Top PDF Politics and Media Among Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Politics and Media Among Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Politics and Media Among Deaf and Hard of Hearing

with the pathological model, encouraging deaf individuals to assimilate into the hearing world (Foss, 2014). The CI technology has become more popular since 2010 (Mauldin, 2012). This has led to the misrepresentation of CIs in media, displaying them as a cure for DHH individuals (Foss, 2014). There are almost no communication studies on hearing aids; much of the emphasis has been placed on profoundly deaf individuals and CIs. Hearing aids require that the user have some or partial hearing. No surgery is required–only a fitting ear mold and an appropriate hearing aid model, adjusted by the wearer’s audiologist. “CIs were seen as a threat to a specific linguistic and cultural tradition and many utilized identity politics and diversity arguments characteristic of other new social movements” (Mauldin, 2012, p. 2). Policy has determined the youngest age an individual can obtain a CI for their child, but policy has not required a language to be taught to DHH individuals. The National Institute of Health (NIH) suggests that children 18 months and older who are deaf obtain a CI to help with learning language and literacy skills (NIH, 2018).
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MEDIA KIT Reach thousands of parents, educators and hearing health care providers in the deaf and hard of hearing community.

MEDIA KIT Reach thousands of parents, educators and hearing health care providers in the deaf and hard of hearing community.

positioning your company as a thought-leader. Using the helpful information your company already has, you can increase your reach to an interested audience of over 60,000 unique visitors each month consisting of families, professionals, and adults with hearing loss within the AG Bell community.

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Accessible Smart Home System for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing using PiCam

Accessible Smart Home System for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing using PiCam

A robot utilizing dog– propelled visual communicational signs to impart expectation is planned by K. L. Koay et al. Robot could lead members to the microwave entryway and front entryway sound source. Head developments and look bearings were essential for conveying the robot's expectation utilizing visual communication signals. Gopinath Shanmuga Sundaram endeavored to fabricate a minimal effort independent device which transmits information utilizing the Raspberry Pi with Bluetooth and has a resistive touch screen show giving a UI. Blunder dealing with systems were utilized to get the exemptions and could retransmit till the affirmation was gotten. Chao-Huang Wei and Shin-A Chenutilized a novel electrical cable communication chip to build up an arranged computerized video entryway telephone framework to supplant the ordinary ones. Entryway Phone is utilized to distinguish visitor or for basic voice interlocution. They exchange varying media data and improve the passageway guarding capacities moreover. Mahdi Safaa A. et al. designed the handheld device for snag discovery utilizing ultrasonic sensor and create voice alarm for visually impaired and vibration caution for deaf individual by keeping his finger on the catch at the highest point of the device. The device is appropriate and simple for daze and deaf with 40-150cm territory and can be
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Captioning for Deaf and Hard of Hearing People by Editing Automatic Speech Recognition in Real Time

Captioning for Deaf and Hard of Hearing People by Editing Automatic Speech Recognition in Real Time

that standard speech recognition software (e.g. Dragon, ViaVoice [18]) was unsuit- able; it required the dictation of punctuation, which does not occur naturally in spontaneous speech in lectures. The international Liberated Learning Collaboration was established by Saint Mary’s University, Nova Scotia, Canada in 1999 and since then the author has continued to work with IBM and Liberated Learning to investi- gate how ASR can make speech more accessible. Further investigations demon- strated the possibility of developing an ASR application that automatically format- ted the transcription by breaking up the continuous stream of text based on the length of silences in the speech to provide a visual indication of pauses. The poten- tial of using ASR to provide automatic captioning of speech in higher education classrooms has now been demonstrated in ‘Liberated Learning’ classrooms in the US, Canada and Australia [4], [15], [33]. Lecturers spend time developing their ASR voice profile by training the ASR software to understand the way they speak. They wear wireless microphones providing the freedom to move around as they are talking, while the text is displayed in real time on a screen using a data projector so students can simultaneously see and hear the lecture as it is delivered. After the lec - ture the text is edited for errors and made available for students on the Internet. To make the Liberated Learning vision a reality, the prototype ASR application, Lec- turer developed in 2000 in collaboration with IBM was superseded the following year by IBM ViaScribe [11], [3]. Both applications used the ViaVoice ASR ‘engine’ and its corresponding training of voice and language models and automatically pro- vided text displayed in a window and stored for later reference synchronised with the speech. ViaScribe created files that enabled synchronised audio and the corre- sponding text transcript and slides to be viewed on an Internet browser or through media players that support the SMIL 2.0 standard [24] for accessible multimedia. ViaScribe can automatically produce a synchronised captioned transcription of spontaneous speech using automatically triggered formatting from live lectures, or in the office, or from recorded speech files on a website.
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Provider Perspectives on Telepractice for Serving Families of Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Provider Perspectives on Telepractice for Serving Families of Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

