Top PDF Problem Orientation in Art and Technology

Problem Orientation in Art and Technology

Problem Orientation in Art and Technology

The study program focuses on the interplay and overlaps between art and technology. The domains of art and the sciences associated with technology belong to two different knowledge systems or paradigms. While technical sciences are dominated by the positivist traditions within the natural sciences, the domain of contemporary art is sprawling in many directions and also linked to the human and social sciences. Similarly, artists are not scientists, but operate with other forms of knowledge production, than in academic traditions. Art and Technology shares this kind of hybrid identity with other interdisciplinary programs that involve designing/constructing components. Within the AAU, e.g. the engineering program with a specialization in architecture, where the scientific paradigm account for many parts of a project, and scientific ideals of truth determine whether any given task is solved in the right way, but at some point in an architecture or Art and Technology project, science is not enough and can not stand alone, as Lars Botin puts it: ”at some point in the design process art, aesthetics, faith and convictions will take over, and it does not make sense to talk about these aspects of the educations as science, but as kinds of knowledge production”. The question of how to implement the “Aalborg Model” in the creative/artistic educations at AAU, has been discussed and exemplified in a number of research papers that primarily focus on the study programmes within architecture and design at AAU, that highlight the need for attention towards the development of an artistic skill set in the individual student, and the role of talent and artistic identity that inevitably are parts of the professional identity the students of these subjects have to establish.
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Perceptions of Creativity in Art, Music and Technology Education

Perceptions of Creativity in Art, Music and Technology Education

open ended activities with an emphasis on generating a very personal product via a process couched in emotional and physical exploration of the students’ environment, promotes a unique creative learning opportunity indeed. Unlike the fields of technology education and art, music may possess few creativity characteristics that it can organically call its own. Rather, the subject offers students a hybrid of creative opportunities that do not exist anywhere else in their school day. It would be easy to say that from a sensory standpoint, music education has a monopoly on offering a unique creative opportunity. Upon closer examination however, a more accurate synopsis of music education’s curricular capabilities would include its ability to cover concepts such as the personality, aesthetics, and metaphors in and of creative artistic expression; being able to nurture both convergent and divergent thinking; and encouraging creative performance in both an individual and group environment. When compared to the other subjects in this study, music educators have the power to expose creative ability in students that may only be ephemeral in the curriculum of other courses.
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Connecting art and technology : background considerations

Connecting art and technology : background considerations

However, as we have already pointed out, we cannot dismiss the distinction between art and technology as entirely without point or substance, as merely some cultural misconception. The social changes already described as well as others involved in the move of European societies toward industrialism have wrought significant changes in the place of art, engineering, technology, and science in our society and our culture. For one, the perceived division between the arts and the sciences discussed earlier does have its institutional expressions, not least in the education and training of the respective practitioners. Engineering cannot now be mastered through an apprenticeship but requires a high degree of theoretical knowledge as well as, sometimes, practical experience. It has become a discipline – or set of disciplines – no longer a craft. The training of artists, though more variable than in the case of engineering, is also more ‘professionalised’ and though inevitably retaining important craft elements does not require routine exposure to engineering theory as a requirement for the practise of the artistic endeavour.
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Art and Design and Design and Technology: Is there creativity in the designing?

Art and Design and Design and Technology: Is there creativity in the designing?

It is argued in this paper that designing as a creative activity used by professional designers, includes the three phases of analysis, synthesis and evaluation and is a combination of procedural and conceptual knowledge (de Vries, 2005). However, there is an issue of whether pupils, as ‘novice’ designers, can rely solely on learning the process of ‘designing’ to ensure their creativity potential in the context of a school classroom. Creativity occurs when a number of dimensions coincide, sometimes known as ‘the creativity intersection’ (Amabile, 1989: 63). The features that are necessary for creative activity include sound domain, subject knowledge and skills, process relevant features including designing as an interactive, iterative creative problem solving heuristic process. In order to achieve this complex concept a pupil will need to develop vision, confidence, a willing to take risks, motivation and be proactive and an independent thinker. Teachers will be required to plan interesting, open- ended schemes of work in relevant contexts, using a range of strategies to motivate, empower and help develop appropriate skills. They need to give pupils opportunities for ‘dwell’ time to reflect and collaborate with their peers. The social environment, or the classroom, is a key factor and it must be supportive, rewarding, secure and conducive to risk taking, the development of peer relationships and the effective use of space and resources. ‘Blurring the boundaries’ is a positive step forward and this can be achieved through collaboration between teachers of art and design and design and technology. This has the potential to support and improve creativity in design and technology, within the context of appreciating and understanding the similarities and differences of the subjects and their individual identities.
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is a rose A Performative Installation in the Context of Art and Technology

