Top PDF Online mental health support for young people. November 2017

Online mental health support for young people. November 2017

Online mental health support for young people. November 2017

Further research could also explore some of the interesting findings from our analysis of XenZone’s data. For example, research could explore the topic of gender and online counselling use to see if girls are more likely to refer themselves to online counselling, if boys are more likely to use the service at a younger age, and if young people are more willing to be open about gender fluidity due to the anonymous nature of online provision. Similarly, research could be conducted to ascertain whether young people from certain backgrounds, such as those of a minority ethnic background, are more willing to access support online. Finally, studies could also explore whether young people are more likely to present with certain issues online than in face-to-face counselling, such as self-harm or disclosing abuse and whether it is suitable for all mental health problems, including externalising conditions such as conduct disorder.
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Online counselling: With particular focus on young people and support

Online counselling: With particular focus on young people and support

Certainly, a benefit of online counselling using text is the ability for the client to review the session at a later date. This can be extremely empowering (Oravec, 2000). As computer systems and packages become more compatible, there will be the added advantage of speaking using a microphone and both counsellor and client being able to see one another via webcam, giving the client the option to vary the manner in which they use online technology. Such technology may be useful for people with disabilities who lack the dexterity, or for those who reside in a remote location and choose not to use text. The speed of correspondence can be much faster with online counselling (Gaggioli, 2001) and the client may have more flexibility in the planning of their sessions. An example of this is where the client has identified some strategies they want to initiate as a part of their change process. As a part of the client and counsellor plan, the counsellor can invite the client to send an email if they are experiencing a difficulty with the implementation of their strategies. The counsellor could say agree to respond to the client within twenty four or forty eight hours depending upon the counsellors other work commitments. A person to person counselling relationship can also have a place for the use of online technology in between sessions. There could be advantages within mental health organisations where client relapse is extremely high. Online counselling in isolation from other modalities is not recommended for crisis work (C. Hunt, Shochet, I., & King, R., 2005). However, online counselling can be the initial contact between counsellor and client and act as a point of referral.
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Young men’s attitudes and behaviour in relation to mental health and technology: implications for the development of online mental health services

Young men’s attitudes and behaviour in relation to mental health and technology: implications for the development of online mental health services

Internet for promoting help seeking in young men. Firstly, consistent previous research [36], the survey data indicated that if young men were to refer help to someone with a mental health problem, they would most likely recommend an informal source of help (ie. a friend) rather than a phy- sician or mental health professional. Likewise, participants in the focus groups displayed strong resistance and lack of skills to seek mental health information, support and help for themselves when needed [5]. They associate mental health with illness and pathology and as something that happens to ‘other people’. The focus group data suggested that they would be unlikely to seek professional help for themselves, citing a preference instead for self-help and action-oriented strategies; though they may be more likely to seek professional help if a friend intervened and actively encouraged them to do so. Although the findings were remarkably consistent across all 17 focus groups, there was evidence to suggest that those with a higher level of education or those currently studying PDHPE may have more informed understandings of mental health. Thus, these findings correspond with recommendations made by Rickwood et al. [29], and point to the need for interven- tions to reach young men beyond formal educational set- tings, focus on behaviour change through self-help and action-oriented strategies, and leverage the significant role that peers play in the pathway to professional services.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The perception of a problem is one of the key requirements to accessing support, so the extent to which poor mental health is recognised as such is an important factor to consider when thinking about access to services (Wolpert and Ford, 2015). Children, particularly those of primary school age, rarely access services on their own behalf, which means the perception of important adults is crucial to their access to services in relation to their mental health. The extent to which parents or young people recognise mental health difficulties can be inferred from response to the first question on the impact supplement of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. This asks the parent or young person whether they consider that the child or they have a problem with emotions, concentration, behaviour or getting along with people. A report of definite or severe difficulties was considered to indicate the recognition of poor mental health and a report of no or minor problems to suggest that the parent or young
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

developing a sense of their own identity, their social networks, and their place in wider society (Sawyer et al., 2018). 11 to 19 year olds in England are a diverse group in terms of their evolving identities, behaviours, responsibilities and experiences. The wider social context of adolescence is changing. Since the previous survey, carried out in 2004, social media and smart technology have expanded. By 2017, 12 to 15 year olds were averaging 21 hours a week online (Ofcom, 2017). The 2017 survey focusses on one aspect of being online; how much time is spent on social media (websites and applications that facilitate the creation and sharing of content or participation in social networks). While both the 2004 and 2017 surveys asked about bullying, the latest survey also covered its newer form in cyberbullying; defined as ‘the use of electronic communication to bully a person, typically by sending messages of an intimidating or threatening nature’ (Stevenson, 2010).
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Peer communication in online mental health forums for young
people:directional and nondirectional support