infrastructure to becoming a method that is now part of mainstream social media technologies. For example, headsets were often required in past years to reduce echoing, yet their infrequent use reported by these providers likely reflects the greatly improved echo canceling algorithms in newer computers and tablets. Providers appear to be getting away from desktop systems and moving to laptops and tablets (particularly iPads) due to their affordability, portability, and ease of use. For example, one provider commented that the iPad allowed the caregiver to position the camera at an angle such that the provider could better view the child's responses when engaged in a therapeutic activity. As a result of these rapid changes in hardware and software platforms, the cost-effectiveness of telepractice will likely increase in relation to the growing cost of travel and provider hours required for traditional in-person visits. This potential cost savings may be persuasive to hesitant
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Standards of Care for Serving Deaf and Hard of Hearing Clients

Standards of Care for Serving Deaf and Hard of Hearing Clients

(2006) guideline regarding materials given to consumers regarding illness and recovery: "Many treatment processes involve 'homework' in the form of reading and writing assignments, in which consumers learn about their illness and steps to enhance recovery. Since most Deaf people do not read or write English fluently, it is advised that this mode of treatment be avoided. Rather, it is recommended that ASL translations of such materials be made available (video), and consumer responses also be recorded in a video format. If films, videos or other media are used as part of the 'normal' treatment process, they MUST be captioned (legal requirement), but again, since reading may be a barrier for many Deaf consumers, an ASL translation (interpreter) may also be required to ensure full comprehension of the material being covered."
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Review of the Smoke Alarm Subsidy Scheme for Deaf and hard of hearing Victorians

Review of the Smoke Alarm Subsidy Scheme for Deaf and hard of hearing Victorians

The answers presented in Figure 2 show that Vicdeaf was the principle source of information about the scheme, but that people heard about it from a wide range of sources. Comments from emails and the focus groups indicate that the MFB and CFA were important sources of information about the scheme, and these may have been where many of the 12 people who chose “other” had received their information. While the launch of the scheme was reported in all mainstream media, it is interesting to note that only one participant recalled first hearing about the scheme in this manner. This suggests that targeted information about the scheme has been much more effective in reaching this client group than publicity in the mass media, yet it is also worth noting that this sample may not be representative of the target population. Those who have responded to the survey in the main have received a letter from Vicdeaf and followed instructions to visit the Vicdeaf website to fill out the survey and thus may be more receptive to communication from Deafness and disability groups than members of the general target population. The survey then went on to ask people how long they waited before applying for an alarm. Figure 2 presents the results, excluding those from people who did not apply.
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Opening doors or creating barriers?: The Influence of interpreters on levels of communication apprehension among deaf and hard-of-hearing students

Opening doors or creating barriers?: The Influence of interpreters on levels of communication apprehension among deaf and hard-of-hearing students

The importance placed on prior history when approaching a communication event makes it possible that one unskilled interpreter or difficult deaf student could color the perception of a professor to all future interactions with interpreters and deaf students. Such a negative experience is an unfortunate but common occurrence of mediated communication since even the most skilled interpreters cannot provide full access to deaf students “[i]f „full access‟ is deemed to mean exiting a course lecture with knowledge equivalent to hearing classmates” (Marschark, Sapere, Convertino, & Seewagen, 2005, p. 46).
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MAKING CONNECTIONS: NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND APPLICATIONS WITH INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

