islands and more than 300 ethnic groups. Today, the country has 35 provinces, and each province has its own local culture, language, and ethnic food. One of the most populated provinces in Indonesia is North Sumatra province with Medan as the capital. As a regional gov- ernment center of North Sumatra, Medan grew into a metropolitan city with a population of more than two million people (Fig. 4). Now the city of Medan is the third largest city in Indonesia after Jakarta and Surabaya. As one of the largest cities in Indonesia, Medan has a high cultural tourism potential to be developed; the city is rich in historical heritage of the past that still exists in the form of historic buildings with customs that are still preserved [12].
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FREE JAPAN: ITS HISTORY AND CULTURE 4TH EDITION PDF. Morton

FREE JAPAN: ITS HISTORY AND CULTURE 4TH EDITION PDF. Morton

In the Nara period, Buddhist statues were made by the national government to boost its prestige. Japan: Its History and Culture 4th edition has traditionally been used as the chief material in Japan, along with traditional Japanese architecture. Statues are often lacqueredgildedor brightly painted, although there are commonly few traces of this on the surface. Bronze and other metals are generally not used. Other materials, such as stone and potteryhave had extremely important roles in traditional sculpture. The music of Japan includes a wide array of performers in distinct styles both traditional and modern. Local music often appears at karaoke venues on lease from record labels. Traditional Japanese music is quite different from Western Music and is based on the intervals of human breathing rather than mathematical timing; [ citation needed ] traditional music also typically slides between notes, a feature also not commonly found in Western music.
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CHRISTIAN MUSIC AND CULTURE IN INDIA

CHRISTIAN MUSIC AND CULTURE IN INDIA

A Monthly Double-Blind Peer Reviewed Refereed Open Access International e-Journal - Included in the International Serial Directories International Journal in Management and Social Science http://www.ijmr.net.in email id- irjmss@gmail.com Page 114 staunch Hindu, he was a generous patron of both native and Western culture as his ancestral rulers were. The conventional historiography of Carnatic music is usually constructed along with the Hindu religious tradition in the nationalist line promoted by dominant Hindu leaders against British rule. According to this kind of historiography, the period in which Carnatic music flourished under Thanjavur Maratha rule is regarded as the golden era. Tyagaraja (1767-1847), Muttuswami Dikshitar (1775-1835), and Syama Sastri (1762-1827), the so- called Trinity of Carnatic Music, belong to this period. They were all Brahmans who composed either in Telugu, the official language of the Nayakas (local rulers after the Vijayanagara Empire before the Marathas) or in Sanskrit, a literary language used by the Brahmans. They hardly composed in Tamil, a local language of this region, since then. The lack of a Tamil repertoire in Carnatic music prompted the Tamil Isai (music) movement, propagating Tamil songs at the beginning of the 1940s. For reconstructing an alternative historiography of Carnatic music, four distinguished native Christians: Vedanayagam (Pillai) Sastiriyar (1774-1864), Mayuram Vedanayagam Pillai (1826-89), A. M. Chinnaswami Mudaliyar (1813-1901), and Abraham Pandithar (1859-1919). It is important to point out that their activities were the result of interactions with Christian missionaries, British residents, and officials, while the musical Trinity of Carnatic Music was closely related with native rulers. The differences in their approach to music are as follows
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Afro-Brazilian Music and Culture

Afro-Brazilian Music and Culture

CUNY City College How does access to this work benefit you? Let us know! Follow this and additional works at: https://academicworks.cuny.edu/cc_oers Part of the Africana Studies Commons , African Languages and Societies Commons , Language Interpretation and Translation Commons , Latin American Languages and Societies Commons , Modern Languages Commons , Music Commons , Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies Commons , Reading and Language Commons , and the Spanish and Portuguese Language and Literature Commons

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The Music Between Us: Is Music a Universal Language?

The Music Between Us: Is Music a Universal Language?

Nussbaum ’ s theory is not uncontroversial and I would have liked to see Higgins engage more critically with it. One concern is that while many cultures speak of pitches in spatial terms, some do not, and apparently some cultures even reverse the high-low pitch associations that we find in Anglophone culture (p.199 ft.85). Similarly, Higgins observes that all cultures seem to make synaesthetic associations with music (perhaps encouraged by the restriction of music to the auditory channel p.113) but these associations can differ quite a lot. As such, it may be that we have a universal tendency to make some kind of connection between music and spatial layout or movement, but this is done in heterogeneous ways. If more complex properties of the music rely on us making such associations, I worry that these different associations may be a source of further divisions between musical cultures.
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FREE CHEESE AND CULTURE: A HISTORY OF CHEESE AND ITS PLACE IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION PDF

FREE CHEESE AND CULTURE: A HISTORY OF CHEESE AND ITS PLACE IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION PDF

Two sets of lists of such signs were found from Cluny, a prominent Benedictine house. It is interesting that the lists start with signs for food. Bread is at number 1 on the list, followed by signs for beans, eggs, and various types of fish. Both of the lists from Cluny date from the late 11th century, so it is likely that a similar sign language would have been used by the monks at St Albans, when Abbot Geoffrey assigned the cheese for his kitchen in the first half of the 12th century. Added to this, there was in the late 13th and 14th century a series of outbreaks of disease devastating English sheep flocks.
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