Top PDF Post 18 choice of part-time study. May 2019

Post 18 choice of part-time study. May 2019

Post 18 choice of part-time study. May 2019

The scale of this difference would suggest the figures should be treated with caution. As outlined in Section 2.2.2, survey data are subject to measurement and sampling error: it is possible that the notion of ‘considering studying’ had a different meaning for the research team and for respondents. In addition, there is a risk that the sample used for this survey might not be entirely representative of the wider British population. In particular, it is not a stretch to consider that people who have the time or inclination to take part in opt-in panel surveys may also be the types of people more likely to consider or enter post-18 education. However, the target population for this study is larger than that covered by the HESA statistics, including those studying outside HEIs, and people who have started studying within the last five years rather than those who are studying in a particular year. It is therefore possible that the true figure is genuinely much larger, and so this estimate should not be discounted.
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International comparisons of post-compulsory education systems. Final report, May 2019

International comparisons of post-compulsory education systems. Final report, May 2019

The current legal framework for public provision discourages part time study because public institutions are, by law, obliged to provide only complete educational programmes, so they cannot offer and give credit for individual modules of programmes. In addition, adult students typically work during their studies, creating an opportunity to link studies and workplace practice but public hogescholen face regulatory constraints on the total amount of learning taking place outside the institution. Against this background, many adults who wish to study part-time, and who can afford the fees (or have their fees paid for them) prefer the private sector since course length can vary and it is possible to obtain only some credits in one semester and the rest of the programme later on.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7966, 18 January 2019: Part-time undergraduate students in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number CBP 7966, 18 January 2019: Part-time undergraduate students in England

Entry to part-time study appears to be pro-cyclical: increasing in good economic times and reducing during and after a recession. Figure 13 shows public sector employment and part-time higher education study tracking each other in recent years. A partial explanation may be that decreasing employment in the public sector leads to fewer people able to access employer funding for study, as well as reduction in employers’ training budgets. 45

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The wider (non-market) benefits of post 18 education for individuals and society. May 2019

The wider (non-market) benefits of post 18 education for individuals and society. May 2019

Jenkins and Mostafa (2012) investigated the impact of formal and informal learning on the wellbeing of older adults aged 50 to 69 using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). After controlling for other factors using panel regression models (and therefore attempting to isolate the causal effect of learning) as well as marital and work status, informal learning such as gym and exercise classes and arts, music and evening classes were found to be significantly related to improvements in wellbeing, as measured by CASP-19 quality of life scores. While obtaining a qualification was also found to be significantly related to increased wellbeing, formal learning without a qualification was not. The associated rise in wellbeing was estimated to be roughly equivalent to a move from the bottom to middle quintile of the wealth distribution, or equivalent to one-sixth of the wellbeing of being in 'fair' as opposed to 'poor' health, and was large enough to offset the decline in wellbeing associated with ageing or unemployment. The analysis was carried out using a nationally representative sample covering four waves of the ELSA from 2002 to 2009.
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Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

Abstract. This study examined the effectiveness of using the Visual Vocabulary app as a metacognitive strategy for learning English as a Foreign Language (EFL) vocabulary. The participants included 42 EFL pre-service teachers aged 18 - 25 years old, who had an A1+ Common European Framework of References (CEFR) proficiency level and were enrolled in the second semester of an English program at a private university in Loja, Ecuador. These students were divided into experimental (20) and control group (22) by using purposeful sampling. Additionally, two teachers, who were in charge of planning and applying the activities in the classroom, participated in this study. A quasi-experimental approach was used, in which pre and post-tests, questionnaires and teacher’s interviews were applied to the participants. In the experimental group, students employed the Visual Vocabulary app as a didactic resource twice a week to increase their lexical knowledge, which allowed them to have control over their own thinking and decisions related to the development of learning activities. As for the control group, they received the same time of instruction but they did not use the app in their classes; instead, they worked on regular classroom activities. The results indicate that the Visual Vocabulary app was effective as a metacognitive strategy to enhance EFL vocabulary learning, and students showed a positive attitude towards the use of this tool. Furthermore, this app was a motivating tool for vocabulary learning, being useful for providing immediate feedback and helping students build their confidence to develop their language skills.
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Vol 18, No 13 (2019)

