Top PDF NEW SPEC UNIT 2 (TOPIC 3)

NEW SPEC UNIT 2 (TOPIC 3)

NEW SPEC UNIT 2 (TOPIC 3)

In the embryos of all female mammals, one of the X chromosomes in each cell is inactivated by super- coiling. This ensures that females (as well as males) have only one functioning X chromosome. The highly coiled chromosome lies just inside the nuclear envelope. It is known as a Barr body, so called because Barr and Bertram first observed it (in 1949). In humans, the inactivation occurs on about the 12th day of development. The inactivation occurs randomly: in some female cells the maternal X chromosome is inactivated and in others the paternal X chromosome is inactivated. When these cells divide, all the new cells created have the same inactive X chromosome as the original parent cell. Some cats are an unusual colour, tortoiseshell, with a mix of black and orange splodges. This is the result of the X chromosome inactivation in cats. The gene that determines whether a cat’s coat colour is ginger, black or tortoiseshell is carried on the sex chromosome. It is therefore said to be sex-linked. Female (XX) cats can have any of three phenotypes as a result of this sex-linkage. If the cat is
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NEW SPEC UNIT 2 (TOPIC 4)

NEW SPEC UNIT 2 (TOPIC 4)

Of the 13 captive-bred V. v. variegata released to date, five (two males, three females) have been killed by C. ferox. Of these five, one pair produced triplets in October 1999, and at least one of these offspring is also presumed to have fallen victim to C. ferox predation. It is particularly disappointing that this pair who had been able to reproduce and raise triplets were killed. Of the remaining animals one male died as a result of injuries sustained during a fall or possibly malnutrition and another female simply disappeared. One male from the November 1997 release is integrated into a wild group and thriving. A female released in November 1998 has been withdrawn from the programme following the killing of her two fellow releasees by C. ferox, but also due to her poor adaptation over a period of 2 years in the forest. Three males and one female released in January 2001 are still surviving and showing good signs of adaptation in terms of food location, travel and navigation within the forest. Preliminary analyses of behavioural data indicate that individuals with early or long-term experience in enclosures that simulate the natural forest environment of this species adapt better to life in the wild. This has been the case for both the first and third release groups. For both groups it has been possible to stop supplemental feeding within a few months of release. Also both groups have shown similar ranging patterns to wild V. v. variegata and have established territories of comparable size. However, the second release group had very limited experience (a few months) in ‘natural habitat enclosures’ and remained reliant on provisioning throughout their 2 years in the forest. This group showed no inclination to range far from their release site in search of food.
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NEW SPEC UNIT 5 (TOPIC 7)

NEW SPEC UNIT 5 (TOPIC 7)

Dissociation curves are useful when thinking about whether the haemoglobin is combining with or releasing oxygen. Notice on the dissociation curve in Figure 2 that haemoglobin becomes almost fully saturated with oxygen at partial pressures of 10 kPa and above. Blood is rarely more saturated than 95%. In the blood leaving the lungs the partial pressure of oxygen is about 13 kPa; this favours loading of the haemoglobin with oxygen, so the blood will be saturated with oxygen. As tissues around the body respire, oxygen diffuses out of the blood plasma, causing the partial pressure of oxygen in the blood to fall. Small decreases in the partial pressure of oxygen in the plasma can result in comparatively large falls in the saturation of the haemoglobin as it gives up more of its oxygen. In resting tissues the partial pressure of oxygen is around 5.5 kPa and oxygen dissociates from the haemoglobin until it is only about 75% saturated. This replenishes the oxygen in the plasma, making more available for respiring cells.
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NEW SPEC UNIT 1 (TOPIC 1)

NEW SPEC UNIT 1 (TOPIC 1)

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends the assessment of health risks due to being overweight or obese should be based on both Body Mass Index (BMI) and waist circumference. It recommends the use of the two measures because although BMI takes account of height, it does not differentiate between mass due to muscle development and mass due to body fat. In addition, BMI does not consider fat distribution, which has been identified as contributing to increased health risk. The health risk consequences of obesity can be significant; an obese man is five times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes and a woman is 13 times more likely. Obese men and women are about three times more likely to develop cancer of the colon, and both have increased risk of a number of other diseases including cardiovascular disease (CVD).
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NEW SPEC UNIT 5 (TOPIC 8)

NEW SPEC UNIT 5 (TOPIC 8)

antithrombin protein. A GM goat can produce about 2.5 litres of milk a day containing 5 g of the antithrombin, which means that in a year each goat can produce about a kilogram of the protein, overcoming the reliance on donated human blood. Also see the ‘Did you know?’ box Transgenic sheep and AAT on page 262 of Student Book 2. In addition, significant quantities of the human proteins interferon beta, used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, and monoclonal antibody miR24, used to treat melanoma skin cancer, have been produced in the egg white of GM chickens. GM microorganisms can also be used in the manufacture of therapeutic proteins and vaccines. GM microorganisms are also used to make animal proteins for the food industry, for example, chymosin enzyme used in making hard cheese, which would otherwise be extracted from calves’ stomachs.
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NEW SPEC UNIT 1 (TOPIC 2)

