Top PDF Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Personal, social, health and economic education
in schools (England)

Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

What is most baffling about this decision is that the Government has a range of objectives it seeks to achieve through PSHE education, including teaching pupils to stay safe online, promoting children and young people’s mental health and preventing radicalisation, child sexual exploitation and violence against women and girls. Its decision not to address a status quo in which these issues are addressed by untrained teachers in inadequate curriculum time – or left off the curriculum altogether – is self-defeating and leaves vulnerable young people at risk. 37

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Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

development of a new, rigorous PSHE quality mark. This will give parents more information about the quality of a school’s PSHE provision and will highlight schools which are already providing opportunities for wider development for their pupils through PSHE. It will make it easier for schools struggling in this area to work with the best. The new PSHE quality mark will be brought in line with similar accreditations of its type which require schools to provide evidence for the depth and quality of their teaching in a particular area. The new accreditation will drive improvement in the subject, with many schools seeking the award expected to make tangible improvements to their teaching to achieve the quality mark. 31
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07303, 2 March 2017: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 07303, 2 March 2017: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Teaching required improvement in 42% of primary and 38% of secondary schools. Too many teachers lacked expertise in teaching sensitive and controversial issues, which resulted in some topics such as sexuality, mental health and domestic violence being omitted from the curriculum. This was because subject-specific training and support were too often inadequate. In 20% of schools, staff had received little or no training to teach PSHE education. Teaching was not good in any of these schools. 17

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Briefing Paper: Number 07303: 16 December 2016: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Briefing Paper: Number 07303: 16 December 2016: Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

In a Written Ministerial Statement on 5 November 2009 the then Secretary of State, Ed Balls, announced his decision to proceed with legislation to make PSHE education part of the statutory National Curriculum in both primary and secondary education, and that parents’ right to withdraw their children from sex and relationship education (SRE) should continue but only until their children reach the age of 15, so that every young person would receive at least one year of SRE before the end of compulsory education. 43

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Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

In a Written Ministerial Statement on 5 November 2009 the then Secretary of State, Ed Balls, announced his decision to proceed with legislation to make PSHE education part of the statutory National Curriculum in both primary and secondary education, and that parents’ right to withdraw their children from sex and relationship education (SRE) should continue but only until their children reach the age of 15, so that every young person would receive at least one year of SRE before the end of compulsory education. 44

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Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Personal, social, health and economic education in schools (England)

Teaching required improvement in 42% of primary and 38% of secondary schools. Too many teachers lacked expertise in teaching sensitive and controversial issues, which resulted in some topics such as sexuality, mental health and domestic violence being omitted from the curriculum. This was because subject-specific training and support were too often inadequate. In 20% of schools, staff had received little or no training to teach PSHE education. Teaching was not good in any of these schools. 17

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Defining and measuring the contribution of Anglican secondary schools to students' religious, personal and social values

Defining and measuring the contribution of Anglican secondary schools to students' religious, personal and social values

provided a significant contribution to the state-maintained sector of education in England and Wales and by the end of the twentieth century were providing about 25% of primary school places and nearly 5% of secondary school places. From the early 1970s, Francis and his colleagues have offered a series of studies profiling the attitudes and values of students attending Anglican schools as a way of defining and measuring the influence exerted by schools with a religious character. The present study extends previous research in three ways. It offers a comparative study by examining the responses of 1,097 year-nine and year-ten students from 4 Anglican schools with 20,348 students from 93 schools without a religious foundation. It examines a range of religious, social and personal values. It employs multilevel linear models to identify the contribution made by Anglican schools after taking into account differences within the students themselves. Of the 11 dependent variables tested, only one, self-esteem, showed any significant difference between Anglican schools and schools without a religious foundation. Students attending Anglican schools recorded a significantly lower level of self-esteem. On the other hand, there were no significant school effects identified in terms of rejection of drug use, endorsing illegal behaviours, racism, attitude toward school, conservative Christian belief or views on sexual morality (abortion, contraception, divorce, homosexuality, and sex outside marriage).
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Measuring the contribution of independent Christian secondary schools to students' religious, personal, and social values

Measuring the contribution of independent Christian secondary schools to students' religious, personal, and social values

