Top PDF Post-18 education and funding : options for the government review

Post-18 education and funding : options for the government review

Post-18 education and funding : options for the government review

The strongest criticism of the proposal concerns whether those who would be affected really do see little to no income boost from bachelor’s degree study. While their returns are certainly lower than those with higher levels of prior attainment, the crucial question concerns the counterfactual: would they be better off pursuing a training or education pathway other than bachelor’s degree study? The evidence base here is still far from concrete, though recent research from the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) shines some light on this question. Whilst it does not distinguish between bachelor and sub-bachelor level study, it shows that relative to non-entrants, male higher education entrants in the bottom third of GCSE attainment without a STEM A level saw earnings at age 29 that were just 4 per cent higher. This compares to 8 and 20 per cent for entrants in the middle and top third of GCSE attainment respectively. 12 For women with the same academic background, earnings were 23 per
Show more

65 Read more

Speech: PM: The right education for everyone : Prime Minister, Theresa May, speaks at Derby College as she launches a review of post-18 education and funding. 19 February 2018

Speech: PM: The right education for everyone : Prime Minister, Theresa May, speaks at Derby College as she launches a review of post-18 education and funding. 19 February 2018

This review will now identify how we can help young people make more effective choices between these different options. That could include giving young people better guidance about the earning potential of different jobs and what different qualifications are needed to get them, so they can make more informed decisions about their futures.

11 Read more

Higher Education funding in England: past, present and options for the future: IFS Briefing Note BN211

Higher Education funding in England: past, present and options for the future: IFS Briefing Note BN211

Note: All figures are given in 2017 prices, in net present value terms using the government discount rate of RPI + 0.7%. These figures apply to young full-time English-domiciled students studying at the 90 largest universities in England starting in 2017–18. Cohort of students is held constant across systems. We assume that all students taking out loans do so for the full amount to which they are entitled, that there is no dropout from university, that graduates repay according to the repayment schedule and that they have low unearned income. This assumes cohort size of 365,700 based on 2015–16 Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) estimates of English-domiciled first-year full-time undergraduates. We assume 10% non-take-up of loans, approximately in line with Student Loans Company (SLC) data on loan uptake. * When originally published this number did not include the £75m in grants for non-borrowers, this has since been added.
Show more

42 Read more

The Independent Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

The Independent Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

Other data provided by DEL and UCAS shows that the number of students enrolled in NI HEI‟s increased between 2008 and 2009 from 18,072 to 19,292 (an increase of 7%). Whilst the introduction of variables fees appears to have had a limited impact on the enrolment of students, it does appear to have affected the expectations of students. The Stuart Review quotes figures from the NUS Student Experience which found that 75% of students say they are enjoying their University experience. On average, 8.5% of students said they were not enjoying their University experience with the highest negative response (10%) from Post 1992 and Other Institutions students. It should be noted that the survey had 2,407 responses to this question with 169 from Other Institutions and 1,021 from Post 1992 HEI‟s (the highest number of responses) 15 .
Show more

12 Read more

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8577: 30 May 2019: The Post-18 Education Review (the Augar Review)
recommendations

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 8577: 30 May 2019: The Post-18 Education Review (the Augar Review) recommendations

Few jobs will be unchanged from technology and very few people will be able to thrive without frequent opportunities to learn, train and pick up new skills. Focusing only on universities and tuition fees does not do justice to those challenges, nor recognise the opportunities we have as a country if we get this right. The Post-18 Review report attempts to balance the needs, aspirations and opportunities for every adult and proposes meaningful changes across universities, colleges and skills which are vital to set the country up for the future – including welcome recognition for the vital role of further education colleges, a boost to intermediate level skills funding and new rights for all adults to be able to get the support they need to progress in learning. We need a diverse and thriving post-18 education sector, led by universities and colleges, working closely with employers and communities. The post-18 review report helps us start building that system and supporting everyone throughout their lives.” 21
Show more

32 Read more

Post study work visa options : an international comparative review

Post study work visa options : an international comparative review

As follows from the above, while international students’ motivations to choose given destinations are to some extent shaped by the scope of action created by government policies and the policies of higher education institutions (henceforth HEIs), there is a whole host of other factors prospective students take into consideration. Some of these are related to the home country, such as demand vs. supply of tertiary education courses (e.g. in China demand outstrips supply which motivates many Chinese young people to study abroad) or type and scale of sponsorship programmes available. Moreover, some of these factors are unpredictable, such as currency fluctuations and changes in exchange rates, hence their impact on student choice may change over time. For example, New Zealand, a highly popular and established student destination, experienced a considerable drop in international student numbers as the exchange rate between the New Zealand dollar and the US dollar changed. As the value of the New Zealand dollar increased in 2006, the number of international fee paying students enrolled in New Zealand universities decreased. A clear correlation between growth in exchange rates and decline in (fee paying) student numbers can be intuitively expected: a higher rate of a given currency makes it relatively more expensive to study in the destination country and therefore reduces its attractiveness to students. Conversely, the fact that e.g. Germany is a relatively cheap country to live in increases its attractiveness.
Show more