Peer communication in online mental health forums for young people:directional and nondirectional support

The study examined what the forum users discussed and how they sought support and found that forum users were provided with both informational and emotional support. This is consistent with previous research findings [15,26-28]. However, the findings from this large dataset reveal that this informational or emotional support can also be considered as coming from one of two approaches; directive or nondirective. The nondirective approach refers to young people providing others with either informational or emotional support by sharing their own experiences. The majority of responses were from young people in a similar situation, sharing practical advice or information on what works or worked for them, or what they have been recommended by health professionals. In light of previous research findings [25], through sharing similar experiences, the young forum users gained an understanding that they may not have received from their offline friends and family. The sharing of experiences also appears to provide empathy, the feeling of being less isolated, and that individuals are not alone in their situation; helping to provide some sense of normality and thus providing emotional support. The directive approach, in contrast, is associated with offering more practical advice. In using this approach, responders were able to help others with whom they may not share experiences but they still want to, and feel able to, offer support; adding a new dimension to peer support online.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

There is a widespread perception that rates of ASD are increasing (The Lancet, 2018). The Trends and Characteristics topic report does not find evidence to support this, with an overall prevalence in 5 to 15 year olds of about one in a hundred in both 2004 (1.0%) and 2017 (1.3%). This rate is also comparable with that found also in adults of all ages, as well as in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children and the Millenium Cohort Study (Brugha et al., 2016). It is possible that increased reports in clinical practice reflect increased recognition by parents and practitioners , rather than an increase in the number of children with difficulties with social communication and interaction (Russell et al., 2015). However it should be noted that due to the relatively small numbers of cases identified in the sample, prevalence estimates in this topic report lack precision.
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Inpatient provision for children and young people with mental health problems. July 2017

Inpatient provision for children and young people with mental health problems. July 2017

on patients with anorexia nervosa, inpatient care and community provision show similar results which has led to a debate about the value of inpatient treatment for this disorder. For young people with psychosis, intensive care in the community appears to be as effective as admission. For the above reasons, any discussion of capacity within inpatient care also needs to consider the availability of appropriate care in the community. Some areas provide intensive community services which can help young people avoid admission to hospital, or to be discharged from hospital back to their local community. They can track high-risk patients in the community or provide back up support for young people remaining with their families or in the care of their local authority. These services are often described as ‘Tier 3 plus’ or ‘intensive outreach’ services. The Royal College of Psychiatrists recommends that “Intensive outreach services should be comprehensively commissioned by responsible commissioning groups and health boards to ensure an even distribution around the UK”. 59
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Enhancing early engagement with mental health services by young people

Enhancing early engagement with mental health services by young people

surveyed felt that the Internet had helped a little or a lot with a mental health, alcohol, or other substance use problem, and that 85% of young people surveyed would recommend it to a friend or family member. In addition, 94% felt somewhat satisfied or very satisfied with the information provided online. The study illustrated that a general Internet search served as the primary gateway to access information about mental health and well-being, but once this initial search phase was complete, peer support groups and forums proved less popular than mental health and generalist websites. The survey respondents were less in favor of online journals, reading other people’s stories, or accessing fact sheets, but general information and question-and-answer forums were popular. 24 The paper argued that young people are using
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mind - Infoline Offers advice and support to service users; has a network of local associations in England and Wales to which people can turn for help. 0300 123 3393, text number: 86463 http://www.mind.org.uk SANE Provides practical help, emotional support and specialist information for people aged 16 and over with mental health problems, their family, friends and carers. 0300 304 7000 www.sane.org.uk

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Participation in a youth mental health organisation: impacts on  resilience of young people

Participation in a youth mental health organisation: impacts on resilience of young people

