Top PDF Online mental health support for young people. November 2017

Online mental health support for young people. November 2017

Online mental health support for young people. November 2017

Sufficient time would be needed for a pilot to be established and to allow for robust data to be collected and evaluated, especially given the considerations of adapting research to the academic year. A minimum time frame for a project of this kind would be one year. Further research could also explore some of the interesting findings from our analysis of XenZone’s data. For example, research could explore the topic of gender and online counselling use to see if girls are more likely to refer themselves to online counselling, if boys are more likely to use the service at a younger age, and if young people are more willing to be open about gender fluidity due to the anonymous nature of online provision. Similarly, research could be conducted to ascertain whether young people from certain backgrounds, such as those of a minority ethnic background, are more willing to access support online. Finally, studies could also explore whether young people are more likely to present with certain issues online than in face-to-face counselling, such as self-harm or disclosing abuse and whether it is suitable for all mental health problems, including externalising conditions such as conduct disorder.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

A household was classified as in receipt of 'low income benefits' if any resident adult with parental responsibility for the child reported being in receipt of any of: Housing Benefit, Working Tax Credit, Income Support, Universal Credit (UC), Job Seekers' Allowance, or Pension Credit. Child Tax Credit did not count as the eligible income threshold for this is higher. While UC could be received for disability-related reasons this was not distinguishable in the data collected.

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Welfare benefits A household was classified as in receipt of 'low income benefits' if any resident adult with parental responsibility for the child reported being in receipt of any of the following: Housing Benefit, Working Tax Credit, Income Support, Universal Credit (UC), Job Seekers' Allowance, or Pension Credit. Child Tax Credit did not count as the eligible income threshold for this is higher. While UC could be received for disability- related reasons this was not distinguishable in the data collected.

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Welfare benefits A household was classified as in receipt of 'low income benefits' if any resident adult with parental responsibility for the child reported being in receipt of any of the following: Housing Benefit, Working Tax Credit, Income Support, Universal Credit (UC), Job Seekers' Allowance, or Pension Credit. Child Tax Credit did not count as the eligible income threshold for this is higher. While UC could be received for disability-related reasons this was not distinguishable in the data collected.

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Welfare benefits A household was classified as in receipt of 'low income benefits' if any resident adult with parental responsibility for the child reported being in receipt of any of the following: Housing Benefit, Working Tax Credit, Income Support, Universal Credit (UC), Job Seekers' Allowance, or Pension Credit. Child Tax Credit did not count as the eligible income threshold for this is higher. While UC could be received for disability- related reasons this was not distinguishable in the data collected.

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

the important role of schools, which has been formally recognised in the green paper (DH and DoE, 2017). Most children with a disorder had some recent contact with services due to their mental health, although only one in four had contact with specialist mental health services. Children whose difficulties were recognised by an adult in their lives were more likely to be in contact with services than other children. The survey found that levels of satisfaction with support were generally high, although some children do report waiting more than six months to be seen. The findings in this survey should provide a valuable resource for commissioners and providers in developing existing services and in taking forward the green paper’s new proposals.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

38 Discussion The effects of new technology and social media on overall health and wellbeing are still relatively unknown. Sampasa-Kanyinga and Lewis (2015) found an independent association between using social media sites for more than two hours per day and self-reported poor mental health, increased levels of psychological distress and suicidal ideation. This prevalence survey also found an association between mental disorders and spending more than four hours on social media per day, whether it was a school or non-school day. Young people with a disorder were also more likely to agree that they spend longer online than they intend to.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Young people aged 17 to 19 were interviewed directly; as was their parent if the young person and parent agreed. Teachers also completed an online or paper questionnaire about 5 to 16 year olds, where consent was provided. The detailed and comprehensive Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) (Goodman et al., 2000) was used to assess a range of mental health conditions, including emotional, hyperactivity, behavioural and less common disorders, like autism. After interviews had been completed, trained clinical raters reviewed the data collected to assess for a range of mental disorders for each participant.
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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mind - Infoline Offers advice and support to service users; has a network of local associations in England and Wales to which people can turn for help. 0300 123 3393, text number: 86463 http://www.mind.org.uk SANE Provides practical help, emotional support and specialist information for people aged 16 and over with mental health problems, their family, friends and carers. 0300 304 7000 www.sane.org.uk

