Top PDF Professional development and the role of mentorship

Professional development and the role of mentorship

Professional development and the role of mentorship

To perform the mentorship role effectively and to fulfil their responsibilities, mentors should have certain personal attributes as identified in the literature. These characteristics include friendliness, a good sense of humour, patience, effective interpersonal skills, approachability and professional development abilities (Andrews and Wallis 1999, Papp et al 2003, Wilkes 2006). Although these attributes are part of an individual’s personality, staff teaching on professional preparation programmes and future mentors can play an active role in developing these attributes. However, as more mentorship programmes move towards distance learning, it may be difficult for staff in educational establishments to assess whether or not a mentor possesses these qualities, and if he or she does not, how they can help the mentor to develop them. Because of the subjective nature of these characteristics, it is difficult to ensure that a mentor has these qualities and this is evidenced by their absence in the requirements identified by the NMC (2006) to support learning and assessment in practice.
Show more

6 Read more

The role of continuous professional development in closing the gap in educational attainment : a review of what works at classroom, school and system levels

The role of continuous professional development in closing the gap in educational attainment : a review of what works at classroom, school and system levels

The quality of teaching is undoubtedly an important factor in trying to address this gap and so continuing professional development (CPD) has as significant role to play. However, on its own it cannot reduce the attainment gap in isolation and a far more holistic approach with dedicated resources is required to address such an entrenched problem. This means increasing the levels of engagement of parents and other agencies and ensuring that they work together in local, school-led teams under the leadership of high quality, dedicated head teachers and teachers who have a specific, unrelenting and exclusive focus on raising the expectations and achievement of pupils from low-income homes.
Show more

59 Read more

The lived experience of neophyte nursing instructors: mentorship and its role in their development

The lived experience of neophyte nursing instructors: mentorship and its role in their development

This study includes the insight from six participants from two institutions, limiting generalizability of findings. Due to the small sample size, it cannot be concluded that saturation was reached, which is a limitation and potential flaw in this study. The rich narrative descriptions that could be expanded through interviewing more neophyte nursing instructors from various educational institutions may further our understand- ing of how mentorship plays a role in their development. Though the sole focus of this paper is on the mentorship experiences of neophyte nursing instructors, additional research on both mentee and mentor experiences may provide greater insight into the role of mentorship in developing both experienced and neophyte nursing instructors.
Show more

11 Read more

Longitudinal mentorship to support the development of medical students’ future professional role: a qualitative study

Longitudinal mentorship to support the development of medical students’ future professional role: a qualitative study

In Forslund’s model of professional competence [27, 28], individuals’ personalities are integrated in the ‘per- sonal profile, ’ which is the foundation for all professional activities. In this mentoring programme the personal re- lationship with the mentor helped students to see the profession as being integrated with the person behind the professional role, and the early access to the clinical environment together with the mentor enabled an early start of their own integration into the profession. The recurring self-assessment contributed to awareness of their own personal characteristics and habits, and to evaluating them in relation to the profession of a phys- ician. The students noticed changes in their own behav- iour during the mentorship, which might be related to mentoring with a focus on non-medical skills and the professional behaviour of a physician. This model of mentoring leads to reflection on one’s own personality, which can contribute to the students’ development of the professional role and their ‘personal profile’ [27, 28]. This model of mentorship, including a permissive atmos- phere and space to develop alongside the educational programme, a personal relationship with a physician and a directed content, enabled the students to integrate the professional with the personal and the private with the whole. The longitudinal mentoring programme enabled the students to start this process at an early stage of their education.
Show more

10 Read more

The effectiveness of continuing professional development program in enhancing teachers’ competencies to achieve teachers’ standards

The effectiveness of continuing professional development program in enhancing teachers’ competencies to achieve teachers’ standards

