Top PDF PP: Advancing Project Management in Learning Organizations

PP: Advancing Project Management in Learning Organizations

PP: Advancing Project Management in Learning Organizations

This paper is structured as follows. We start with a brief review of the three dimensions of skills required of a project manager. We then present and substantiate our argument that these skills are essential for project success. We conclude the paper with some observations of our own about advancing project management and the successful delivery of projects in large organizations through programs and initiatives designed to assist both the project manager and the learning organization. This paper is essentially theoretical in nature as we are proposing a way in which project managers can facilitate improving project management performance and learning organizations can support them. It is part of a continuing study that forms the basis for a doctoral thesis of one of the authors 1 . Areas of further research are explored in a later section of this paper. We believe that this paper contributes to the project management body of knowledge by initiating and facilitating discussion on an important aspect of the project manager’s inventory of skills and competencies and the part the learning organization can play in this endeavour.
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KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN LEARNING ORGANIZATIONS

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN LEARNING ORGANIZATIONS

Licensed under Creative Common Page 14 Though these seem to be very simple processes but these are not easy to accomplish. Knowledge sharing needs an environment where the employees has a trust level and are confident that such type of sharing would not jeopardize their professional existence in that organization. According to Holbeche (1999) creating such conditions require to take up three main activities which include; motivation for sharing knowledge, establishment of a proper system for managing and storing information and encouraging people to use that knowledge. If the people see little use of information sharing or the processes is not formalized then the processes is less effective. In order to make the process of information sharing more systematic and more effective the information available is first converted into explicit knowledge for easy comprehension rendering it usable for others. If the individuals are able to understand the purpose of that knowledge then they can easily apply that at their work. “Knowledge tends to generate knowledge when ideas are shared and collaboration is in evidence. Flatter structures, with their emphasis on teamwork and smart ways of working should be ideally suited to the generation and sharing of knowledge” (Holbech, 1999, pp.426).
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PP: What Does a Project Manager Need to Deliver Successful Projects (In large and complex organizations)?

PP: What Does a Project Manager Need to Deliver Successful Projects (In large and complex organizations)?

(Kinder and Robertson 1994) defines four major person styles and characteristics for successful leadership. By analysing successful figures from business and politics such as Anita Brodderick (the Body Shop) and Michael Gorbachov and following up with research, Kinder and Robertson have identified four traits – Creativity, Analysis and Judgement, Resilience and persuasiveness. The list that Yukl defines adds Energy, self-confidence Integrity and emotional maturity to that of Kinder and Robertson. (Yukl 2002) Goleman’s account of “Emotional Intelligence”(Goleman 2000), defines four aspects: self-awareness, self-management, social-awareness and social skills, which match the previous set of traits reasonably closely. (Sweetman 2001), cites data from new studies that have found that the most effective leaders “admit they don’t know all the answers – and are willing to ask employees for help”. This exercise in knowing how to “embrace uncertainty”, according to Sweetman included such aspects as setting inspiring goals and then working with the stakeholders to define the best way to achieve these goals. As was stated earlier in this paper, a good leader is able to apply his/her skills and knowledge to suit the situation, the nature of the followers and the power relationships between leader and led.
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Project Management Training: A Determinant of Project Implementation by Grass-root Support Non-Governmental Organizations in Embu County, Kenya

Project Management Training: A Determinant of Project Implementation by Grass-root Support Non-Governmental Organizations in Embu County, Kenya

management training method assumes implementing a complex of tools for goals setting and results tracking that “raise the bar” upon completion of the preset goals. A PM Coach regularly reviews and updates the goals and then assigns project management classes and seminars in order to educate team members and move them towards achieving desired results (van Kessel, 2006). Project management coaching is the second stage of the project staff training process. Staff mentoring is a complex of relationships between the mentor and the team. The mentor works on unlocking the factors required to let the team develop, generate creative solutions and find new ways to succeed in performing projects. Project management mentoring is the third stage of the project staff training process giving the most effective education tools to organize project management e-learning and plan for staff mentoring courses and online workshops (Biggs & Tang, 2011). The major benefits from implementing PM mentoring and training courses are many: The team becomes more skilled in less time. The team can create new insights and discover new knowledge in the field of managing projects. The team gets access to people, project mentoring workshops, training sessions and other learning opportunities. Mentoring improves skills and competency of project team members. Mentors can hone their skills and enhance academic guidelines, becoming more effective. Mentor communicates with the mentee receiving feedback. Mentors and staff trainers will become more skilled at providing qualified help.
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Measuring Performance of Nonprofit Organizations by Evaluating Integration of Their Values in the Project Management Process

Measuring Performance of Nonprofit Organizations by Evaluating Integration of Their Values in the Project Management Process