Vol 18, No 13 (2019)

and experiences to learning situations. Various psychological processes play key roles in how we try to achieve our goals. In this study, we focus on what kind of capabilities university students have in terms of regulating their own learning processes and how they are related to their learning achievements in a learning environment which utilizes the FC approach. The theoretical background in terms of self-regulation in this study is generally based on Zimmermann’s (2005) self-regulated learning (SRL) theory, in which students’ regulation of learning is considered to flow through three phases: forethought, performance and self- reflection phase. Self-regulated learning skills are considered to be important 21st century skills which support lifelong learning. The development of pedagogical approaches and, more generally, learning environments requires teachers to change their habits and practices of teaching, but more importantly, it also requires students to change their ways of learning. This study focuses on that. As we aimed at changing teaching-learning environments with the Flipped Classroom or Flipped Learning approach towards supporting more student- centered or learner-centered learning, we also reduced teacher regulation of the teaching-learning situations. As teacher regulation decreases, it gives the students a possibility to increase the regulation of their own learning at the same time (e.g. Toivola, 2016; Toivola & Silfverberg, 2015). Therefore, it is essential to investigate students’ self-regulated learning skills in relation to achievement on courses that follow the Flipped Classroom approach.
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Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

The first question in this study sought to determine the cost of tuition fees charged per hour for EGP. The current study found that the majority (37:2%) of the tutors charge between 11000 and 15000 Chilean pesos. This group is followed by (26%) of tutors who charge between 6000 and 10000 Chilean pesos. Since there is no prior cost survey of EGP in other EFL contexts, it is difficult to compare the service fee in Chile with other countries. However, the differences in the fee ranges might have been influenced by different factors such as frequent lessons, teachers’ quality and geographical location (Hamid et al., 2009) The second objective of the study was to identify the volume of English Private Tutoring (EPT) services’ adverts in different regions of Chile. The result indicates that tutor list websites such as yapo.cl have more EPT service adverts from different regions of Chile than in Santiago, which is the capital city of the country. On the other hand, tuparticulares has more adverts from tutors residing in Santiago than those living in the other regions of Chile. Though previous findings have not been consistent in this regard. However, this is the first study to compare the availability of services in different locations on two different tutor listing websites. A possible explanation for these results may be because yapo is a Chilean company which is known for advertising all goods and services. Thus, it is more popular all over Chile, while tuparticulares as an international tutor listing website is more popular in an international city such as Santiago. Based on the consumer's location, these findings have a crucial implication in tutors’ and consumers’ decision making concerning the choice of tutor listing websites for advertising their service.
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International comparisons of post-compulsory education systems. Final report, May 2019

International comparisons of post-compulsory education systems. Final report, May 2019

performance of the sector. The reported PIs allow for the evaluation of performance of students by level of course and hours of study both over time and against other similar colleges. The annual Performance Indicators report provides a broad coverage of activity and includes in addition to SFC funded student activity, Skills Development Scotland (SDS) employability fund and college-based university ‘Associate’ status students. The PIs are based on student records submitted via the Further Education Statistics (FES) system. This is an automated data capture and record system which encompasses built-in iterative quality checks to ensure the data is correct and credible. In addition, every college Principal must also sign-off the data as a true and accurate record for their college. As an additional reassurance of consistency and quality, SFC has a contract with Education Scotland to perform external quality reviews of college performance. QAA Scotland has devolved responsibility for the work of the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) in Scotland. Their work is informed by the Quality Enhancement Framework (QEF) which has been in place since 2003 and continues to develop under the guidance of the
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Vol 18 (2019)

Vol 18 (2019)

once daily compound vericiguat was chosen due to its optimized pharmacokinetic profile. Vericiguat was investigated in two phase IIb studies in HFrEF (SOCRATES -REDUCED) and HFpEF (SOCRATES-PRESERVED), in which patients were included during a hospitalization for acute HF, and the end-point was a decrease in circulating natriuretic peptides. The SOCRATES- PRESERVED randomized HFpEF patients (LVEF≥ 45%) into 5 parallel dose arms or placebo for 12 weeks to characterize safety, tolerability, and pharmacologic effects. The study was negative in its primary outcomes of decreasing levels of natriuretic peptides or reducing left atrial volume.[31] The SOCRATES-REDUCED showed a statistically positive effect on NT-proBNP only with the highest doses in secondary analysis[32], and the agent is currently being tested in a phase III study for HFrEF, the ongoing VICTORIA trial[33], with the primary hypothesis that vericiguat is superior to placebo in increasing the time to first occurrence of the composite of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization in a planned 4,872 participants with HFrEF with results expected in 2020. The VITALITY-HFpEF trial plans to assess whether treatment with vericiguat 10 mg or 15 mg in patients with HFpEF improves the KCCQ PLS (Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire Physical limitation score) compared to placebo after 24 weeks of treatment in a planned 735 participants, with results also expected in 2020.[34]
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Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