is a rose A Performative Installation in the Context of Art and Technology

Already in 1967, more than half a century ago, one of the most known AST programs was initiated in the USA by artist Robert Rauschenberg and engineer Billy Klüver under the name “Experiments in Art and Technology” (EAT) [Shan05]. The EAT was a platform that was connecting 2000 artists and an equal number of engineers and had set a ground-breaking foundation for similar endeavors. One of the leading interdisciplinary hubs in the world today is the MIT Media Lab. Professor Neri Oxman, the founder and director of the Mediated Matter, one of the Lab´s research groups, presented the ​ Krebs Cycle of Creativity ​ [Oxma16] – ​ an antidisciplinary hypothesis and the attempt to work regardless of disciplinary boundaries towards a more interdisciplinary, entangled approach of research. Institutions such as Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie (ZKM) in Karlsruhe or the Ars Electronica Center in Linz are still among the best examples of European AST programs [Shan05]. There is a growing number of AST programmes funded by local governments and the EU. Both art and technology have been contributing to their encounters in their own way. By using technology as its new medium, art witnesses not only the prospects of technological accessibility but also reconfirms its postmodern tendency to subsume and refer to everything that surrounds it. Contemporary art both intuitively appropriates technology as a medium of its expression, at the same time wittingly commenting it and reflecting on its role as such.
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The art of technology: a case study approach to linking art, design and technology at key stage 4

The art of technology: a case study approach to linking art, design and technology at key stage 4

The pressures of a timetable that separated the teaching time of Design Communication from that of Art led to difficulties with the exchange of information. This also meant that there was less cross-curricular experience for students than expected although at times cross influences were evident. The design process was a particularly strong influence in Design Communication and technology staff felt that there was a great deal to be gained from sharing experiences between the two departments. Some pupils in Art found that their skills did not match their aspirations, which resulted in some tension in classroom practice. However, the most capable developed the positive aspects of the project to their advantage. Some staff felt that the project was too ambitious. Everyone felt that a more specific problem would be needed if the experience was to be repeated. Overall, however, the staff felt that it was good to offer a realistic problem to students and that they had improved their own teaching skills.
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Technology-Supported Art as a "Way to Participation"

Technology-Supported Art as a "Way to Participation"

participation in normalized routines through assistive technology. Her family looks forward to Evelyn having some control over her physical environment and the ability to engage fully in family routines. Evelyn likes to go to school, play games, watch movies, use stickers, and travel, but most of all, she seems to enjoy joking with her family. Prior to the accident, Evelyn enjoyed making art. She continues to enjoy art and is proud to show off her completed projects, although she currently participates only in making decisions about how the art is completed, guiding others to complete the work for her. Unlike Brianna, she does not have the space or technology in her home or at school to participate independently in art making. With help from her family, she is able to create digital art on an ipad using a mouth stick. Increasing independence with art-based activities can increase her sense of autonomy, an important developmental achievement (Mulcahey et al., 2010). Evelyn looks forward to opportunities, technology, and training in the future to be able to create art independently.
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Art and technology against gender violence

Art and technology against gender violence

En temas de avances tecnológicos y estudios culturales de género son referencia obligada las Plataformas Universitarias de Toronto, Canadian Women´s Studies On-Line, la de la Universidad de Chicago, Center for Gender Studies, y la de la Universidad de Virginia, Women´s Studies. Estas y otras plataformas tienen hoy en día la finalidad de dar cabida a la voz de colectivos de mujeres y visibilizar problemas de discriminación, relacionándose ampliamente con el mundo de la cultura sonora y visual, de manera que han creado así mismo productos culturales como radios independientes o exposiciones monográficas. Respecto al avance que supone para la mujer el uso de las nuevas tecnologías en relación al arte, cabe destacar la Sociedad Internacional Leonardo para las Artes, la Ciencia y la Tecnología (ISAST), que se ha dedicado a publicar articulos punteros de mujeres en este campo. La reciente publicación Women, Art and Technology, editada por Judy Malloy, da fe de la labor que están llevando a cabo las mujeres en el ámbito del arte y las nuevas tecnologías y abarca así mismo, una parte importante de la labor en torno a la violencia de género.
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The art of regeneration: the establishment and development of the Foundation for Art and Creative Technology, 1985–2010