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Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

We would now like to ask for your consent to us contacting a teacher of your or your child’s choice who knows your child the best. We’ll send them an email with a secure link to a short online questionnaire that we’ll ask them to fill out and we’ll also send them a paper copy in the post. Their participation is invaluable and helps create a fuller picture of ’s health and wellbeing. All information will remain confidential…

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Why do young people use online forums for mental health and emotional support? Benefits and challenges

Why do young people use online forums for mental health and emotional support? Benefits and challenges

Abstract A qualitative approach was used to explore young people’s experiences of using synchronous and asynchronous online forums to gain insight into the use of online services for mental health. Nineteen young people took part in two online synchronous focus groups facilitated by the online counselling service, KOOTH.com, to reflect upon the use of these two types of forum. Inductive thematic analysis indicated that forums do not replace the role of a counsellor, but they provide a valuable place for young people to gain additional, lower level support requirements. Individuals suggested the forums were supportive environments where they felt able to interact to share helpful advice and ask questions, making them feel less alone and more connected to others. Issues of concern tended to be around the affordances of the site and technical issues.
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A systematic review exploring how young people

use online forums for support around mental

health issues

A systematic review exploring how young people use online forums for support around mental health issues

The dynamic way that the online forums evolved to support the mental health needs of young people did however prove different than expected at times. For instance, many of the forums organically adapted to the needs of the communities in slightly surprising ways – a discussion about self-harming behaviour might be interspersed (concurrently or sequentially) with conversations about music, or a practical conversation about a health condition might become much more emotionally focused. In a time when psychological support leans towards more manualised and standardised approaches, the responsive nature of the forum spaces in these papers appeared refreshing, if potentially anxiety producing for professionals. The young users, in their diverse and creative use of technology, therefore helped to remind us of the need for mental health support to respect the whole human behind the screen. Echoing some of these sentiments, one professional involved in a trial project included in the review noted:
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Peer communication in online mental health forums for young
people:directional and nondirectional support

Peer communication in online mental health forums for young people:directional and nondirectional support

those with suicidal thoughts [21,22], and young people with mentally ill parents [23]. The way in which young people use online forums is of increasing interest to researchers. Help-seeking behaviors related to how individuals gain information and support around issues linked to their physical and mental health needs is of particular interest. A notable benefit of online support groups is that the groups are available 24/7, which enables users to receive support and advice when more traditional resources are unavailable [24]. Online support groups also offer the convenience of support from similar people from within their own homes [25]. Research has started to explore the effects of online support for young people with mental health problems and other health issues with results indicating that online forums provide them with emotional and informational support [15,26-28], they can decrease isolation and stress [15,28], and reduce symptoms such as depression [21] and self-harm [20]. In a study looking at the viability of online blogs as a research methodology for young people with arthritis, Prescott et al [29] found that the online environment gave them space and empowerment to express their own ideas and concerns. The young people in the study found blogging to be therapeutic and enabled them to provide detailed thoughts, feelings, and experiences beneficial to researchers of an often hard to reach sample. Indeed, earlier research of an online university mental health community found participants benefited from the therapeutic benefit of writing [11]. Ultimately, online forums have the potential to provide a private and emotionally safe environment; this is especially so for forums that are moderated [30]. Furthermore, online forums maybe particularly appealing to young males who tend to have lower levels of help-seeking behavior than their female counterparts [4]. Peer Support
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Mental Health Service Models for Young People