72 Read more

House of Commons Library briefing paper : The forthcoming review of post-18 education and funding

House of Commons Library briefing paper : The forthcoming review of post-18 education and funding

funding Cut interest rates Higher None Increase loan repayment threshold Higher None Cut loan repayment rate Higher None Reintroduce maintenance grants Fee waivers or grants Differential[r]

29 Read more

Funding and expenditure in post-16 education: An international review

Funding and expenditure in post-16 education: An international review

regionalised education offices. The Ministry also transfer funds to the regions to pay for technical staff. The regions and departments also have a role in funding goods and services such as materials, utilities and small-scale maintenance using a block grant provided by central government. School funding allocations also take account of other factors such as socio-economic characteristics and special educational needs. This contributes to higher per pupil funding in vocational schools where pupils tend to be lower achievers and come from more deprived backgrounds than those in the academic route. Teachers are paid centrally by the Ministry for Education based on national pay scales. Statutory salaries for teachers across all phases in France are below the OECD average, both for starting teachers and for those with ten or fifteen years' professional experience. Across OECD countries in 2013, statutory salaries (i.e. excluding bonuses and overtime) for teachers in upper secondary education with at least fifteen years' experience
Show more

107 Read more

Future of Work and Education for the Digital Age : evaluating options for funding and financing post-compulsory education

Future of Work and Education for the Digital Age : evaluating options for funding and financing post-compulsory education

As noted earlier, the suitability of a mechanism will in part be determined by the purposes of the education system it serves. This section therefore outlines aspects of policy that might be emphasised at different times or in different jurisdictions. It is important to emphasise that although they are presented as ideal types it is highly unlikely that one policy thrust would ever rationally be pursued to the exclusion of all others; it is hard to conceive for example that any government would completely ignore the efficiency of the system or equally, have no interest other than reducing its unit cost.
Show more

12 Read more

Options for the funding formula for children's social services

Options for the funding formula for children's social services

The latest figures for expenditure at the time of the study on Personal Social Services were for the financial year 2003-04, (CIPFA, 2005) and therefore predate the new Children Act. The net total cost of Children’s and Families Services in England for 2003-04 was just over £4 billion, which represents £362.84 net cost per head of population aged under 18. The most costly elements of the Children and Families Services budget were Commissioning and Social Work (£1 billion) and provision for Children Looked After (£1.8 billion), of which children’s homes accounted for £870 million and fostering services £800 million. Ward et al (2004) showed the variation between the costs of different placement types. The standard unit cost for maintaining a child for a week in residential care was eight times that of the cost of foster care, 9.5 times that of a kinship placement and 12.5 times that of a placement with own parents. There were significant geographical variations in net cost per head of population aged under 18, ranging from £258.93 in the English Counties to £573.97 in London
Show more

99 Read more

Funding Options for Long-Term Health Care

Funding Options for Long-Term Health Care

This article discusses the dif- ference between the first two options. While the government’s role in many medical areas is be- ing hotly debated, its policy on long-term care seems clear—it is the individual’s responsibility. State and federal governments aggressively take steps to prohibit individuals from using government resources if individual assets exist. Additionally, both state and fed- eral governments have policies to encourage individuals to purchase insurance to cover long-term care (see “Government Carrots”). While an entire industry has developed to help people circumvent the government restrictions, it is the author’s belief that not only is providing long-term care the individual’s responsibility, but also that the various government entities will continue to restrict ways to circumvent the overall policy. To do otherwise would
Show more

5 Read more

Essential Programs and Services Review: The Special Education Funding Model

Essential Programs and Services Review: The Special Education Funding Model

This limit was established in 2005 when the prevalence of students with disabilities was at its highest (18.9%). Providing a lower weight (.38) to enrollment above 15% was intended to encourage more judicious interpretation of special education eligibility criteria. Since 2005 the prevalence of students with disabilities has declined although Maine continues to have a higher prevalence rate than most other states. There are many factors other than the 15% limit that may have contributed to this reduction, a reconsideration of the 15% limit is warranted.

33 Read more

The Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance Arrangements in Wales

The Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance Arrangements in Wales

22. A similar dual support system is proposed by the Review Panel to support knowledge transfer. This investment is required to ensure that the research and knowledge generated in universities provides maximum benefit to the economy and society of Wales. The Welsh Government, through HEFCW, should first fund two knowledge transfer hubs; and second instigate an agile, flexible project-based funding stream aimed at projects that will impact on the Welsh economy. These should be administered, by HEFCW, with a minimum level of bureaucracy. In addition, the Welsh Institute for Social and Economic Research and Development should receive core funding from the Welsh Government to impact on social policy, on a five year basis, against the majority of its funding coming from projects.
Show more