In turn 1, TL12 asks a question which is followed by a three-second silence: a duration which is usually enough for self-selection by other interlocutors in an interaction. However, since none of the JLs takes up the turn and volunteers for an answer, JT initiates a repair-driven paraphrase in turn 2 characterized by the emphatic pronunciation of the word “BESIDES” aiming to correct the use of the word “beside” by TL12. This repair, however, is provided in passing and remains unnoticed by TL12 who quickly starts another turn (notice the latching sign) elaborating on his previously asked question. The unfolding of the following turns also reveals that JT’s intention in turn 2 was to paraphrase TL12’s question for communication purposes since the repair was attended to neither by the learners nor the teachers later on. This could potentially create a space for JLs to gain the floor, but as mentioned before, TL12’s latching turn that follows this paraphrase limits this space. Throughout turns 3 to 10 and in a post-expansion sequence the interactants make brief jokes about the idea of playing after drinking until turn 11 where JT, once again, provides a delayed communication- driven paraphrase for TL12’s question in turn 1. At this moment one of the Japanese learners (JL8) sitting at the back of the class utters a filler sound (e::h) with a prolonged vowel indicating her self-selection for the next turn. She then steps towards the front of the class where the screen, the camera, and the microphone are located. In turn 13, JL8 starts her relatively long response to the question and the paraphrased question, which continues towards the end of the sequence with minimal interruptions by JT. The only question asked by JT occurs in turn 16, which is a short form for the RQ “do you mean billiard?” as a response to JL8’s request for help in turn 15. This question is asked at a time when the previous turn has come to a prosodic, syntactic and semantic end and hence a transition relevance point (TRP) has emerged. For this reason, JL8’s flow of talk is not interrupted, and she continues until she brings her turn to a close. 3.1.2. Follow-ups to RQs
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Vol 18, No 13 (2019)

Vol 18, No 13 (2019)

There is also already quite much existing research about the FC approach and students’ experiences. For example, according to Wanner and Palmer (2015), university students experienced FC as flexible and they were able to search for their own ways of learning, however, students also thought that it is important to have a clear structure in a FC course. For example, students experience that being able to work and learn at their own pace and time is seen as useful (Gilboy, Heinerichs, & Pazzaglia, 2015; Ng, 2016; Nouri, 2016). Also, Mortensen and Nicholson (2015) found that students experienced FC as enjoyable, whereas O’Flaherty and Phillips (2015) reported an increase in student satisfaction. However, there is evidence that students’ approaches to learning affect their experiences of a teaching-learning environment (e.g., Parpala, Lindblom-Ylänne, Komulainen, Litmanen, & Hirsto, 2012). Entwistle, McCune & Hounsell (2002) have developed an approach through which general key elements of a learning environments that may support deep learning can be investigated. According to their measurement tool, they have identified six key elements within that: teaching aiming for understanding, staff enthusiasm and support, interest and relevance, support from other students, constructive feedback and constructive alignment. This approach by Entwistle et al. (2002) was taken into use in Study 1, and Study 2 used a more open approach to elicit students’ actual experiences in relation to their self-regulation through interviews.
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Graduate choices in post-education jobs and careers : a literature review, May 2019

Graduate choices in post-education jobs and careers : a literature review, May 2019

Looking at the extent to which jobs are part of their long-term career plans, the most recent Longitudinal Destination of Leavers of Higher Education (L-DLHE) survey found that this percentage increased over time (from 20% six months after graduation to 36% 2.5 years after completing the degree). Evidence from the Futuretrack study also shows that graduates are still settling into their careers 1-2 years after graduation. The highest percentage of those who got exactly the job they wanted had studied medicine and dentistry (87%) followed by subjects allied to medicine (71%), education and engineering (both 58%). A survey of creative graduates undertaken 4-6 years after graduation found that 79% reported that they either work in their chosen career or in an area that is very or fairly close to it. This figure seems relatively high compared to the others and may be due to the fact the graduates have settled into their careers prior to the 2008 recession and were surveyed later on in their career.
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Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

This study followed a quantitative research approach. Descriptive statistics were utilized via Statistical Packages for Social Sciences (SPSS 15.0). To answer the first research question, the means and standard deviations were calculated for the parts of the literacy and numeracy tests, as well as for the tests in their entirety. A comparison was made between the mean scores of the responses on the two tests to determine the skill levels that the participants attained. To answer the second research question, which asks if literacy skills correlate with numeracy skills among students, a Pearson correlation analysis was utilized. An analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was also utilized in order to examine whether there were statistically significant differences between the mean scores of the literacy and numeracy skills related to the effects of gender, pre-school knowledge, and parents’ educational level. In addition, a Tukey post hoc test was utilized for multiple comparisons based on parents’ educational level.
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MoL 2019 11: 
  Meaning through Time: A Diachronic and Semantic Study of Italian Free Choice