The first theologically-informed aim of the independent Christian school sector concerned the importance of academic achievement and the provision of high quality education which would enable students to perform better than they might have done in their local state-maintained school. The data suggest that in many ways this aim was being achieved. Many former students praised the high academic standards achieved in their schools which they linked with small class sizes, dedicated teachers, close relationships between home and school and the individualisation of the education process. However, they were also well aware of the effect of limited and, at times, insecure finances, and small student numbers, which placed restrictions on subject choice and teachers as well as resources and facilities. One area which was highlighted by a number of students was the need to develop specific aspects of PSHE (personal, social, and health education) and cultural education, with particular reference to education concerning sex, drugs, alcohol and non- Christian religions.
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Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education: a mapping study of the prevalent models of delivery and their effectiveness RR080

Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education: a mapping study of the prevalent models of delivery and their effectiveness RR080

To try and resolve the problem of limited Ofsted judgement availability, 2008/09 judgements were merged with the 2009/10 judgements. This helps to boost the sample size in both primary and secondary schools to 46% (n=426) and 47% (n=292) respectively. For some Ofsted judgements, word or phrase changes made it unreasonable to combine these (as they were not capturing identical things) but three judgements were identified that maintained consistent wording across the two years. The three judgements were:

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Measuring the contribution of Roman Catholic secondary schools to students' religious, personal and social values

Measuring the contribution of Roman Catholic secondary schools to students' religious, personal and social values

Roman Catholic schools have been part of the state-funded system of education in England and Wales since the 1850s. Currently, Roman Catholic schools provide places for around 10% of students attending state-maintained primary and second- ary schools. The present study employed data collected during the 1990s to compare a range of religious, social, and personal values among 1,948 year 9 and year 10 students from 10 Catholic schools (between 13 and 15 years of age) with those of 20,348 students from 93 schools without a religious foundation. It builds on earlier analyses of the same database by comparing the effect of school foundation after con- trolling for the individual religiosity of pupils using multilevel linear modelling. The data showed that students attending Catholic schools were significantly differ- ent from students attending schools without a religious foundation, after control- ling for personal, contextual, psychological and religious factors, in respect of five of the 11 dependent variables tested. Students in Catholic schools were less likely to oppose drug use, more likely to support age-related illegal behaviours, had a poorer attitude toward school, and were more likely to oppose abortion or contraception. Some of these differences were related to the greater disaffection of non-religious pupils at Catholic schools compared with their counterparts in schools without a religious foundation. These findings suggest the value of conducting a comparable study during the 2010s.
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Personal, social, health
and economic (PSHE)
education: A mapping
study of the prevalent
models of delivery and
their effectiveness

Personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education: A mapping study of the prevalent models of delivery and their effectiveness

To try and resolve the problem of limited Ofsted judgement availability, 2008/09 judgements were merged with the 2009/10 judgements. This helps to boost the sample size in both primary and secondary schools to 46% (n=426) and 47% (n=292) respectively. For some Ofsted judgements, word or phrase changes made it unreasonable to combine these (as they were not capturing identical things) but three judgements were identified that maintained consistent wording across the two years. The three judgements were:

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Personal Social Health & Economic (PSHE) Education under the coalition government

Personal Social Health & Economic (PSHE) Education under the coalition government

The history of PSHE emerges from the public school notion of pastoral care, developing and caring for the whole child. There is a history of debate as to whether this type of learning and support should be the sole responsibility of parents, however some schools began teaching Personal, Social and Health Education on an informal basis throughout the 1960s to the early 1980s (Hilton 2009). The discussion continued about the need for this type of teaching, particularly around sex education, and this was added to the curriculum agenda in 1986, but not as a compulsory subject. When the national curriculum was introduced in 1988, Personal Social Health Education was not a listed subject. However by 1990 the then Conservative government stated that the curriculum had gaps where these wider concepts were missing, and introduced cross curricular themes as a way to include elements such as health and economic education throughout the curriculum. Schools were expected (but not required to) include these elements within the curriculum of compulsory subjects, and in many schools this failed to happen. Towards the late 1990s, as the curriculum was to be revisited, the Labour government set up the Preparation for Adult Life (PAL) committee, pushing for the introduction of PSHE in schools. The curriculum was revised in 1999 and PSHE was included as a non- statutory subject for all key stages. The Qualification and Curriculum Authority (QCA) set up the aims and objectives of PSHE and these were reported on by Ofsted. PSHE was described as the 'taught planned programme of teaching and learning that promotes pupils personal and social development and their health and wellbeing' (QCA 2005 p1) The first national frameworks were introduced for PSHE and citizenship in 2000. This had clearly been heavily influenced by the Education Reform Act of 1988 that highlighted (amongst other things) that the school curriculum should: 'prepare pupils for the
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E-petition 176555 relating to mental health education in schools