Refering to the definition of the UNDP the results-based management is : "a strategy or management method applied by an organization to ensure that its processes, products and services contribute to the achievement of clearly defined outcomes. Results-based management provides a coherent framework for strategic planning and management by improving learning and accountability. It is also a broad management strategy aimed at making significant changes in the way agencies operate, with an emphasis on improving performance and achieving results. This requires the definition of realistic results, monitoring progress in achieving the expected results, integrating lessons learned into management decisions and reporting of information about the performance. "In other words, management process is based on a result of some inputs (resources and activities), and monitoring and evaluation is done on this sense.
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The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory (ASELL) Project: The First Australian Multidisciplinary Workshop

The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory (ASELL) Project: The First Australian Multidisciplinary Workshop

Once the submitter has received and analysed the student feedback data, they will then be in a position to complete the Educational Template and prepare a submission for inclusion on the ASELL database. Complete submissions are then sent for peer review. Submitters receive reports from three referees – one of the referees will be a student who has participated in a previous ASELL workshop, one will be a member of the academic staff of a university, and one will be a member of the ASELL Management Team (comprising the Directors and the Associate Director). Communication with the submitter is carried out by a member of the ASELL Management Team other than the one who has refereed the complete submission. The submission is evaluated on both scientific and educational grounds, using the peer review criteria. Normal editorial processes are followed, in that the submitter has the opportunity to respond to the comments of the referees, but the final editorial decision rests with ASELL. Acceptance of the submission leads to the inclusion of the experiment in the ASELL database as an ASELL experiment, where details of the experiment, the Educational Template, and supporting documents for the experiment (e.g. student notes, technical notes, risk assessments, etc) are available. If the submitter chooses to publish a full journal paper (in which case the manuscript must also contain discussion of the educational analysis of the experiment) then acceptance for publication on the website (as described above) leads to automatic acceptance for journal publication with the manuscript usually subject to minor editing only. Submitters will be asked to indicate their preferred journal for publication as ASELL has agreements for publication of validated chemistry experiments with two journals – the Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry (published in Australia by the Royal Australian Chemical Institute) and Chemistry Education Research and Practice (published online by the Royal Society of Chemistry). Journals for publications in the areas of physics and biology education are currently being negotiated.
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Project Management in Information Organizations

Project Management in Information Organizations

This course will involve the exchange of ideas, questions, and comments in an online and/or blended learning community. In all of your class communications, please use the same tact and respect that you would if you were talking to classmates face to face. Remember that in online communication the visual and auditory aspects are missing, so be especially careful to ensure your emails and discussion postings accurately convey your meaning and are not open to misconstruction. Humor is especially difficult to convey in this environment, so take extra care with your writing. Please maintain your professionalism and courtesy at all times when
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Project, program and portfolio management in large Dutch organizations : determining the maturity of project, program, and portfolio processes and identifying bottlenecks in further professionalizing the project organization

Project, program and portfolio management in large Dutch organizations : determining the maturity of project, program, and portfolio processes and identifying bottlenecks in further professionalizing the project organization

Companies usually decide on ‘quick-wins’ and select a surplus on small projects and consequently have few major hits [Cooper et al., 2000]. Artto, 2001a states that “a fundamental question is the problem of how to organize the whole corporation’s responsibilities, decision making, and objective setting concerning projects. These issues relate also to questions of relevant information content, information sharing, and aspects of learning [Artto, 2001a].” Furthermore Artto, 2001b describes the main problems in multi-project environments as each key individual is involved in too many projects – under capacity, the competence in other individuals is not used effectively – overcapacity, similar work entities are run in parallel in different parts of the organization – lack of coordination, results of project activities are not used in other projects – lack of coordination, too many (small) projects, too many projects as compared to available resources, projects do not support achievement of business objectives; projects do not carry appropriate value for the business, a lack of balance of projects as a whole, and too much information; lack of relevant information [Artto, 2001b]. Elonen and Artto, 2003 states that the main managerial problems in project portfolios are no link between strategy and project selection, poor-quality portfolios, reluctance to kill projects [Staw and Ross, 1987], scarce resources and additionally a lack of focus, selecting short-term and easy projects, information overflow and lacking quality of information, and decision making based on power. Furthermore the authors define six problem areas based on the managerial problems that have been found. The problem areas that can be distinguished are inadequate project level activities, lacking resources, competencies and methods, lacking commitment
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Construction Project Management: An Experiential Learning Case Study