The art of regeneration: the establishment and development of the Foundation for Art and Creative Technology, 1985–2010

Without further information, verifying these statistics and therefore ascertaining the value of a scheme of this nature, both in the provision of access to resources and training, remains an open question as the developments occurred at the same time as other changes within media arts, both nationally and globally. However, the longevity of the MITES programme, and the apparent popularity of its rentals service, suggests that art institutions, curators and artists were keen to have access to the services MITES provided. The reliance of the early Video Positive festivals on loans and sponsorship for presentation equipment highlights the financial restraints on organisations which prevented them from accumulating, and continually updating, state-of-the-art technological equipment, especially in the volume required for large media events. The cost of equipment is a contributing factor behind the absence of media art in British galleries, although Gillman also stated that art organisations were “terrified” of the technology required for media art exhibition at this time. 541 Without customer feedback, it is difficult to prove the influence of MITES during a period of significant growth in output and popularity of media art practice, but the fact that there was no other organisation offering a similar service to MITES, and a dearth of training courses for people involved in developing exhibitions, suggests that the service was integral to the demystification of technology and its application in art at that time. Furthermore, FACT still provides a rental service which is well subscribed today, and this demonstrates that even with cheaper and more readily available technology, there is still a demand for technological support.
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Geopolymer technology: the current state of the art

Geopolymer technology: the current state of the art

The current state of the art in geopolymer technology may be succinctly summarized as follows: much work has been done, yet much work remains to be done. Research in this field has historically been applications-focused, and the mechanisms and processes underlying geopoly- mer formation, and controlling the structures of the products of these reactions, have only relatively recently become the subject of detailed attention. However, progress is being made in this area, and the understand- ing that has been developed to date provides indications that geopolymer technology does in fact have the potential for wide-scale utilization in the construction industry, as well as in other niche applications. The more knowledge is built on this foundation, the closer the eventual goal of tailored geopolymer design becomes, which will allow exploitation of the full technological potential of these materials. This review has provided a relatively brief overview of the progress in geopolymer science and technology over the past two or more decades, and it is hoped that future research progress in this field will drive the commercial and industrial success of these materials as an environmentally friendly solu- tion to some of the materials selection problems faced by the construction industry.
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Health Technology Assessment – science or art?

Health Technology Assessment – science or art?

Moreover, HTA is subject to general values in society and in medicine. HTA is closely related to Evidence Based Medicine [41], which has been criticized for being an “ideology” hostile to humanity and threatening to medi- cine’s identity as an “art.” In HTA, as in general in most so called developed countries, there has been a rather firm belief in technology and in progress [25]. There is what has been called a progress bias. It is presupposed that there will be development, improvement, and eco- nomic growth, and that this is a good in itself. Advanced hi-tech has higher prestige than lo-tech or no-tech. To see is better than not to see, or not to know. E. g., imaging technologies have intrinsic values [35]. We tend to need more and better evidence to call a halt on a technology (disinvestment) than to implement one, and “loss aver- sion,” “stakeholder inertia”, “entrenchment” has been identified in health technology management [8]. Although HTA agencies may be much more critical than other au- thorities and social agencies, the new is often considered to be better than the old (i. e. the sometimes fallacious, argumentum ad novitatem). E. g. when introduced, proton therapy was considered to be better than radiotherapy [11], and robot assisted surgery was considered to be better than ordinary surgery [1].
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State of the Art in Translation Memory Technology

State of the Art in Translation Memory Technology

uwe.reinke@fh-koeln.de Commercial Translation Memory systems (TM) have been available on the market for over two decades now. They have become the major language technology to support the translation and localization industries. The following paper will provide an overview of the state of the art in TM technology, explaining the major concepts and looking at recent trends in both commercial systems and research. The paper will start with a short overview of the history of TM systems and a description of their main components and types. It will then discuss the relation between TM and machine translation (MT) as well as ways of integrating the two types of translation technologies. After taking a closer look at data exchange standards relevant to TM environments the focus of the paper then shifts towards approaches to enhance the retrieval performance of TM systems looking at both non-linguistic and linguistic approaches.
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LACMA Introduces Art + Technology Lab