E-petition 176555 relating to mental health education in schools

To reflect the importance of keeping children safe online, e-safety is covered at all key stages in the computing curriculum. Children are taught: how to use technology safely and respectfully; how to keep personal information private; and where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet, or other online technologies. Schools are also able to teach pupils about the use of social media and to learn strategies for keeping physically and emotionally safe, including safety online, as part of their Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education programme of study.
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Relation of social and economic factors to health policy

Relation of social and economic factors to health policy

supported by an efficient and effective policy and actions in Lithuania, a member state, at the Euro- pean Community level and world scale (4). Cross- sectoral cooperation is needed. The fundamental value of health policy-making must be involvement of all citizens in the decision-making related to health policy, supervision, training / education, etc. Reduction of health inequality must be included. Al though many Europeans live longer and health- ier than the previous generation, but there is a lot of health inequality (that could be avoided by creating policy which would be based on the best available scientific evidence) (4). This process has to include society, public health professionals, doctors, politi- cians, press, business and so on, all of them must work, make decisions and find solutions together. Close and effective communication and collabora- tion are necessary between all sectors and public health professionals, also it is very important to collect information, ability and skills which would help to develop and improve existing characte- ristics, and reform health policy. It is necessary to find the easiest ways how to transmit these skills and experience to other professionals for avoiding any misunderstanding later. In order to achieve this goal, due attention and balance must be given to
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Greece in Economic Crisis: The Case of Health and Education

Greece in Economic Crisis: The Case of Health and Education

Summary: In 2010 the Greek economy entered a deep economic crisis. This was the result of an accumulation of structural problems in the economy, including overspending and loss of competitiveness during the previous decades, translating into persistently large budget and trade deficits. Currently in its third bailout by the EU and the IMF, the country has entered a spiral of depression that has led to its economy shrinking by one third and unemployment skyrocketing to more than 25% as a result of the austerity measures introduced as a prerequisite for the bail out funding Greece received. As a consequence, the health and education sectors have each experienced a reduction in public spending of more than one third. We look at these two sectors before the crisis in the early noughties, and find that a combination of delays, lack of enforcement and reversals of urgently needed reforms resulted to a lack of correction of obvious weaknesses. This has prevented these two systems from delivering the social principles of equity in provision, equal opportunities for all, universal coverage, accessibility and affordability. Healthcare and education lack oversight and evaluation mechanisms on the demand side to ensure quality of service for its users. Also, there are no cost containment/efficiency mechanisms on the procurement side to avoid a waste of the taxpayers’ money and valuable resources. This means that Greece has high cost/low outcome education and health systems. When the economic crisis struck, the ability of these two systems to deliver the above mentioned social objectives further deteriorated, as lower per capita spending on education, health and social protection lowered entitlements, benefits, outcomes and increased the burden of out of pocket expenses, user charges etc. We conclude by arguing that there is a need for a radical change in the institutional framework and governance of these two systems, by establishing truly independent from the government regulators or agencies (answerable to the parliament alone) that can effectively exercise oversight on both the demand as well as on the purchasing/procurement side of health and education.
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Social, Economic, and Political Determinants of Child Health

Social, Economic, and Political Determinants of Child Health

IMPLICATIONS FOR PEDIATRICIANS Pediatricians must develop an awareness and un- derstanding of the social determinants of health if they are to contribute fully to improved child health outcomes. These determinants have been forgotten in medical education and understated in the contem- porary climate of biomedical and technologic re- sponses to child illness. I am not suggesting that we should abandon biomedical and technologic ad- vances. However, we need to see health within its social context to understand the impact of social factors on children and on their access and response to biomedical and technologic advances in treatment. It also is important that pediatricians be aware of the life course implications of early childhood effects of adverse social circumstances and how these stretch into adult life. Addressing chronic illness in
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IMPACT OF GLOBALIZATION ON SOCIAL SCIENCES EDUCATION IN  SECONDARY SCHOOLS

