Top PDF Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Personal, social, health and economic education
in schools (England)

Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

substances] has begun to grow in our communities. 49 Lyn Brown criticised a lack of “comprehensive drug education” in England, arguing that a better approach was taken in Wales, where education was “at the forefront” of drugs prevention policy. 50 Lyn Brown supported statutory PSHE as “an important tool in our fight against psychoactive drugs and those who push them,” 51 and said that the amendment for progress on education to be included in the review of the Act “would focus minds in the Home Office and compel it to put in place the most effective and comprehensive awareness campaign possible.” 52
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Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

substances] has begun to grow in our communities. 50 Lyn Brown criticised a lack of “comprehensive drug education” in England, arguing that a better approach was taken in Wales, where education was “at the forefront” of drugs prevention policy. 51 Lyn Brown supported statutory PSHE as “an important tool in our fight against psychoactive drugs and those who push them,” 52 and said that the amendment for progress on education to be included in the review of the Act “would focus minds in the Home Office and compel it to put in place the most effective and comprehensive awareness campaign possible.” 53
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Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

substances] has begun to grow in our communities. 49 Lyn Brown criticised a lack of “comprehensive drug education” in England, arguing that a better approach was taken in Wales, where education was “at the forefront” of drugs prevention policy. 50 Lyn Brown supported statutory PSHE as “an important tool in our fight against psychoactive drugs and those who push them,” 51 and said that the amendment for progress on education to be included in the review of the Act “would focus minds in the Home Office and compel it to put in place the most effective and comprehensive awareness campaign possible.” 52
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Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

substances] has begun to grow in our communities. 40 Lyn Brown criticised a lack of “comprehensive drug education” in England, arguing that a better approach was taken in Wales, where education was “at the forefront” of drugs prevention policy. 41 Lyn Brown supported statutory PSHE as “an important tool in our fight against psychoactive drugs and those who push them,” 42 and said that the amendment for progress on education to be included in the review of the Act “would focus minds in the Home Office and compel it to put in place the most effective and comprehensive awareness campaign possible.” 43
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Briefing Paper: Number 07303: 16 December 2016: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Briefing Paper: Number 07303: 16 December 2016: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

substances] has begun to grow in our communities. 49 Lyn Brown criticised a lack of “comprehensive drug education” in England, arguing that a better approach was taken in Wales, where education was “at the forefront” of drugs prevention policy. 50 Lyn Brown supported statutory PSHE as “an important tool in our fight against psychoactive drugs and those who push them,” 51 and said that the amendment for progress on education to be included in the review of the Act “would focus minds in the Home Office and compel it to put in place the most effective and comprehensive awareness campaign possible.” 52
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07303, 2 March 2017: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07303, 2 March 2017: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

substances] has begun to grow in our communities. 49 Lyn Brown criticised a lack of “comprehensive drug education” in England, arguing that a better approach was taken in Wales, where education was “at the forefront” of drugs prevention policy. 50 Lyn Brown supported statutory PSHE as “an important tool in our fight against psychoactive drugs and those who push them,” 51 and said that the amendment for progress on education to be included in the review of the Act “would focus minds in the Home Office and compel it to put in place the most effective and comprehensive awareness campaign possible.” 52
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Improving health education practice in secondary school: A social ecological examination of personal and social education policy implementation processes and practice in Welsh secondary schools.

Improving health education practice in secondary school: A social ecological examination of personal and social education policy implementation processes and practice in Welsh secondary schools.

and views about pedagogic approaches that are deemed appropriate for delivering PSE. 6.4.Chapter summary It was evident that decision-making around PSE was strongly influenced by a policy context focused on measurable performance indicators affecting all levels of influence on PSE policy sense-making. However, such competing priorities were not acknowledged in the PSE framework. The influence of exam performance appeared to be evident at all levels of implementation and reflects earlier findings about PSHE in England (Formby 2011; Whitty 2002). Although not recognised in the PSE framework, implementers were clearly aware that grades will continue to dominate what secondary schools are about. How this prioritization shapes practice seemed mediated by head teachers’ views of PSE and related decision-making about arrangements for PSE provision. Additional policy pressures seemed to reinforce this focus on examined subjects and written evidence of pupils’ activities. This focus on exam grades appeared to shape resource allocation and timetabling in schools. The allocation of unwilling staff to teach PSE, particularly in one of the four participating schools, reinforced the separation of this subject from the core curriculum. Linked to this, some staff seemed frustrated about their inability to teach PSE as they consider it appropriate for pupils.
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"The monster of the month": Teachers’ views about alcohol within personal, social and health education (PSHE) in schools

"The monster of the month": Teachers’ views about alcohol within personal, social and health education (PSHE) in schools