A number of research studies indicated that teachers’ efficiency at all stages of the education system is the cornerstone for the success of educational process; i.e. the positive or negative impact of the teacher on the student cannot be matched by any other factor, as teacher looked at an inspiration and role model for his students (Fieman-Nemser, 2001; Danielson, 2007). Therefore, most countries are giving high priority to organizing and preparing good programs for training teachers and setting the necessary standards to ensure the efficiency of teachers. Effective continuing professional development, as reported by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD, 2009), in which the Kingdom of Bahrain has membership, includes training, practice and feedback, and provides sufficient time for follow-up and support to teachers. Successful programs provide teachers with learning activities that are similar to those they will use with their students in classrooms and encourage the development of continuing learning communities for teachers. Centralization of educational systems led many countries to create teachers’
Show more

6 Read more

Rethinking Education – Emerging Roles for Teachers

Rethinking Education – Emerging Roles for Teachers

Abstract The purpose of the study was to find out how teachers role modeled and taught empathetic and pro-social skills at the primary level. The study was qualitative in nature and followed a case study approach. Observations of regular English language classes were done from Grades 1-5 to see if class lessons incorporated the said themes and whether teachers displayed the stated skills in classrooms. Another set of observations were conducted after teachers were requested to highlight empathetic and pro-social themes in texts and activities. The second set of observations noticed if the use of empathetic and pro-social textual materials and activities raised awareness among students about the said themes and affected student interest and teacher behaviour in any way. Teachers were also interviewed to register their thoughts on their own empathetic and pro-social behaviours and their experience of teaching the same in classrooms. The deputy curriculum developer from Grades 1-5 was also interviewed to take her opinion about teachers as appropriate role models to teach the said skills and the time given to the development of such skills in the professional development programmes. The findings established teachers as weak role models for the demonstration of empathetic and pro-social skills in classrooms. However, they successfully incorporated and taught the same skills through texts. The paper encourages teachers to exhibit more empathetic and compassionate skills in classrooms so that students can be equipped with sound academic and affective skills for a more positive assimilation in society at large.
Show more

12 Read more

Shaping the future for primary care education and training project  Best practise in education and training strategies for integrated health and social care: a benchmarking tool

Shaping the future for primary care education and training project Best practise in education and training strategies for integrated health and social care: a benchmarking tool

This tool has been designed to encourage the systematic evaluation of current services offered in your organisation in relation to education and training. The aim of the benchmarking process is to enable your organisation to judge its ability in six domains: team working, communication, role awareness, personal and professional development, practice development and leadership and team working. Associated with each domain are a set of key questions you should ask about your services in relation to evidence- based ‘best practice’. ‘Best’ practice has been identified and summarised through a systematic review of the literature and through consultation with services users and professionals.
Show more

35 Read more

A CRITIQUE OF CONTINUOUS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND INSERVICING OF TEACHERS

A CRITIQUE OF CONTINUOUS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND INSERVICING OF TEACHERS

Teachers are undoubtedly the greatest assets of any school. They transmit knowledge, skills and values to pupils. In order for teachers to fulfill these functions fully there is need to prepare them thoroughly for their work and to help them maintain and improve their contributions through continuous professional development. In addition, teachers operate in environments that are unstable due to the rapid changes in information and technology. The times when teachers relied solely on their initial teacher training are over and done with. The technological advances demand that teachers upgrade their skills and knowledge in order to remain effective. The explosion of information and knowledge has resulted in situations where teachers are n longer the main sources of information and knowledge. Children learn from many sources as television, internet and computers. Teachers are duty bound to advance their own knowledge and skills in order to cope with situations where pupils may be more up to date than they are. What are the implications of all these changes on teachers and other educators? This presentation will discuss continuous professional development, in-service education and teacher education. It will also discuss the role of distance education in general and, in particular, the role of the Zimbabwe Open University in the whole field of teachers’ continuous development and in-service education.
Show more

5 Read more

Mentorship and pursuit of academic medicine careers: a mixed methods study of residents from diverse backgrounds