MAKING CONNECTIONS: NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND APPLICATIONS WITH INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

Welcome to the first annual “Making Connections: Neuropsychological Assessment and Applications with Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing” conference website. Hosted by the Gallaudet University Department of Psychology, the conference is created for the purpose of bringing together professionals in the field of deafness and psychology already trained or have a developing interest in neuropsychological

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Determinants of health- related quality of life (HRQoL) among deaf and hard of hearing adults in Greece: a cross-sectional study

Determinants of health- related quality of life (HRQoL) among deaf and hard of hearing adults in Greece: a cross-sectional study

argued that allows the direct comparison of the effects of several determinants including hearing impairment on the health-related quality of life of populations [35]. Moreover, we considered the SF-36v2 sufficient as it has been translated and its psychometric properties have been tested for a Greek population [18], while the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Adults (HHIA) has not. Another limitation was that the deaf population consists of subgroups with different cultural and communicational characteristics, which need to be sep- arately examined. In this study, the five designed sub- categories of population with hearing loss were not used as independent variables. The reason was the ex- ceptionally small number of participants in several cat- egories (n ≤ 10). As a result, the classification was limited to the three bigger categories (deaf/ hard of hearing/hearing) and it was not possible to take into consideration the language preferences of the partici- pants, but only their cultural self-identification. This should be considered by future studies aiming to assess the health-related quality of life in a larger sample of population with hearing loss, as e.g. the Deaf commu- nity struggles with a number of socioeconomic-based health disparities, many of which are not directly asso- ciated with the degree of hearing loss.
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Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit information for deaf and hard of hearing people

Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit information for deaf and hard of hearing people

The RNID Information Line offers a wide range of information on many aspects of deafness and hearing loss. You can contact us for further copies of this factsheet and the full range of our information factsheets and leaflets. Alternatively, fill in the Want to know more? order form at the end of this factsheet and return it to RNID.

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The use of music education in oral schools for children who are deaf and hard of hearing

The use of music education in oral schools for children who are deaf and hard of hearing

The social skills that children who are deaf and hard of hearing develop through music participation can benefit them greatly while they are students in private oral schools. But perhaps more significant is the impact that this skill development can have once students leave these schools and enter mainstream educational settings. Several survey respondents observed that shared musical experiences helped children who are deaf and hard of hearing interact more positively with their hearing peers. Music activities allow children of all developmental and hearing levels to bond over shared experiences; children can learn from a very early age to see past their differences and unite themselves by enjoying the same things. Group participation in music activities in the mainstream setting can help children who are deaf and hard of hearing feel more like a part of the community.
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Synchronous Online Tutoring for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students: An Analysis of Observed Functions

Synchronous Online Tutoring for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students: An Analysis of Observed Functions

Revised Model Instruction : Interactions, Materials Support : Interactions Social & Informal Exchange : Interactions Extended Outreach Collaboration : Interaction, Materials, Tech[r]

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Video Relay Service: E911 Solution for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing VRS Users

Video Relay Service: E911 Solution for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing VRS Users

communicate with hearing callers. To place a call, the VRS user first connects to a Snap!VRS interpreter. The interpreter then bridges the call from the user to the hearing party and acts as an intermediary, translating between spoken word and ASL.

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Oral Health Condition in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children in West−Pomeranian Region

Oral Health Condition in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children in West−Pomeranian Region

Material and Methods. A group of 109 hearing impaired children from West−−Pomeranian Region, aged 7 to 15, of both sexes, participated in this study. The randomized control group was also made. The assessed indices were: caries frequency, dft and DMFT value with proper components and dental treatment index for primary and perma− nent dentition. Condition of periodontium (CPI index), oral hygiene (Pl.I. by Silness and Löe), frequency of ma− locclusions and the presence of fissure sealants were also estimated.

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The Structure of Intelligence of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children: A Factor Analysis of the WISC-IV.

The Structure of Intelligence of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children: A Factor Analysis of the WISC-IV.