NEW SPEC UNIT 1 (TOPIC 2)

Salters-Nuffield Advanced Biology Resources Activity 2.20 Student Sheet. You are Alex G Gnome, a genetic counsellor[r]

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NEW SPEC UNIT 4 (TOPIC 6)

NEW SPEC UNIT 4 (TOPIC 6)

The details of the final conclusion are not that important, but it should be possible to deduce that the victim, Patrick Barrett-Hughes, met with Gifford at Garlands Rd, where he could have handed over the briefcase and accepted money. The witness statements suggest a row broke out. If the stabbing took place at this point, it could have been possible for the victim to get home as it can be seen from the map that Whitepost Hill is only around the corner from Garlands Rd. A likely conclusion is that the case should be passed on for a murder trial. See the hints column on page 2 for detailed outcomes for each expert group.
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The Spec UI framework

The Spec UI framework

A key design goal of Spec is to enable the seamless reuse of user interfaces as widgets for the user interface you are building. The reason for this is that it results in a significant productivity boost when creating user interfaces. This focus on reuse was actually already visible in the previous chapter, where we have seen that basic widgets can be used as if they were a com- plete user interface. In this section we focus on the reuse and composition of widgets, showing that it basically comes for free. The only requirement when building a UI is to consider how the user interface should be parameterized when it is being reused, and there is only one concrete rule that needs to be followed in that respect.
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THE CONVERGENCES AND ANALYTIC OF THE FUNCTION ?(t,x)

THE CONVERGENCES AND ANALYTIC OF THE FUNCTION ?(t,x)

Laplace operator. T. Kato (1973)[4] who showed on the basis of this elegant inequality that, if ( ) and , then the Schrödinger operator is essentially self-adjoint on the set of infinitely differentiable finite functions. W. Faris and R. Lavine (1974)[5] have shown that, in the Kato theorem, the condition ( ) may be replaced by more weak condition ( ) A. Laptev. S. Naboko and O. Safronov (2005) [1] :they proved that the absolutely continuous spectrum of a class of Schrodinger operators in , 3 with slowly decaying and oscillating potential essentially supported by . This means that the spectral projection corresponding to any subset of positive Lebesgue measure is not zero, and Georgi raikov (2010)[2]: prove that the Schrödinger operator = +ɳ , self-adjoint in , 1. Here is a non constant almost periodic function, while decays slowly and regularly at infinity. He study the asymptotic behavior of the discrete spectrum of near the origin, and due to the irregular decay of ɳ , he encounter some non semi classical phenomena. In particular, has less eigenvalues than suggested by the semi classical intuition. The discrete spectrum of the Schrödinger operator := ; self-adjoint in , 1, with decaying potential . The operator is compact in . A
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Linguistic Indicators of Severity and Progress in Online Text based Therapy for Depression

Linguistic Indicators of Severity and Progress in Online Text-based Therapy for Depression

The transcripts from the 882 treatment consulta- tions were analysed using an unsupervised proba- bilistic topic model, using MALLET (McCallum, 2002) to apply standard Latent Dirichlet Alloca- tion (Blei et al., 2003), with the notion of docu- ment corresponding to a single consultation ses- sion, represented as the sequence of words typed by any speaker. Stop words (common words which do not contribute to the content, e.g. ‘the’, ‘to’) were removed as usual (Salton and McGill, 1986), but the word list had to be augmented for text chat conventions and spellings (e.g. unpunc- tuated “ive”). Additionally, common mispellings were mapped to their correctly spelled equivalents using Microsoft Excel’s in-built spellchecker. This was due to the nature of text chat, in contrast to transcribed speech or formal text – the word ‘ques- tionnaire’, for example, was found to have been typed in 21 different ways. Following (Howes et al., 2013) we set the number of topics to 20, 1 used
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An invasive crustacean in Tasmania, Australia : a study on the introduced porcelain crab Petrolisthes elongatus

An invasive crustacean in Tasmania, Australia : a study on the introduced porcelain crab Petrolisthes elongatus

Once introduced in a new region, NIMS can also utilise the natural environment to aid in the dispersal and establishment of new populations through ocean currents and winds (Johnson and Padilla 1996; Carlton 2001; Ricciardi 2007; Hulme 2009; Wilson et al. 2009). In the case of crustaceans; propagules can spend weeks in the water column, dispersing along coastlines until they are mature enough to metamorphose and settle onto benthic habitats (Kinlan and Gaines 2003; Shanks et al. 2003; Johnston et al. 2009). Mature non-indigenous individuals can also move to new environments via migration along the intertidal. Furthermore, the search for food and shelter can lead to the discovery and inoculation of new niche environments, successful establishment and further spread (Herbold and Moyle 1986; Ruiz et al. 1997; Wilson et al. 2009). Mitigation and eradication of introduced marine and intertidal species is a difficult process due to the theory of enemy release in that an introduced species has a physiological and/or reproductive advantage in new environments as it lacks predation and parasites from its native range. This is thought to enable NIMS to thrive in new locations by achieving high densities and growth rates exceeding that of their native range (Torchin et al. 2003; Wotton et al. 2004; Gribben et al. 2013).
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Topic Sentences and Paragraph NOV 2