Mentorship and pursuit of academic medicine careers: a mixed methods study of residents from diverse backgrounds

mentors outside of their home department or institution. Medical professional organizations (e.g. NMA, NHMA) and professional development seminars may provide op- portunities to identify new mentors. Additionally, resi- dency programs that lack racial and ethnic faculty diversity should consider engaging faculty in other de- partments, from institutional leadership, or from the National Center on Minority Health and Health Dispar- ities Centers of Excellence. An added benefit of this ap- proach is that residents will gain exposure and network with faculty from outside their departments, which may heighten their visibility and enhance opportunities to serve in leadership roles. A potential limitation is the willingness and ability of one department to compensate the efforts (monetarily and with protected time) of fac- ulty members from another department. Creative solu- tions and additional resources are needed to increase interdepartmental and intra-institutional cooperation for mentoring programs.
Show more

8 Read more

Role of MOOCs in Pakistani English Teachers’ Professional Development

Role of MOOCs in Pakistani English Teachers’ Professional Development

Teachers’ professional development is a major concern for educational institutions all over the world. However, getting professional development opportunities on a continuous basis to keep one self up-to-date and motivated is really challenging. MOOCs provide one such opportunity for continuing professional development for teachers on a mass level (Misra, 2018). MOOCs have the potential to not only help for standardized and site based learning but also for self-directed professional development of teachers (Gaible &Burns, 2005). Thus MOOCs can dramatically redirect teachers’ professional development in future through capacity building and skill development (Richards, 2014). Dikke and Faltin in their 2015 study found 130 MOOCs available online about teachers’ professional development. They were mostly is English and Spanish languages encompassing teaching skills including language teaching, science teaching, use of ICT in classrooms and soft skills (Dikke & Faltin, 2015). The growing increase of MOOCs for professional development determines their effectiveness for CPD as they provide a solution to cost and time related problems teachers face for professional development otherwise (Marquis, 2013). MOOCs can help teacher improve their teaching by observing other teachers teach, joining discussion boards, going through a student feel online, learn anew in a structured manner and avail appropriate resources free of cost (Bali, 2013). Therefore a combination of MOOCs and professional development is a win-win situation altogether (Jobe, Ostlund & Svensson, 2014).
Show more

23 Read more

What Works? Principals' Perceptions of Professional Development.

What Works? Principals' Perceptions of Professional Development.

There is considerable agreement among researchers that the role of collaboration is valuable when educators focus on teaching and its effects (Elmore & Burney, 1999; Hawley & Valli, 1999; Little, 1999; Blase & Blase, 1998; Lieberman & Miller, 1999). Professional growth can occur as a result of research, conferences, books, workshops, etc. But growth can also result from gaining ideas and perspectives from colleagues (Lieberman & Miller, 1999). One example provided by Blase and Blase is teachers sharing information and providing demonstrations of skills and new knowledge acquired at off-site workshops or conferences. The process benefits both the participants and the presenter. Participants learn new skills and the very act of teaching others solidifies the knowledge of the teacher-presenter. Other examples of encouraging collaboration include the formation of study groups, common planning time among grade levels or departments, common planning time with multi-grades and subject areas, collaborative decision-making processes, informal conversations focused on student learning, and peer observations. Collaboration allows teachers to focus on their immediate needs and concerns about teaching and learning.
Show more

238 Read more

Evaluation (and related activities) of a NHS supported local delivery model for non credit bearing Multi professional Support for Learning and Assessment in Practice in Greater Manchester

Evaluation (and related activities) of a NHS supported local delivery model for non credit bearing Multi professional Support for Learning and Assessment in Practice in Greater Manchester

UoB recognise that there may need to be a different delivery model whereby the university teach with the smaller PEF in the Trusts but there will be an associated cost attached to this delivery model. Whilst not impacting on students (module evaluations are good), in interviews, PEFs feel that they are not up to date with innovative pedagogies Whilst there is evidence how the Professional Education Lead at UHSM is supporting PEFs with the Post Graduate Certificate in Education, the 2016-2017 Programme Plan UHSM does not include any actions that provide the reassurance that PEFs continuing professional development needs will be met in the future. The need to maintain academic currency and credibility though continuing professional development is very clearly set out within the NMC standards and there is a need to ensure this is adhered to. This is a significant challenge for the PEF because direct teaching is not traditionally part of their core role and seems very different to the main focus of their existing job description. The implications and impact on future PEF recruitment who are not comfortable with the delivery and assessment of the programme but have a desire to work within the PEF role requires consideration.
Show more