MoL 2019 11: Meaning through Time: A Diachronic and Semantic Study of Italian Free Choice

One of the main challenges is, of course, to determine the exact FPs which pertain to this layer. In this regard, we believe that an integration between semantics and syntax may provide some useful insights. Unfortunately, much of the semantic work starting from the work initiated by Montague ( 1970 ) adopted syntactic constraints which are somehow incompatible with current syntactic theories (e.g. strong adherence to the surface structure and general dislike for movement, non-constrained syntactic structure in favour of strong compositionality, . . . ). As Zamparelli ( 2005 ) notes, the price to pay for such assumptions is quite high: invisible semantic operators, which would perhaps correspond to phonologically null heads in a more refined syntactic structure, need to be postulated and semantic rules become very complex. A possible trade-off is to look at the syntax-semantics interface and assume a correspondence between functional projections and meanings/denotations. In this way, compositionality may be integrated in an empirically adequate syntactic structure.
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Vol 18, No 13 (2019)

Vol 18, No 13 (2019)

The findings of this study emphasize the importance of the teacher’s role, as the teachers’ actions exerted an influence on students’ positive experience with regard to each of the studied learning environment dimensions during the FC courses. The elements that most influenced students’ positive experience— guidance received in the FC study method, teaching aimed at understanding, the teacher’s pedagogical content knowledge, the creation and maintenance of a safe atmosphere for learning, support from peers and teachers, and students’ views on technology usage—are all strongly connected to the teacher’s knowledge, choices, and actions. Moreover, most of the students urged that students should be at the center of the teaching and learning situation in a good learning environment. This student-centered perspective also relates to the teacher's methodological choices. Bingham (2011) emphasizes the teacher’s role in organizing conditions conducive to teaching and learning while expressing concerns over teachers’ decreasing future importance in a world where a vast amount of online material is available and can be accessed anywhere, at any time. Overall, our findings strengthen the importance of the teacher in facilitating learning and the promotion of positive learning experiences. Perhaps a solution for the development of higher education could involve “collecting the cherries of the cake for learning”, that is, combining the best parts of online teaching and face-to-face teaching with thoughtfully sequenced teaching for learning, as is enabled by FC. In the FC approach, this means time and location flexibility for students and the fact that they are better prepared for contact meetings. In the contact meetings, teachers can be pedagogical experts by creating a safe atmosphere for students and content experts by exposing their knowledge for students to use, as students have engaged with pre-materials to better prepare themselves for learning. This all requires pedagogical expertise, as does offering students guidance and counseling in the teaching approach, which is of paramount importance for promoting learning satisfaction. This can also influence the content learning and afford students opportunities to learn the 21 st century skills. Given these findings, it seems that attention should be further
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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8577: 30 May 2019: The Post-18 Education Review (the Augar Review)
recommendations

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8577: 30 May 2019: The Post-18 Education Review (the Augar Review) recommendations

The principal cause of unpaid loans is that many graduates earn too little in the course of their employment to repay the loan in full under existing terms. The analysis of graduate earnings at age 29 outlined above shows that a significant minority of graduates, concentrated in some institutions and some subjects, as well as among those with low educational attainment on embarking on degree study, are likely to earn too little to repay any or more than a small part of their loan; they would have been better off

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Vol 18, No 13 (2019)

Vol 18, No 13 (2019)

Since the goal was to create a flexible digital environment, the first task in designing the learning solution was to select suitable tools for implementing the pedagogical ideas. The first question was whether the environment should be open or closed. Since the funder, The Ministry of Education and Culture, requires open access solutions, and also because the aim was to create easily accessible materials, an open solution was selected. The internet provides unique opportunities for higher education. Massive open online courses (MOOCs), meaning courses that are open to all who are willing to study, as well as learning management systems (LMSs), i.e. software applications for managing educational courses, have emerged, providing educational resources for students regardless of their physical location. The development costs of quality online educational materials can be high; however, those are fixed one-time costs, and, as the maintenance and redistribution of the created content is cheap compared to contact teaching, this allows the universities to use the solution for a long time. Since the universities in Finland operate mainly on public funding, the costs for each university to develop and maintain the environment needed to be low. Thus, mainly such software were selected that already were used by all universities or that were free or low in cost. The domain name unips.fi was reserved for the platform and a web hotel was rented to host the site. The WordPress content management system (CMS) was then installed on the server, on top of which the main UNIPS website and all pedagogical materials were deployed. According to design science research approaches, such as the Hevner design science (Hevner, 2007), information to the artifact must be obtained both from a knowledge base (scientific articles) as well as the environment (UTUPS prototype). The UNIPS artifact went through several iterations where both the website visuals and order of materials were improved upon. In autumn 2017, three pilot modules, each worth one credit point, were offered to staff members and doctoral students at the University of Turku. At the same time the website was made accessible with no password to make the materials available for everyone. Since 2017, all UNIPS content has been licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution–ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) license. The design of the website and the technical background solution was designed together with participating universities. The coordinating university, the University of Turku, was the administrator in executing the solution. However, each university was responsible for developing their own materials on the module website.
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Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