8 Read more

Cuts in funding for 18 and 19 year olds

Cuts in funding for 18 and 19 year olds

The outcome of the Spending Review for financial year 2015 to 2016 (2015-16) was that some savings are required from the 16 to 19 participation budget in that year to contribute to reducing the overall public sector budget deficit. Ministers have decided that their policy priorities for this budget are to support the increased participation age for 16- and 17-year-olds, maintain additional funding for disadvantaged students, and as far as possible, maintain the national funding rate per student. Because we are operating within a fixed budget, we will confirm the national funding rate per student for 2014/15, and the flat rates for disadvantaged students without GCSE Grade C or above in English or mathematics, in March when we know the total student numbers we need to fund in 2014/15.
Show more

10 Read more

The Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance Arrangements in Wales

The Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance Arrangements in Wales

9.2.3 The moderated fee should continue to be topped-up with institutional learning and teaching grants for HEIs, paid through HEFCW. In order to ensure that public investment in part-time students is comparable to that for full-time students, the Review Panel recommends that the total grant provision is determined by applying the difference between the full-time and part-time RAB to the average loan (fee and maintenance) available to part-time students. This approach generates a notional teaching grant in the region of £1,250 per student (typical rate based on 50% full-time equivalent). It is also recommended that HEIs receive pro-rata top-up payments for high cost subjects in respect of part-time students, just as they would continue to do under our proposals in respect of full-time students, allocated directly to HEIs by HEFCW. To be eligible for this top-up payment, HEIs must be able to demonstrate to HEFCW that they deliver part-time education in a manner that encourages students to be able to earn as they learn (i.e. the funding is predicated on the organisation in receipt being regulated to ensure quality and organisation).
Show more

84 Read more

Expert Group on Future Funding for Higher Education : Funding Irish Higher Education   A Constructive and Realistic Discussion of the Options, Discussion Paper for Stakeholder Consultation 30th October 2015

Expert Group on Future Funding for Higher Education : Funding Irish Higher Education A Constructive and Realistic Discussion of the Options, Discussion Paper for Stakeholder Consultation 30th October 2015

linked to income levels, but repayments will now only start when the salary reaches the minimum wage level. Repayments will never be more than 4 per cent of income above this level, and the repayment period has been increased from 15 years to 35 years. The savings arising from this reform are being invested in enhancing the quality of higher education provision, including smaller class sizes and greater engagement with students and enhanced grant supports for students from lower income groups. The Dutch approach, and in particular the new reforms being introduced, satisfy many of the principles outlined above. The overall level of investment, supported by both state and student contributions, provide the capacity for high levels of quality and sustainability. While it is one of only a few countries to charge student fees in the EU, the system of income-contingent loans provides that higher education is free at the point of entry. The recent changes to student support arrangements for living costs ensure that all students have support in meeting the costs of participating in higher education. The recognition that students from lower income groups require additional support is likely to strike a chord. There are also lessons in the broader supports provided to all students via the loan system and the provision of the same supports for Masters students.
Show more

40 Read more

Appendix 18 NEC3 Options

Appendix 18 NEC3 Options

The contract provides for certain risks to be carried by the Employer which will result in the lump sum being adjusted if the compensation events occur.. The activity schedule is norma[r]

6 Read more

funding your education

funding your education

Student Aid Report (SAR) A summary of the information you submitted on your FAFSA. You receive this report (often called the SAR) via e-mail a few days after your FAFSA has been processed or by mail within 7–10 days if you did not provide an e-mail address. If there are no corrections or additional information you must provide, the SAR will contain your EFC, which is the number that’s used to determine your eligibility for federal student aid. Subsidized Loan A loan based on financial need for which the federal government pays the interest that accrues while the borrower is in an in-school, grace, or deferment status. For Direct Subsidized Loans first disbursed between July 1, 2012, and July 1, 2014, the borrower will be responsible for paying any interest that accrues during the grace period. If the interest is not paid during the grace period, the interest will be added to the loan’s principal balance.
Show more

36 Read more

Pension Risk Management with Funding and Buyout Options

Pension Risk Management with Funding and Buyout Options

We introduced a transparent pension funding index based on market indices and publicly available mortality tables to increase market liquidity and reduce moral hazard and adverse selecti[r]

24 Read more

Government Funding in Australian Independent Schools

Government Funding in Australian Independent Schools

Though speaking generally about funding rather than specifically about funding of schools, the statement does provide insight into how the notion of funding from external sources should be considered if such funds are used in support of the work. It is clearly evident that the Church’s education system is seen as part of the work. Additional evidence of the strong stand that Ellen White took on the issue of receiving government funds for church work is found in connection with the dispute over the initial decision of the General Conference session of 1895 to decline the offer by Cecil Rhodes to provide funding for the purchase of a 12,000 acre property in South Africa that would later become the site for Solusi College. While the general conference in session instructed the church in South Africa to pay for the land rather than receive a grant, Ellen White strongly objected to that decision to the extent that the session’s decision was reversed. The critical statement she made that revealed her philosophy on accepting external funds was: “We need not sacrifice one principle of truth while taking advantage of every opportunity to advance the cause of God” ((White, 1895, p. 198). This example directly relates to an educational institution gaining funding from external sources and provides insights into what should be done when opportunities to gain support for schools and subsequently the work present themselves.
Show more

17 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...