IMPACT OF GLOBALIZATION ON SOCIAL SCIENCES EDUCATION IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS

community to a “virtual” community. UNESCO - Commission on the development of education (1972) rightly, observes in its memorable report, learning to be “Rigid distinction between different types of teaching, general, scientific, technical and professional must be dropped and education as from primary and secondary levels must become theoretical, technological, practical etc. the same time”. In this sense education is not narrowly conceived particularly which relates to nation, now a days it needs to conductive globally because of impact of globalization. Globalisation processes have linked education to technological and economic development. The culture of globalization has equally engendered the Millennium Development Goals strategies (MDGs), which seek to address issues of poverty, education, equality, wealth and environment and the Education For All Goals to be achieved by year 2015 (Obomanu & Adaramola, 2011). In view of these, globalization has deeply affected social sciences education in schools since social sciences are regarded as the peak for decision making and development of social competencies. With the discovery of computer and internet which make globalization possible, the nature of teaching and learning is changing from traditional learning to electronic learning method. The change from teacher- centered to learner-centered has created a close connection between knowledge construction and reflective action among students and the need to embrace information technologies. Education and training need to keep up with the emergence of new technologies and techniques.
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Social Determinants of Health How Social and Economic Factors Affect Health

Social Determinants of Health How Social and Economic Factors Affect Health

With early prenatal care, this young mother knew to avoid secondhand smoke – but there was less of that around these days because smoking rates have decreased markedly in part due to a new ordinance banning smoking in multi-unit dwellings. She also ate well during her pregnancy. Her main meal of the day was at the cafeteria at the public university where she is a part-time student (her legislators have reallocated the state budget to increase funding for higher education, having been convinced that education increased healthy years of life and decreased utilization of medical care) and it serves fresh fruits and vegetables and non-processed foods. Fast-food restaurants have even been eliminated from the campus. Although she still enjoys fast food at the restaurant where she works part-time, the salt content of these foods has dropped an average of 80 percent throughout the industry, and fried foods have been largely replaced by grilled and baked choices. Public health efforts to educate the food industry and the wider public on the harms of salt have increased public demand for lower-sodium products. In addition to public demand and greater FDA and USDA oversight, board members of the companies that make processed food supported these policies to reduce rising employee health care costs and absenteeism due to hypertension-related illness.
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Social innovation in education: BRAC boat schools in Bangladesh

Social innovation in education: BRAC boat schools in Bangladesh

Mumford (2002) defined social innovations as the creation and usage of new ideas about people and their interactions within a social system. In fact, social innovation ap- pears to represent a particular form of creativity, leading to the formation of new methods and forms of social interaction (Gryskiewicz and Epstein 2000; OECD LEED Forum on Social Innovations 2000).It is assumed to create positive impact on broader parameters like sociological, environmental and economic aspects. Rooted in social challenges and needs, social innovation should be capable of upgrading the social status of an impover- ished community (Nussbaumer and Moulaert 2004). It is further argued as a mechanism of devising innovative solution landscape for a social problem to advance in social issues and demands (Phills et al. 2008). Here, innovation is not only relevant for technology- intensive context, but also operating within a traditional context, which, for instance, rely on services to build their innovative capacity (D'Ippolito and Timpano 2015). Hence, the role of a social entrepreneur as a humanitarian agency and a social innovator has been greatly emphasized in the literature (Bacq and Janssen 2011; Nicholls 2010). However, so- cial innovation gets its momentum through the process of institutionalization of innovation. Institutions are aiding to facilitate and diffuse practices of a particular social innovation in dispersed communities (Mulgan et al. 2007).
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Personal Development, Health and Physical Education

Personal Development, Health and Physical Education

All rights reserved. No part of the Material may be reproduced in Australia or in any other country by any process, electronic or otherwise, in any material form or transmitted to any other person or stored electronically in any form without the prior written permission of the Board of Studies NSW, except as permitted by the Copyright Act 1968. School students in NSW and teachers in schools in NSW may copy reasonable portions of the Material for the purposes of bona fide research or study.

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