LACMA Introduces Art + Technology Lab

“Forty-four years ago Turrell and Robert Irwin collaborated on a ganzfeld installation for LACMA’s ‘Art and Technology’ initiative. They were assisted by Ed Wortz, a Garrett Corporation psychologist who did human-factors engineering for NASA missions. In August 1969 Turrell walked off the project, and the ganzfeld installation was never realized. Since then the Turrell-Irwin-Wortz collaboration has taken on mythic dimensions as the greatest light and space work that never was. Turrell’s recent series of perception cells are the closest approximation to it.”

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Keywords: Constructivism, technology, art, utopia, propaganda.

Keywords: Constructivism, technology, art, utopia, propaganda.

The plan, and later the construction of the model of this new ambitious invention but which, like the tower of the Third International Exhibition, was never realized, today not only does it recount the inspiration of the new innovative artist-engineer, but it also witnesses the multifaceted field of his knowledge which, in this case, was ranging from the fields of aerospace, industrial design and visual arts, through to the fields of biology, medicine and micro-surgery 7 . The ideas and principles that dominated Tatlin’s design work served as inspiration also for Piotr Miturovich, one more follower of the utilitarian value of new artifacts. More specifically, he maintained that both the art and the artist were decorated by an emotional emblem of the world, which should be creative and innovative though. This principle could reveal spanking new, radical aspects of the universe itself and therefore such an art would no doubt have the potential to have an impact on science and technology, bringing to light new forms and directions. The purpose of the artist was then clear: he was to explore and discover what was happening around him, what problems occurred and to work out solutions through science and technology. Observing nature and its phenomena, engineering, science and aeronautics, he discovered that the nature of the waves (of gas, liquid) could represent a unique form of movement that was a key to all areas of transport or transfer, both in the air and in the water. He used this principle (which he called volnovoe dvizhenie) in a flying machine, as well as a series of structures devised in the period spanning from 1922 to 1935, to which he has given the generic name volnovik (wave
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Art, Technology and Ideation

Art, Technology and Ideation

environmentalism and sustainability need to inform the ethical agenda of any art forms which engage with technology. My anachronistic example of weaving, which I started with, is work which is socially and culturally engaged with specific roles and identities attached to production and consumption and these often include culturally embedded sustainable practices for living. My most recent work on my Cities of Sanctuary project is seeking to develop ways of creating both meaningful artefacts which are socially engaged and collaborative which rely on technology for their production, but also the means of disseminating and sharing these outputs. The latter is a di ffi cult thing to do in a world of cat-videos, commercial Vloggers and pornography which continue to flood the Internet and attract the attention of a large proportion of its users. However, I would be interested to hear and learn from others at this conference how they negotiate their creative practice and engagement in the current technological environment, as well as how they seek to intervene and disrupt the conventional uses and paradigms of the multiple strands of technology whose possibilities have yet to be explored for non-industrial and creative uses.
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Art And Technology: Revealing Human Caring    In Nursing

Art And Technology: Revealing Human Caring In Nursing

There is a strong link between art, technology and human caring. Entrenched in this link is the interrelationship between the expected objectification of technologies, and the subjectivities envisaged in human caring as revealed through art. It is critical to nursing and health care that the world of human caring is studied through a variety of lenses including disciplinary and ―extra-disciplinary‖ viewpoints. Today, contemporary and futurist views of nursing and health care are immersed in colossal technological developments often blurring illuminations of the value of knowing persons as caring within the human health care world. Art is an essential component of human life. Self-expression through language, music, and imagery is an essential part of being human (Thistle, 2012). In understanding and appreciating art, Aristotle posits the fourfold causes to objectify. These are causa materialis, causa formalis, causa finalis, and causa efficiens. When these causes are exploited to the fullest, these bring forth the essence of its construction to be known. Therefore, a thing (i.e. art), according to Aristotle is best understood by looking at its end, purpose, or goal (Burton, 2017). In his book, The Question Concerning Technology, the German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1977) accentuated technology as the means to an end, in which technology is realized as not instrumental and having no time. Any form of technology connotes its quintessential form from the moment it is designed. In nursing, technology becomes aggressive and provocative in its functions in order to illuminate thereby alleviating human conditions.
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Maurice Blanchot : art and technology