Social support is particularly important for new mothers. The perinatal period is a time of significant change in personal relationships, including changes in support derived from partners, other family members, and from peers (Gao et al.,2014, Leahy-Warren, 2011). It is also a time of significant personal and interpersonal change, including changes in social support derived from partners, other family members, and peers (Gao et al., 2014, Leahy-Warren, 2011). Outcomes associated with high social support for new mothers in the perinatal period include: increased confidence (Leahy-Warren 2005), high maternal parental self-efficacy (MPSE) (Leahy-Warren et al. 2011, Shorey et al. 2014), decreased risk of antenatal (Zeng et al., 2015), and postnatal depression (PND) (Leahy-Warren et al. 2012), and an increase in infant bonding (Kinsey et al. 2014) and infant attachment (Condon and Corkindale 1998). Furthermore, low social support for mothers is associated with low family resilience (Lennon and Heaman, 2015). As mothers are predominantly the primary caregivers, low social support may have a knock on effect on the early environment for infant and toddler health and well-being, including building resilience (Lemery-Chalfant et al., 2013). In line with best clinical practice (NICE, 2017), it is incumbent upon healthcare professionals to discuss the importance of social support with pregnant women in the antenatal period and to provide opportunity for identifying strategies to enhance the availability of social support throughout the perinatal and postpartum periods. Although a number of instruments have been developed to measure social support, none are underpinned by theory in the context of perinatal infant care practices. This short paper outlines the development of The Perinatal Infant Care Social Support (PICSS) scale, which is informed by social support and social exchange theories (Leahy-Warren et al., 2011, 2012).
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

We would now like to ask for your consent to us contacting a teacher of your or your child’s choice who knows your child the best. We’ll send them an email with a secure link to a short online questionnaire that we’ll ask them to fill out and we’ll also send them a paper copy in the post. Their participation is invaluable and helps create a fuller picture of <child name>’s health and wellbeing. All information will remain confidential…

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The Mental Health of Children and Young People (MHCYP) survey was conducted with 5 to 15 year olds living in Britain in 1999 and 5 to 16 year olds living in Britain in 2004. The 1999 and 2004 surveys sampled from Child Benefit records. For the 2017 survey a stratified multistage random probability sample of 18,029 children was drawn from NHS Patient Register in October 2016. Children and young people were eligible to take part if they were aged 2 to 19, lived in England, and were registered with a GP. Children, young people and their parents were interviewed face-to-face at home using a combination of Computer Assisted Personal Interview (CAPI) and Computer Assisted Self Interview (CASI), between January and October 2017. A short paper or online questionnaire was completed by a nominated teacher for children aged 5 to 16 years old. Data collection varied with the selected child’s age:
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The Mental Health of Children and Young People (MHCYP) survey was conducted with 5 to 15 year olds living in Britain in 1999 and 5 to 16 year olds living in Britain in 2004. The 1999 and 2004 surveys sampled from Child Benefit records. For the 2017 survey a stratified multistage random probability sample of 18,029 children was drawn from NHS Patient Register in October 2016. Children and young people were eligible to take part if they were aged 2 to 19, lived in England, and were registered with a GP. Children, young people and their parents were interviewed face-to-face at home using a combination of Computer Assisted Personal Interview (CAPI) and Computer Assisted Self Interview (CASI), between January and October 2017. A short paper or online questionnaire was completed by a nominated teacher for children aged 5 to 16 years old. Data collection varied with the selected child’s age:
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Do Young People See Mental Health as Part of their Cultural Identity?

Do Young People See Mental Health as Part of their Cultural Identity?

‘Fair Society, Healthy Lives’ (The Marmot Review) Children’s centres and other early years settings, schools and colleges are vital to effective health promotion and prevention and those developing local health and well-being strategies need to find effective and mutually beneficial ways of working with them. This can be done in a number of ways and already we have heard through the forum how local areas are developing new ways of working with schools to improve health outcomes. Locally, the Director of Children’s Services has a statutory responsibility to act as the champion of children and their parents and will play a particular role in ensuring this encompasses both health, social and educational outcomes. The HWB and the local strategies they design and implement will be the key to a planned programme of engagement with local schools.
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Young people s help-seeking for mental health problems