Mental Health Service Models for Young People

Box 4. Schools-Based Models Place2Be is a children’s MH charity, which provides an integrated, whole-school approach to CYP MH. 32 The whole-school approach aims to promote the social and emotional wellbeing of CYP, moving beyond learning and teaching, into all aspects of school life. 47 In 2016/17, Place2Be worked directly with 282 schools and provided training to a further 100 schools. Place2Be focuses on early intervention, providing a variety of MH support to help CYP deal with life challenges and build resilience. Place2Be has enlisted over 1000 volunteers on placement, most of whom are college/university students working towards a MH qualification. Volunteers of placement deliver counselling sessions for children in schools supervised by a Place2Be manager who oversees group counselling sessions and self-referral sessions for pupils along with support for teachers and parents. 32 These managers use tablets to collect data and feedback from teachers quickly and easily, and to assess changes in CYP behavioural, emotional and social wellbeing. This anonymised data can then be easily shared for monitoring and evaluation. 48 The Mental Health Services and Schools Links Pilots were launched in 255 schools in 2015 by the Department for Education and NHS England. They aimed to establish points of contact in schools and in NHS CAMHS to improve the clarity of local pathways to NHS CAMHS from a school perspective and to reduce inappropriate referrals and to support efficient use of local resources. 33 Representatives from CCGs, NHS CAMHS workers, schools’ MH leaders, and other local area organisations came together in a series of workshops to develop a better understanding of local CYPMHS. 49 An evaluation of the pilots in 2017 found that they strengthened communication and joint-working between schools and NHS CAMHS, and contributed to faster and more appropriate referrals. The report noted concerns about the cost and sustainability of providing the required support, and the lack of resources available to deliver the scheme across all schools. 33 However, some CCGs have extended the model to additional schools in their area. 50
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The mental health of young people with experiences of homelessness

The mental health of young people with experiences of homelessness

125 going to the GP and subsequently access emergency services when illnesses or injuries require urgent attention. Unsurprisingly, the conditions most closely linked to alcohol and drug service use were alcohol and drug dependence. However, 73.5% of those meeting criteria for substance dependence were not using these services. Substance abuse was not associated with use of this service, so those with less extreme but potentially problematic alcohol and drug issues were less likely to be receiving specialist support. Substance abuse was associated with lower use of hospital services. Many of the participants were using alcohol regularly in a way that can be harmful to health but did not meet criteria for dependence on alcohol. Alcohol abuse or ‘binge drinking’ was fairly common. Nonetheless, this group may have had less need for hospital services, at least in the short term. This was somewhat surprising as injuries that occur when intoxicated tend to be common, but this finding is supported by research that suggests drug and alcohol issues are associated with low levels of perceived functional disability (Bijl & Ravelli, 2000). It is only when issues relating to drugs and alcohol reach more extreme levels that help is sought, recommended or mandated by external organisations.
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The Mental Health Needs of Homeless Young People Bright Futures:Working with Vulnerable Young People

The Mental Health Needs of Homeless Young People Bright Futures:Working with Vulnerable Young People

Fitzpatrick (2000), Safe on the Streets (1999),Keep (2000) Lilley (2000),Safe on the Streets (1999),Wrate and Blair (1999),West (1999) Lilley (2000) Fitzpatrick (2000) Safe on the Streets (1999) Tischler et al.(2000) Hargreaves (1999) Early intervention and support for families Education Employment and Training Professional training Provision of specialist voluntary sector services P P P and / or R P P and / or R For example:the Sure Start,Children’s Fund and Connexions programmes,respite care for children and young people,family mediation,family group conferences,parenting support (especially for parents of teenagers). Reduce familial tension and prevent family break up / entry to care.Where this is not possible,at least help to plan the next steps. Identification of,and support for,problematic behaviour by schools. Importance of economic as well as social support needs to be recognised. Role of schools in helping young people learn about the processes of development,parenting,social and emotional relationships.Putting mental health issues into their broader context. Health promotion and awareness raising. Peer support / educators. ‘Running away’/ ‘homelessness’as a topic within the personal,social and health education curriculum. Improve chances of accessing and sustaining employment. Financial security needed. Provide individual with a sense of worth,self esteem and independence. Staff training,particularly in relation to drug awareness,sexuality and sexual health,and mental health. Ensure that housing staff make appropriate referrals. Needs to be a rolling programme to maintain effectiveness. For people,particularly refugees,who are cautious about dealing with ‘government agencies’. Less stigmatised.
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Online counselling: With particular focus on young people and support