However, medical diagnoses can differ from functional diagnoses. Whereas medical diagnoses revolve around numbers (e.g., PTA) and specific anatomical abnormalities, functional diagnoses of deaf or hard-of-hearing are established on the ability to acquire and use oral language. In a functional sense, the distinction between deaf and hard-of-hearing is the ability to comprehend and produce oral speech (with or without amplification) (J.P. Braden, personal communication, September 11, 2006). Hard-of-hearing individuals can generally respond to speech and other auditory stimuli, whereas deaf individuals usually cannot understand speech or other sounds (National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2004). There is an imperfect relationship between medical and functional definitions of hearing loss. For example, an individual with a hearing loss of 80 dB is medically diagnosed as deaf; however, with the use of hearing aids the individual is able to primarily communicate through speech, functionally falling within the hard-of-hearing classification.
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College students' perceptions of the characteristics of effective teachers of deaf and hard-of-hearing students

College students' perceptions of the characteristics of effective teachers of deaf and hard-of-hearing students

Research Question: The main question being addressed through this thesis research is "What are the qualities and characteristics of effective teachers of deaf students?" This study will [r]

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How Deaf and Hard of Hearing Adults are affected by the Current State of Real Estate

How Deaf and Hard of Hearing Adults are affected by the Current State of Real Estate

That statement shows that while it was a personal preference to not own a home and it shows that they were not ready to settle down. They are interesting in buying a home when they are settled in a town that they love and want to be in. It is not a factor of lack of knowledge but it was a more personal factor. Another surprising thing that came out of the questionnaire was that a majority of the hearing realtors were aware that their clientele was DHOH and they were aware of the different ways to communicate with them in the ways that the realtor thought would ensure comfort and smooth communication. One interviewee was proud to say that his realtor was proficient in ASL. This was somewhat intriguing because it made me wonder, how many of his clients were DHOH. Did he learn sign language for DHOH population or for another
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Experiences of Teachers of Deaf and Hard- of- Hearing Students’ in a Special Needs School: An Exploratory Study

Experiences of Teachers of Deaf and Hard- of- Hearing Students’ in a Special Needs School: An Exploratory Study

), the Education for All Policy (2010) and the Draft Inclusive Education Policy (2005; 2008). The implementation of the Education for All Policy (2010) spearheaded the introduction of inclusive education in mainstream schools. Therefore, all teachers in the country’s schools are expected to be competent to teach learners with a wide range of educational needs including deaf and hard-of- hearing. There is an effort by the government of kingdom of Eswatini to promote education as a basic human right through ensuring that males and females receive equal treatment and benefits at all levels (MoET, 2011; MoET, 2012). However, the assimilation of students with disabilities into the mainstream schools of the education system has not been fully realised despite the effort to explicitly define and explain inclusive education in the policy frameworks by the government of the kingdom of Eswatini (Draft Inclusive Education Policy, 2005; 2008). For instance, most students who are deaf and hard- of- hearing attend special needs schools in the country.
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Identifying C-Print as a support service for rural, mainstreamed deaf/hard of hearing students

Identifying C-Print as a support service for rural, mainstreamed deaf/hard of hearing students

C-Print is being used nationally as a support service option for mainstreamed deaf/hard of hearing students, but it appears there is a lack of information being issued in rural areas where educational personnel may lack familiarity with and knowledge regarding C-Print as a support service. Some barriers that can cause this shortfall in the rural areas of education are geographic barriers, lack of professional development activities, and lack of available technology and the training and assistance with such technology (Henderson, Kyger, Guarino-Murphey, 1998; Williams, Martin, Hess, 2002). It is necessary for educators, supervisors, Committee on Special Education (CSE) chairpersons, students, and parents to become familiar with all of the support services that are available for deaf/hard of hearing students in order to put these students on the same playing field as their hearing peers. Once knowledgeable about C-Print personnel in mainstreamed educational settings can begin to have an interest in C-Print, do more research analysis to obtain additional information to determine if C-Print is a viable option, and implement this option for some or all of their students who are deaf/hard of hearing.
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