Construction Project Management: An Experiential Learning Case Study

Other emergent themes were identified as contributors to the success of the learning in the case study subject were made salient by the student feedback. Firstly, students found the subject to be the unique, different from other subjects that they had undertaken in their previous studies. This was partially due to the hands-on nature of this subject but also the integration and work with the not-for-profit organisations. Some of the unique features noted in student feedback included the opportunity to work with tradesmen and workers that do not speak the same language yet completing the building project through common construction knowledge and developing an understanding of construction in a developing country. The work with charities was a clear theme expressed by students with one commenting that they “were able to help do something that would practically help people in another country who need our help whilst not only learning about construction practices, their differences and also about the culture itself” And another noting “The chance to help disadvantaged people and giving back. Very rewarding way to finish my degree”.
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Project Management Practices and Performance of Nongovernmental Organizations Projects in Nairobi City County, Kenya

Project Management Practices and Performance of Nongovernmental Organizations Projects in Nairobi City County, Kenya

The researcher adopted descriptive survey design. Descriptive research design is primarily concerns to address exact attributes of a precise population during a certain period of time for comparison purpose (Rice, 2007; pg. 25). Further, (Lewis, Saunders and Thornhill, 2009) points out that descriptive research designs are characterized by systematic collections of information from subjects of a given population through questionnaire. The survey design was appropriate for this study because the researcher did not manipulate the variables. A descriptive research survey design provides an appropriate technique of collecting data in regards to the study variables on project management practices. This design is preferred because it makes enough provision for protection against bias and maximizes reliability (Kothari 2012). The descriptive design is able to give more information concerning the variable in question as this study design is chosen where the research requires a description of a phenomena or an object.
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PP: Effective Project Governance – Linking PMI’s Standards to Project Governance

PP: Effective Project Governance – Linking PMI’s Standards to Project Governance

the emerging legal framework and the likely short and long term impact of the legislative changes on organisational governance. The paper predicted an initial focus on developing systems and avoiding risk, followed by smart businesses using their improved systems and information flows to create new competitive advantages; this trend is likely to continue. The paper also identified the need for effective project; program and portfolio management to ensure project delivery conformed to overall corporate governance requirements and suggested an appropriate framework.

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Project Organizations and Their Present and Preferred Culture

Project Organizations and Their Present and Preferred Culture

A project team plays an important role in project success. Based on the general team definition of Katzenbach and Smith (1993), project teams can be defined as temporary organizations containing a small number of people with complementary skills who are committed to the project’s purpose, a set of project goals, and a common approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable. Aggteleky and Bajna (1994) differentiate between core-team and temporary-team members. While core-team members participate in the whole project process from the beginning to the end, temporary-team members are specialist who enter into the project at a well-defined moment and work on the project for a certain time period based on the project time schedule (Figure 2).
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Management control, accountability, and learning in public sector organizations: A critical analysis

Management control, accountability, and learning in public sector organizations: A critical analysis

(1) Following Hofstede’s flow chart, the staff employees considered the objectives of university teaching and education as relatively unambigu- ous, while they viewed output both quantitatively (numbers of lectures, workgroups, contact hours, etc.) and qualitatively (grading assign- ments, term papers, exam results, etc.) as reasonably measurable. The staff employees considered the effects of management interventions as fairly unknown, among others thinking back to their own interventions in the past. Finally, they viewed teaching and education as non- repetitive activities: Although courses and classes are repeated every year, ideally their contents are continuously being refreshed and updated on the basis of last year’s experiences and new developments in the field. All in all, the staff employees concluded that intuitive control was most suitable for teaching and education activities in universities. (2) Looking at the type of control actually applied to teaching and educa-
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Hospice Home Immersion Project: Advancing Medical Education

Hospice Home Immersion Project: Advancing Medical Education

The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNECOM) Hospice Immersion project was piloted in 2014 in southern Maine. It was designed and implemented as an experien- tial medical education learning model whereby medical students were “admitted” into the local Hospice Home to live there for 48 hours. Until this project, palliative and end of life care education at US Medical Schools and specifically UNECOM were accomplished through traditional medical education methods. The Hospice Immersion project utilizes qualitative ethnographic and autobio- graphic research designs, whereby a unique environment or “culture” (Hospice Home) is observed and life experiences of the medical student before, during, and immediately after the immersion are reported by him/her. The purpose of the Hospice Immersion project is to provide second year medical students with firsthand experiences of living in the Hospice Home for 48 hours to answer the question: “What it is like FOR ME to live in the Hospice Home?” The results focus on the students’ common themes that include 1) Unknown Territory; 2) Support; 3) Role of Staff; 4) Role of Immer- sion Learning in Palliative and End of Life Care; 5) Facing Death and Dying; and 6) Clinical Pearls. This project humanizes dying and death, solidified student realization that dying is a part of life and what an honor it is to be a part of the care process that alleviates pain, increases comfort, val- ues communication, and human connections. Students report new found skills in patient care such as the 1) importance of physical touch; 2) significance of communication at the end of life for the patient, family, and staff; 3) the value of authenticity and sincerity that comes from being com- fortable with oneself, which allows silence to communicate caring; 4) connection with and aware- ness of the person (rather than their terminal illness) and their family; and 5) the importance of speaking with patients and their families about end of life plans in advance. Although this is a time intensive experience for the faculty member and the Hospice Home staff, the depth of learning experienced by the students and opportunities to advance medical education in death and dying are well worth the efforts.
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Knowledge Management Pattern for Project-Based Organizations in Energy Industry: A Grounded Theory Study