Maurice Blanchot : art and technology

This thesis does not endeavour to provide an exhaustive account of Blanchot’s critical work or narratives; it instead examines discrete moments when there is a shift in his thought in which a thinking of technology is implied. The analysis of techne offered by Heidegger shows that the relationship between art and the utilitarian warrants further scrutiny. The first chapter of this thesis traces the division between poetic and everyday language in work by Stéphane Mallarmé, the Jena Romantics, the Russian Formalists, Martin Heidegger and Jean-Paul Sartre, who, despite their vastly different concerns, all remain committed to a dual state of language, before considering the treatment of this division by Blanchot in essays on Mallarmé dating from 1940 to 1952. Blanchot initially commits to a distinction between the poetic and the everyday, but there is evidence of a shift from as early as 1941, which becomes more pronounced by 1946, with implications for his reading of Heidegger and Husserl. The conversion of which Blanchot writes in the letter to Roger Laporte is something like the phenomenological reduction, a bracketing off of world, rather than an exchange of one set of religious beliefs for another, but not one that provides ontological foundation or rediscovers the transcendental ego. This chapter demonstrates the radical non-essentiality of literature, associated with ambiguity and rootlessness, once the limits of art are challenged.
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State-Of-The-Art Of Solar Photovoltaic (Spv) Technology

State-Of-The-Art Of Solar Photovoltaic (Spv) Technology

The early dominance of silicon in the laboratory has extended to the market for commercial modules. Crystalline silicon designs have never accounted for less than 80% of the market for commercial modules and nearly 15–18% of the market was not crystalline silicon. It was based on amorphous silicon-a PV technology that is almost exclusively used for consumer electronics such as watches and calculators. If we were to exclude electronics and define the market as el ectricity delivery system of 1 kW or more, current production is dominated by single-crystal and polycrystalline silicon modules, which represent 94% of the market. There are a wide range of PV cell technologies on the market today, using different types of materials, and an even larger number will be available in the future. PV cell technologies are usually classified into three generations, depending on the basic material used and the level of commercial maturity [7].(i) First-generation PV systems (fully commercial) use the wafer- based crystalline silicon (c-Si) technology, either single crystalline (sc-Si) or multicrystalline (mc-Si).(ii) Second-generation PV systems (early market deployment) are based on thin-film PV technologies and generally include three main families: (1) amorphous (a-Si) and micromorph silicon (a-Si/ c-Si); (2) cadmium telluride (CdTe); and (3) copper indium
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Silver nanoparticle ink technology: state of the art

Silver nanoparticle ink technology: state of the art

first nanotechnology ever discovered and applied was that of black ink based on carbon black and bone black, containing fullerenes and a wide variety of aromatic small molecules. Today, printing technology has expanded its horizon toward the realization of electron devices on any substrate, according to two main approaches: 1) analog printing, involving the use of linear/rotary machines that are able to realize multiple copies of the same pattern at a rather high speed (serigraphy, gravure, offset, flexography), involving generally microstructured inks; and 2) digital printing, where raster machines realize at rather slow speed a single copy of a pattern that could be changed simply working at the software level (inkjet printing, 3-D print- ing), involving nanostructured inks. In Figure 1, an example of a complex circuit realized on an unconventional substrate
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Technology in precision viticulture: a state of the art review

Technology in precision viticulture: a state of the art review

Hyperspectral remote sensing provides a powerful insight into the spectral response of soils and vegetated surfaces, collecting reflectance data over a wide spectral range at high resolution (typically 10 nm), while multispectral sen- sors acquire reflectance data in a reduced spectrum range focused on the blue, green, red, and near-infrared regions, with less resolution (at least 40 nm wide). Another field of application is the study of the canopy structure and biomass by light detection and ranging (LiDAR) systems, a remote sensing technology that measures distance by illuminating a target with a laser and analyzing the reflected light. Figure 2 shows some of the newest remote sensing sensors used in precision viticulture.
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