91 Read more

Population health intervention research training: the value of public health internships and mentorship

Population health intervention research training: the value of public health internships and mentorship

Nevertheless, many trainees mentioned they had less than perfect public health in- ternships and mentorship experiences in both exit (about 12 out of 33 trainees since 2009) and telephone interviews (about 7 out of 18; sample of trainees since 2003). For example, trainees said: “my mentor was not available” (EI-19; TI-T3; TI-T14; TI-T16); “It was difficult to establish a good mentoring relationship with my mentor” (EI-19); “I don ’ t think my mentor understood her role ” (EI-27); “ My research topic was not a pri- ority for the PHO. I didn ’ t work with the mentor ’ s team. As a result, I couldn ’ t develop my skills in collaborative research as I expected” (EI-13); “My mentor’s team was dy- namic but there was no opportunity to exchange with other research teams” (EI-06). In telephone interviews, one trainee explained that her/his internship fell short of her/his expectations for a number of reasons: she/he was not asked by her/his mentor to par- ticipate in regular team meetings, there were no real opportunities to develop collab- orative projects, and no opportunity to be integrated as a full researcher in a PHO after her/his placement (TI-T3).
Show more

13 Read more

Mentoring trainee music teachers

Mentoring trainee music teachers

1998b Mentor pedagogy and student teacher professional development: a study of two mentoring relationships, Teaching and Teacher Education, 146,657-670.. 2000 Mentorship: the meaning oft[r]

372 Read more

PubMedCentral-PMC5835967.pdf

PubMedCentral-PMC5835967.pdf

Although this program has been focused on enhancing mentoring in geriatric nursing, the structure of the program and lessons learned are equally applicable to other areas of nursing as well as other health care fields, including but not limited to medicine; pharmacy; social work; and physical, occupational, and speech therapies. There is a clear need across health care disciplines to provide both vertical and lateral peer mentoring. By providing lateral mentoring that crosses institutional boundaries, individuals early in their academic career are provided opportunities to expand their networks, be exposed to a diversity of thought and methodology, and become aware of different career opportunities and/or collaborations. These types of programs can potentially be set up through specialty societies, professional education organizations, consortiums of schools (similar to the NHCGNE), or other like- minded organizations. Furthermore, although there is some manpower required for setting up the programs and hosting them, there are limited costs associated with the programs themselves as the mentors and mentees are all volunteers. The only significant costs incurred by the all-volunteer Peer Mentoring Committee are related to: (a) committee conference call costs, (b) webinars, which are held initially to introduce individuals to the program and at least quarterly thereafter for peer mentors to improve their mentoring capabilities, and (c) copies of mentor materials such as the book, The Growth and Development of Nurse Leaders (McBride, 2011), the program has distributed to each peer mentor to use both personally and to assist them in their role as a peer mentor.
Show more

13 Read more

7-21-2011 12:00 AM The role of reflection in audiology students’ development as professional practitioners: A constructivist grounded theory

7-21-2011 12:00 AM The role of reflection in audiology students’ development as professional practitioners: A constructivist grounded theory

It can be difficult for new practitioners to balance the needs of their clients with the needs of the organization for which they work. Personal beliefs, professional values, and espoused theories may at times clash with reality. These challenges are related to Section 4.3.5. In the example below, a new practitioner discusses the need to balance her professional values with the reality of her work situation: The system I am currently working is a private-practice model. I enjoy the full spectrum of clients that I get to work with. I also get to see the patient from the initial assessment straight through to receiving hearing aids and any follow-up. This part of private practice I enjoy – watching the client move through all these stages. The downside of this model however, is the focus on sales. I am not a saleswoman and find it very hard sometimes to put that hat on. This is one aspect of the profession that I am still trying to find balance in. I want to provide help for my clients in any way possible and provide them with the best care but also deal with the business end of things and sell enough hearing aids to ensure my position (1010-3).
Show more