There was evidence in the transcripts to demonstrate the participants’ commitment to PSHE as a vital part of the curriculum. Despite the challenges, including funding and training issues, it was evident that the interviewees were passionate about preparing their students for adult life. While these teachers most likely self-selected into the study because of this passion, other research suggests that there are considerable knowledge and training gaps in health education (Van Hout et al., 2012). This means that PSHE teachers are often faced with the challenge of equipping other teachers in their school with materials and relying on untrained colleagues to deliver them. In this scenario, it is unsurprising that many of the teachers were positive about using outside speakers, such as recovered alcoholics, to deliver alcohol related sessions. However, as some of the teachers discussed, this could be counter-productive if adolescents were exposed to someone who has
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Ethos, Personal, Social and Health Education and Self-esteem: perceptions of teachers and students in Catholic and common secondary schools

Ethos, Personal, Social and Health Education and Self-esteem: perceptions of teachers and students in Catholic and common secondary schools

23 important attributes that need to be developed. There is no dispute about the need for good academic qualifications, especially as we compete in a growing global community (with regard for example to Programme for International Student Assessment statistics provided by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development). However, I was in no doubt that students need to be skilled in other areas such as personal and social education. In a world that is becoming more threatening, where, for example, terrorism and the possibility of the presence of knife crime is prevalent, students need the skills to able to assess a situation and to know how to react to get the best out of it. Without such skills, students are at a severe disadvantage, not only in the world of work, but also in the world generally. In many disciplines some children know themselves to be very adept and successful, but many lack an understanding of the importance of how to connect successfully with others and make the most of situations in which they find themselves. As my teaching career developed, I became more convinced that the need for developing good interpersonal skills had increased rather than decreased. I have also noticed that the behaviour of children had become more egotistical over the years, perhaps owing to the increasing technical media world in which they find themselves and I therefore believe that the development of interpersonal skills is essential.
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Social, Personal & Health Education

Social, Personal & Health Education

Teachers and schools will need to take time to explore the nature and role of assessment in SPHE and to decide on the most effective ways of using it in order to enhance and complement the learning and teaching in the school. There will be a greater possibility of continuity and progression in SPHE in the school where there is a common language and approach to observing, describing, discussing and reporting on children’s progress. Time spent discussing and sharing ideas will enhance communication among staff, with parents and with individual children and will ensure that the assessment is used in the most positive and helpful way. Assessment in this curricular area cannot be seen in isolation, as it will be directly related to the assessment in other subjects and to any assessment that may take place of the school climate and atmosphere. Roles of assessment: why assess in SPHE?
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Personal Social Health & Economic (PSHE) Education under the coalition government

Personal Social Health & Economic (PSHE) Education under the coalition government

Unfortunately, the local authority did not at the time of the research have such closely established working links with primary schools and they were not able to provide us with a primary school list of PSHE leads or equivalents. We therefore called all primary schools in the local authority and requested the name and contact details of the PSHE lead or equivalent. Following conversations with school administrators, we were rarely provided with the details of a designated PSHE lead. The reason for this for the majority of primary schools was that this role did not exist within the school, or the administrator was not aware there was such a role within the school. Additionally some schools' data protection policies prevented administrative staff from divulging contact details. The consequence of this was that it was often necessary to send an information sheet and survey link to a generic school administrator email address with a request that it be passed onto the most appropriate individual to complete the survey. Where there was no formal PSHE lead/coordinator role in the school, we asked for the survey to be sent to the most appropriate staff member, for example, head of Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL), pastoral lead, or member of staff with responsibility for pupil
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Personal Social Health & Economic (PSHE) Education under the coalition government

Personal Social Health & Economic (PSHE) Education under the coalition government

Unfortunately, the local authority did not at the time of the research have such closely established working links with primary schools and they were not able to provide us with a primary school list of PSHE leads or equivalents. We therefore called all primary schools in the local authority and requested the name and contact details of the PSHE lead or equivalent. Following conversations with school administrators, we were rarely provided with the details of a designated PSHE lead. The reason for this for the majority of primary schools was that this role did not exist within the school, or the administrator was not aware there was such a role within the school. Additionally some schools' data protection policies prevented administrative staff from divulging contact details. The consequence of this was that it was often necessary to send an information sheet and survey link to a generic school administrator email address with a request that it be passed onto the most appropriate individual to complete the survey. Where there was no formal PSHE lead/coordinator role in the school, we asked for the survey to be sent to the most appropriate staff member, for example, head of Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL), pastoral lead, or member of staff with responsibility for pupil
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Personal, social, health
and economic (PSHE)
education: A mapping
study of the prevalent
models of delivery and
their effectiveness

Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education: A mapping study of the prevalent models of delivery and their effectiveness

Overall, this illustrates that the use of the Ofsted measures not only reduces the statistical precision but introduces some bias which could undermine the validity of inferring the sample results to the wider population. To try and resolve the problem of limited Ofsted judgement availability, 2008/09 judgements were merged with the 2009/10 judgements. This helps to boost the sample size in both primary and secondary schools to 46% (n=426) and 47% (n=292) respectively. For some Ofsted judgements, word or phrase changes made it unreasonable to combine these (as they were not capturing identical things) but three judgements were identified that maintained consistent wording across the two years. The three judgements were:
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Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education: a mapping study of the prevalent models of delivery and their effectiveness RR080

Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education: a mapping study of the prevalent models of delivery and their effectiveness RR080

Overall, this illustrates that the use of the Ofsted measures not only reduces the statistical precision but introduces some bias which could undermine the validity of inferring the sample results to the wider population. To try and resolve the problem of limited Ofsted judgement availability, 2008/09 judgements were merged with the 2009/10 judgements. This helps to boost the sample size in both primary and secondary schools to 46% (n=426) and 47% (n=292) respectively. For some Ofsted judgements, word or phrase changes made it unreasonable to combine these (as they were not capturing identical things) but three judgements were identified that maintained consistent wording across the two years. The three judgements were:
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Social, Personal and Health Education

Social, Personal and Health Education

Attempts at completing tasks often lead to feelings of frustration rather than feelings of accomplishment. Instead of building up self-esteem, the students’ attempts often lead to feelings of insecurity about themselves, which in turn create secondary emotional problems. In order to encourage each student to learn that he/she has an important part to play in the whole scheme of things, it is of the utmost importance to build up the individual’s personal profile, highlighting their unique features, personal preferences, particular strengths, and abilities. Celebration of each student’s uniqueness should be supported by the ethos and culture of the school. This is especially relevant for students with mild general learning disabilities, as it enhances the image of each student in the eyes of parents, peers, classroom staff, and all those who have regular contact with the student.
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Economic and Personal Finance Education in Our Nation s Schools

Economic and Personal Finance Education in Our Nation s Schools

Fortunately, Economics Arkansas was prepared to take immediate action. According to Owens, providing teachers with the support to confidently teach economics “was a commitment we made to the Arkansas Department of Education. We told them since our organization led the initiative for the requirement; we will be the resource for training, so our organization developed an activities-based training curriculum with lessons for educators to teach the economics and personal finance standards.” In the first summer after the requirement was announced, Economics Arkansas held six workshops across the state to prepare teachers, plus they offered additional training based on requests from school districts. Last year, Economics Arkansas partnered with the Federal Reserve Bank of St Louis to update the curriculum.
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Personal, Social and Health Education in the Sixth Form

Personal, Social and Health Education in the Sixth Form

Personal, Social and Health Education in the Sixth Form The programme of PSHE in the Sixth Form is delivered through a range of opportunities. Central to the programme is the series of weekly presentations “QI Friday” organised by the Head of General Studies. The range of themes is broad and incorporates the programme of careers education and elements of the General Studies programme as well as some work on study skills. In the Lower Sixth three ‘Carousels’ of activities allow smaller groups to meet to consider relevant personal issues. The content is adapted slightly from year to year but is based around three themes:
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SURVEYOF THE STATES ECONOMIC AND PERSONAL FINANCE EDUCATION IN OUR NATION S SCHOOLS

SURVEYOF THE STATES ECONOMIC AND PERSONAL FINANCE EDUCATION IN OUR NATION S SCHOOLS

students develop better credit behaviors early in adulthood. Students who gradu- ate after more rigorous standards are put into place are more likely to make on-time payments and keep up with their bills—they still use debt and credit, but seem to understand how to manage those obligations better than students who did not graduate under higher standards for personal finance and eco- nomics. The figure below shows the difference in credit scores for students who graduated before financial educa- tion mandates were imposed, relative to comparable states and controlling for local trends. Student credit scores are 8 to 17 points higher by age 22 in three key states that made a change in financial education policies in 2007.
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Templeorum Whole School Plan. Social, Personal and Health Education (S.P.H.E.)

Templeorum Whole School Plan. Social, Personal and Health Education (S.P.H.E.)

• develop an understanding of healthy living, an ability to implement healthy behaviour and a willingness to participate in activities that promote and sustain health • develop a sense of safety and an ability to protect himself/herself from danger and abuse • make decisions, solve problems and take appropriate actions in various personal, social and health contexts • become aware of, and discerning about, the various influences on choices and decisions

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Schools, Education and Social Exclusion

Schools, Education and Social Exclusion

“We should root out educational failure, because it is the greatest inhibition to correcting poverty…in today’s world, the more you learn the more you earn.” (“The will to win” speech, June, 1997) Opponents of the human capital model argue that little of the variation between individual’s earnings and labour market participation is explained by education. The ‘signalling’ or ‘screening’ paradigm suggests that the process of education merely serves to identify individual ability or personal attributes. From this perspective the positive correlation between education and income arises because they are commonly founded in an individual’s ability. Educational attainment merely allows individuals to signal their high level ability and low prospective training costs to employers. In its most extreme and ‘ideal typical’ form, screening implies that qualifications provide valid information to employers about characteristics of the individual to
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