Young people s help-seeking for mental health problems

Influences on men’s professional psychological help-seeking. The reported reluctance of males to seek help for psychological distress suggests that those who do eventually seek mental health care may have been strongly influenced by others. To date, however, no research has explored the extent to which others have influenced males attending outpatient psychological services. Study 14 considered some of the influences on men’s professional psychological help-seeking in a sample of men who were currently receiving or who had received professional psychological services within the past 12 months (Cusack, Deane, Wilson & Ciarrochi, 2004). Only 3 (6%) claimed that they were not influenced by anyone else in their decision to seek help. In marked contrast, about a third claimed that they would not have sought help without the influence of others. Of the 47 (94%) who were influenced to some extent by others to seek help, 27 (57%) indicated that they were influenced by a GP or other health professional, 26 (55%) were influenced by their intimate partner, 22 (47%) by parents or other family members, 19 (40%) by friends, and 3 (6%) by a legal professional. The majority (72%) was influenced by more than one source. A few participants also reported that they were influenced by work colleagues, Centrelink staff, and a men’s group. This study confirmed the importance of already established relationships in the help-seeking process, such as relationships with a partner or GP.
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<p>Health care professional perceptions of online information and support for young people with cancer in the United Kingdom</p>

<p>Health care professional perceptions of online information and support for young people with cancer in the United Kingdom</p>

Similar to young people ’ s views, 14 HCPs were gener- ally satis fi ed by the factual information about cancer and treatment available online for young people who were at diagnosis or on treatment. In contrast to previous studies with adult cancer patients that indicated a reluctance to recommend online information, 15,20,23,24 we found HCPs directed young people to websites from the point of diag- nosis, especially those with a reported reputation for being accurate, such as Macmillan Cancer Support, Cancer Research UK, and NHS Choices. Professionals described variation in online use throughout the cancer timeline similar to previous reported young people ’ s views, 14 and felt existing online information and resources for young people beyond treatment, who were relapsed, in long-term follow-up and receiving palliative care were lacking. The lack of information for young people at the end of life is recognized as being an unmet need, whether this is deliv- ered face-to-face or online. 25 Information on fertility, rela- tionships, body image, and psychological information and support were also felt to be lacking which was comparable to reports from young people. 14 Professionals also described, similar to young people, 14 that negative emo- tions drove searching for information or support online, and they needed to be aware of those young people who
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Do Young People See Mental Health as Part of their Cultural Identity?

Do Young People See Mental Health as Part of their Cultural Identity?

In young people aged 12 and older, interventions tend to be less effective. However, with this group even small effect sizes can imply relatively large social and economic benefits. Paradoxically, the highest-risk adolescents show greatest improvement. In this context perhaps more than any other, rigorous adherence to treatment protocols appears to be particularly important. All effective treatments for conduct disorder involve the family. Multisystemic therapy, brief strategic family therapy and functional family therapy appear effective for moderate-to-severe cases. Multidimensional treatment foster care is an approach practised in the USA and now being trialled in the UK for the most severely affected young people who are already in care. Cognitive behavioural therapy, although most commonly practised, has a limited evidence base. Social and problem- solving skills training, also commonly used, lacks evidence of generalisation of improvements. Anger management, frequently used with some optimism, has had some positive trials but its value across contexts is questionable. In the USA, medication is increasingly used in the treatment of conduct disorder and, in particular, risperidone is used in the management of aggression. NICE has recently included this in the guideline on treatment for conduct disorder for use in the management of explosive aggression as a short-term (up to 6 weeks) adjunct in combination with other approaches. 50
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Mental health and well being in the context of school : Young people in Scotland

Mental health and well being in the context of school : Young people in Scotland

Most people agree that the school environment is a composite of many different facets of school life. It is likely to be affected by perceptions of school itself as well as notions about teachers and peers. In other words, if pupils perceive each of these aspects to be congenial then they are likely to have an overall positive perception of the school environment. Conversely, if pupils have negative perceptions, then they are more than likely to view school negatively. Four aspects of the school environment are examined.

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Uptake of a national primary mental health program by young people in Australia

Uptake of a national primary mental health program by young people in Australia

outcomes for consumers [6] and providers [7]. To date, however, the ATAPS evaluation has not specifically ex- plored ATAPS’ performance in terms of providing care for young people as a particular at-risk population. The cur- rent paper, therefore, aims to describe the uptake of ATAPS by young people aged 12 to 25 years, the charac- teristics of this group of consumers and the interventions delivered to them. This age range was selected in order to be more inclusive given the variations in the definitions ‘young people’ by different services and researchers in- ternationally, and to facilitate comparisons with other Australian youth mental health services, such as head- space National Youth Mental Health Foundation [8], which targets 12 to 25 year olds.
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