Online counselling: With particular focus on young people and support

Certainly, a benefit of online counselling using text is the ability for the client to review the session at a later date. This can be extremely empowering (Oravec, 2000). As computer systems and packages become more compatible, there will be the added advantage of speaking using a microphone and both counsellor and client being able to see one another via webcam, giving the client the option to vary the manner in which they use online technology. Such technology may be useful for people with disabilities who lack the dexterity, or for those who reside in a remote location and choose not to use text. The speed of correspondence can be much faster with online counselling (Gaggioli, 2001) and the client may have more flexibility in the planning of their sessions. An example of this is where the client has identified some strategies they want to initiate as a part of their change process. As a part of the client and counsellor plan, the counsellor can invite the client to send an email if they are experiencing a difficulty with the implementation of their strategies. The counsellor could say agree to respond to the client within twenty four or forty eight hours depending upon the counsellors other work commitments. A person to person counselling relationship can also have a place for the use of online technology in between sessions. There could be advantages within mental health organisations where client relapse is extremely high. Online counselling in isolation from other modalities is not recommended for crisis work (C. Hunt, Shochet, I., & King, R., 2005). However, online counselling can be the initial contact between counsellor and client and act as a point of referral.
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Improving the mental health of Looked After Young People: An exploration of mental health stigma.

Improving the mental health of Looked After Young People: An exploration of mental health stigma.

• All foster carers and residential workers must have training in supporting the mental health needs of young people. This needs to be backed up with regular supervision and reflective support sessions. • Young people leaving care need to know that they can have support when they move out of their placements as this can be a very anxious time for them and most feel vulnerable and insecure. Young people stated that it was particularly helpful when they continued to have contact with residential workers from the placement where they had previously lived or other adults with whom they already had a positive relationship with.
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Transformation of mental health services for children and young people in England

Transformation of mental health services for children and young people in England

(6) Facilitative administration is key to any effective service-improvement implementation and is central to the success of disseminating EBPs. Facilitative administration provides leadership and makes use of a range of data inputs to inform decision-making, support the overall processes, and keep staff organized and focused on the desired intervention outcomes. Policies, procedures, structures, culture, and climate are given careful attention to ensure they are aligned with the needs of practitioners learning and implementing EBPs. To this end, the training of service managers/clinical leads is an integral component of the project. This comprises approximately 12 days of training which aims to develop competency in leading service change to deliver evidence-based, quality-driven, outcomes-informed services. Additional aims are: (a) to have critical knowledge of the theoretical, research and implementation literature that underpins service change and (b) to enable service leaders to make the necessary changes in their services during the training course. The course typically involves producing a 4-5,000-word report on a local project, conducted as part of the training that initiates and evaluates a local service change consistent with the principles and ethos of the national project.
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Young people s help-seeking for mental health problems

Young people s help-seeking for mental health problems

Teachers. For young people still at school, teachers are an easily accessibly source of support. Study 8 examined the help-seeking intentions of 18 high school teachers themselves, aiming to determine whether teachers had a favourable orientation toward seeking help. Consistent with other samples, teachers were more likely to go to informal sources of help such as family and friends than formal sources such as mental health professionals or GPs. Unexpectedly, the teachers were more likely to indicate that they would seek help from no-one for a personal-emotional problem compared with students from the high school in which they taught. However, for suicidal thoughts, teachers had higher intentions to seek help from formal sources (e.g., mental health professionals and GPs) than their students. Themes from the focus group discussions suggested a number of negative influences on the professional help-seeking of teachers including concerns regarding the competency of clinicians, the effectiveness of treatment, fears of stigma, and anxiety about the professional help-seeking experience.
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