265 Read more

The Role and Functions of the Implementation Committee of the School in Improving the  Quality of Education

The Role and Functions of the Implementation Committee of the School in Improving the Quality of Education

Education quality improvement efforts in particular in Parepare Town, then the expected presence of an education professional management setup by doing the following things: (1) improving the leadership of the principal as a major element in the management of quality improvement, (2) increased the ability and professionalism of employee administration education, (3) restructuring system of budgeting and financing schools, (4) restructuring management system and program activities, development projects (5) renewal and the establishment of the educational system, (6) empowering educational institutions and increased participation of families and communities, (7) enhancing the quality of educational institutions, (8) to improve the quality of human resources, integrated directional and thorough. Result observation of keterlaksaan the role of the School Committee, occur in the field compared to a standard which should have as a criterion for determining the success of (Ali Mustadi, Zubaidah, SumardiKymee♥, 2016:1).
Show more

9 Read more

Professional School Counselors' Development of Advocacy Competencies.

Professional School Counselors' Development of Advocacy Competencies.

Singh, Urbano, Haston, and McMahon (2010) constructed a grounded theory for school counselor advocacy. Using semi-structured interviews, the study focused on ―the experiences of school counselors in enacting change, as well as on the strategies they used as advocates‖ (Singh et al., 2010, p. 137). Seven strategies participants used as advocates were identified. The strategies included ―(a) using political savvy to navigate power structures, (b) consciousness raising, (c) initiating difficult dialogs, (d) building intentional relationships, (e) teaching students self-advocacy skills, (f) using data for marketing, and (g) educating others about the school counselor role of advocate‖ (p. 138). The investigators provided
Show more

115 Read more

The Role of Practicum and Intern Supervisees in Professional Identity Development

The Role of Practicum and Intern Supervisees in Professional Identity Development

Becoming a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) is another form of certification and way of establishing a professional counselor identity according to Pistole and Roberts (2002). There are more than 90,000 LPC’s in 48 states and the District of Columbia (ACA, 2007). In order for counselors to become licensed, they must meet state licensure requirements which typically, but not exclusively include a master’s or doctoral degree in counseling from a national or regionally-accredited institution of higher education. Licensure requires an internship and coursework on human behavior and development, effective counseling strategies, ethical practice, and other core knowledge areas. Also, a completion of a minimum of 3,000 hours of post-master’s supervised clinical experience, performed within two years, and periodic
Show more

182 Read more

Psychological Defense and Safety in the Context of Development of Student’s Professional Strategy

Psychological Defense and Safety in the Context of Development of Student’s Professional Strategy

However, everything changes significantly when applies to psychological safety. It is caused by the fact that one and the same life situation can constructively or destructively affect the psychological safety of direct or indirect participants of the particular event "depending on its reflection, arising experiences, ratio of mental and emotional dominants, further operational or delayed interpretation" (Vardanyan Y. & Vardanyan L., 2013, p. 92). In a situation of collision with psychological threat the human mind automatically runs mechanisms of psychological defense which can temporarily neutralize or minimize this threat. Consequently, psychological defense can be falsely attributed to the factors contributing to the enhancement of psychological safety. In reality psychological defense, which consists of the unconscious regulatory mechanisms, performs dual role toward psychological safety. On the one hand, it allows “to maintain the stability of the personality on the background of destabilizing experiences and achieve a more or less successful adaptation” protecting the psyche from painful feelings and memories, on the other hand – “deprives a person of the possibility to influence the situation actively and eliminate the source of experiences 22 (Great …, 2005, p. 173). All this can
Show more

8 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...