Knowledge Management Pattern for Project-Based Organizations in Energy Industry: A Grounded Theory Study

Knowledge management (KM) has received considerable attention in the energy sector (Ranjbarfard, Aghdasi, Lopez et al., 2014), which is because of the crucial role of knowledge in generating productivity and its importance in the global economy (Zhao, De Pablo & Qi, 2012). KM has different definitions. One definition is a systemic and organizationally specified process for acquiring, organizing, and communicating both tacit and explicit knowledge of employees so that other employees may utilize it to be more effective and productive in their work (Ahmed, 2017). According to another definition, KM is a process in which an organization generates wealth from its knowledge or intellectual capital (Nonaka and Takeuchi, 1995). Moreover, knowledge is unique as an organizational resource in that the value of knowledge as a resource rises during use while that
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PP: The Accidental Project Manager – The Getting of Wisdom

PP: The Accidental Project Manager – The Getting of Wisdom

This paper has described the accidental project manager and the novice project manager: they are at the same disadvantage, lacking experience and often organisational support in their journey to success. The difference between the two is that the accidental PM has been conscripted and does not intend to stay in the profession; the novice has a desire to stay in the profession. For both types of PM, project success is crucial: project failure will cause them to look elsewhere. This waste of resource is perpetuated by an organisational strategy of crisis management through conscripting individuals to ‘accept the poisoned chalice’ of managing projects without support. This paper also describes the author’s theory of three dimensions of project management and the supporting tool, the Stakeholder Circle™, and identifies ways that organisations and the PM profession can support the accidental PM’s growth from a ‘novice’ through to being successful.
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PP: Effective Project Governance – The Tools for Success

PP: Effective Project Governance – The Tools for Success

The competencies needed by a project manager to successfully manage projects are defined in ‘The Project Manager Competency Development Framework’ (also from PMI). The framework is designed to guide individuals as they build their capabilities, skills and knowledge to effectively manage projects. As their knowledge increases, people working in the project or project support environment (eg, the PMO) can acquire either the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) credential if they are working as team members or Project Management Professional (PMP) credential if they have been ‘directing and leading’ project teams for a minimum period of 36 months. Both credentials require the candidate to demonstrate specific training and/or experience to apply for the exam and then pass a rigorous
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MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP IN ORGANIZATIONS

MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP IN ORGANIZATIONS

normative-reeducative, power-coercive approaches. Guidelines to Effective Management of Change. Building and maintaining powerbase. The concept of power. Five sources of power. Influence versus manipulation. Negotiating agreement and commitment. Four principles for getting ‘yes’. The freedom scale in negotiating expectations. Effective presentation of ideas. The SSSAP framework: set, sequence, support, access, polish.

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Conflict Management in Organizations

Conflict Management in Organizations

According to some studies, regarding the conflict causes and why it develops, the conflict arises due to various reasons. Also, the results of the questionnaire show that the conflict is not merely caused by just one reason, rather than a variety of reasons that affect the appearance and development of the conflict. During its development, the conflict may escalate, and this often occurs due to the involved parties’ influence on the emotional state. Prior to this, it is up to the manager to react and try to take advantage of the conflict. Conflicts occur when individuals and groups consider their objective to be too important and exclusive to others. (Kume,2010, p.285) Therefore, when conflict occurs, we need to use conflict approaches, in order to approach and manage the conflict. Regarding the forms of access, conflict access approach has positive forms of access, mainly of low self-interest and high interest to others, or of high interest to both parties. After the access, we reach the main part of the conflict, where we confront with conflict and need to manage it. The management process is not a simple process, rather than a process that needs to undergo some steps. Firstly, the problem should be diagnosed, then the intervention (in structure or process) should be done. In the case of intervention, the confrontation with the conflict occurs, and after the intervention, we understand the positive or negative effect that conflict gives in that case. In addition to this process, organizational justice, the role of emotions, the taking of perspective, brainstorming or “brain shake,” the profile of conflict dynamics, the compilation of the logical argument, the Vaaland improvement model, and negotiation are of great importance in conflict management.
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Marketing management of organizations

Marketing management of organizations

Dans ce chapitre, nous analysons les différents outils de la communication individualisée : le marketing direct et interactif, le marketing viral fondé sur le bouche-à-oreille, et enfin[r]

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