Abstract. The reduced engagement of students in large classes is one concern that may have an impact on the low level of students' academic achievement. The use of a digital game is one proven teaching media that increase students’ engagement in learning. This research seeks to compare the effectiveness of using digital games towards students' academic achievement in small and large classes. This quasi- experimental research uses a pretest-posttest nonequivalent multiple group design involving 58 pre-service physics teachers in two classes, namely small class and large class. Both classes use the same digital game application to study the nature of light. Data were collected through a paper and pencil test consisting of multiple-choice questions. The result showed that the use of a digital game could increase students' academic achievement. The students’ game score achievement and the increase in academic achievement were positively correlated. The use of a digital game in large classes can significantly increase students' academic achievement compared to small classes.
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Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

However, parents did not mention learning technology as a reason for promoting bilingualism. The findings also revealed that parents are motivated to become involved in their children’s bilingual development. Based on their self- reports, they claimed to promote bilingualism through strategies such as reading together. However, the findings showed that the second-most common method parents use to promote bilingualism was by talking to their children in English. This method is not suggested as an effective way to improve the language knowledge and skills of young children. Parents should speak to their children in their native language, in this case, Arabic, since the parents are the major source for children to gain the greatest language competencies in L1. By talking to them in L2, parents are unwittingly depriving their children of a valuable source for acquiring L1 skills, as advocated by Paradis, Genesee, and Crago (2010). The last technique that parents mentioned they used was computer games. As it is known, computer games are an inescapable phenomenon of modern childhood which has become part of children’s daily lives. Thus, it is not surprising that parents would also use them as a tool for promoting bilingualism.
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Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

Vol 18, No 12 (2019)

Conversely, John (2006) and Rozelle and Wilson (2012) found that some English teachers still face difficulties in developing effective and systematic lesson plans. This finding ties well during the focus group interview conducted as a part of this study with the participants who stated that even if they know the main parts of a lesson plan, they have still difficulties in constructing the subparts of each main part (focus group interview, August 10, 2018). Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the structure of the lesson plans produced by the student-teachers during the Teaching Internship course through move confirmation and teaching strategy identification, which is inspired by Swales’ (1990) move analysis. This analysis involves identifying the series of moves that make up the genre from a representative sample of texts. Each move is a distinctive communicative act that is aimed to attain one communicative function and can be subdivided into different steps or rhetorical strategies (Hyland, 2000). The steps or strategies of a move primarily function to achieve the purpose of the move to which it belongs (Biber, Conner & Upton, 2007). In this investigation, the moves are the main parts of the lesson plan, and their constituent subparts are considered as teaching strategies. While many genre researchers (Peacock, 2002, 2011; Samraj, 2002; Yang & Allison, 2003; Lores, 2004; Kanoksilapatham, 2005; Lim, 2006; Ozturk, 2007; Li & Ge, 2009; Huang & He, 2011; Zhang, Thuc & Pramoolsook, 2012; Basturkmen, 2012; Jaroongkhongdach, Todd, Keyuravong & Hall, 2012; Stoller & Robinson, 2013; Nguyen & Pramoolsook, 2014, 2015; Shulzhe, 2016) have examined the rhetorical structures of theses, dissertations, research articles and other academic texts across disciplines following the perspective of move analysis, however, as yet, no research studies have been conducted on investigating the structure of lesson plans. The present study, therefore, attempted to contribute a piece of new knowledge to genre studies and a new methodological effort for genre-based analysis by exploring the lesson plans within the discipline of Bachelor of Secondary Education (BSED)-English. Specifically, it explored the moves to confirm whether the student writers followed the five parts prescribed by CHED, and it also identified the constituent teaching strategies used to achieve these parts. The objective of this study, therefore, translates into these two research questions:
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