Topic Sentences and Paragraph NOV 2

• A paragraph for the third point (Camping) • Does it support your topic sentence. • Specific evidence[r]

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Experimental Design to Improve Topic Analysis Based Summarization

Experimental Design to Improve Topic Analysis Based Summarization

We examine product variables to provide direct support in our study, and so we ask how ROUGE R-2 and SU4, and fluency evaluations vary with the experimental factors. This pilot studies un- guided summarization of initial stories from the 3 sample news themes from 3 separate categories. While results are not directly comparable with those of the full TAC 2010 test corpus, we will use the TAC 2010 results as a reference point versus our own results. The average of all experiments are reported along with the TAC 2010 results (Ta- ble 9). Our ROUGE R-2 and SU4 performance seems reasonable showing results better than the baseline but not as good as the best system.
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A new bound for the 2/3 conjecture

A new bound for the 2/3 conjecture

the disjoint union of a large clique of order 2m with all edges colored 1 and a rainbow triangle. For i ∈ {1, 2}, join exactly m vertices of the clique to all three vertices of the rainbow triangle by edges colored i. The obtained simple complete graph has exactly one rainbow triangle, which dominates about half of the vertices. Thus, the average proportion of vertices dominated by triples isomorphic to σ C in the graphs (G k ) k ∈ N is close to 1/2.

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unit 2

unit 2

waste, vegetables, fruits, flowers, leaves from the garden, and paper. Nonbiodegradable waste can be further segregated into: a) Recyclable waste – plastics, paper, glass, metal, etc..[r]

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Text
ABSTRACT pdf

Text ABSTRACT pdf

discussed; sufficient details; and originality with concrete details to illustrate, define, compare, or contrast factual information supporting the thesis. Through development of process appears if the thesis expanded enough to convey a sense of completeness; specific method of development, (such as comparison/contrast, illustration, definition, example, description, fact or personal experience); and an awareness of different points of view. Relevant to assigned topic are indicated by all information clearly pertinent to the topic; extraneous material excluded. Secondly, the writer would provide the description and criteria of organization which suggested by Jacob here.
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Analysis of an Attractor Neural Network’s Response to Conflicting External Inputs

Analysis of an Attractor Neural Network’s Response to Conflicting External Inputs

Abstract The theory of attractor neural networks has been influential in our under- standing of the neural processes underlying spatial, declarative, and episodic memory. Many theoretical studies focus on the inherent properties of an attractor, such as its structure and capacity. Relatively little is known about how an attractor neural net- work responds to external inputs, which often carry conflicting information about a stimulus. In this paper we analyze the behavior of an attractor neural network driven by two conflicting external inputs. Our focus is on analyzing the emergent properties of the megamap model, a quasi-continuous attractor network in which place cells are flexibly recombined to represent a large spatial environment. In this model, the sys- tem shows a sharp transition from the winner-take-all mode, which is characteristic of standard continuous attractor neural networks, to a combinatorial mode in which the equilibrium activity pattern combines embedded attractor states in response to con- flicting external inputs. We derive a numerical test for determining the operational mode of the system a priori. We then derive a linear transformation from the full megamap model with thousands of neurons to a reduced 2-unit model that has sim- ilar qualitative behavior. Our analysis of the reduced model and explicit expressions relating the parameters of the reduced model to the megamap elucidate the condi- tions under which the combinatorial mode emerges and the dynamics in each mode given the relative strength of the attractor network and the relative strength of the two conflicting inputs. Although we focus on a particular attractor network model, we describe a set of conditions under which our analysis can be applied to more general attractor neural networks.
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Building a Chinese discourse topic corpus with a micro-topic scheme based on theme-rheme theory

Building a Chinese discourse topic corpus with a micro-topic scheme based on theme-rheme theory

For the automatic identification of entities of MTS, according to our Definition 2, the predicate is used as a division sign, and thus, the identification of entities of MTS is equiv- alent to the predicate identification problem in a way. In other words, this problem is transformed into a classical semantic role labeling problem. It is worth noting that the recognition of the predicate is limited to one EDTU range, which would contribute to a better recognition result. In addition to classical predicate features in previous studies [27–29], more features are derived from nominal and verbal SRL(Sematic Role Label- ing), such as the location in terms of the NP, the path features, intervening verb and the arguments. Using the Mallet toolkit [26] with features listed in Tables 4 and 5 shows the performance of identifying the entities of MTS on CDTC corpus with 10-fold cross validation.
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NEW SPEC UNIT 4 (TOPIC 5)

NEW SPEC UNIT 4 (TOPIC 5)

Users may need to adapt the risk assessment information to local circumstances.. Activity 5.7 Student Sheet.[r]

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Unit 2 3-1Communities.pptx

Unit 2 3-1Communities.pptx

Common Limiting Factors Sunlight Climate Atmospheric gases Temperature Water Nutrients/Food Fire Soil chemistry Space Other organisms... Ranges of tolerance.[r]

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