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Railway Transportation of Dangerous Goods: a Bibliometric Aspect

Railway Transportation of Dangerous Goods: a Bibliometric Aspect

2 Self-Employed, West Hartford, Connecticut, USA 3 Dnipro National University of Railway Transport   named after Academician V. Lazaryan, Department of Economics and Management, Dnipro, Ukraine Abstract. The purpose of this paper is to research and define the promising worldwide scientific trends in the field of railway transportation of various dangerous goods. To obtain relevant empirical data, the authors reviewed the world literature on paper topic using Scopus and Web of Science citation bases. We determined that this research was focused on several major thematic areas: 1) automation and telematics systems; 2) navigation systems; 3) logistics; 4) energy; 5) locomotives; 6) freight cars; 7) materials; 8) rails; 9) impact on the environment and people. The article used mapping, ensuring a visual perspective for researchers and helping to understand general situations in specific subject areas of the research. This study provides useful information concerning the development of the field of research for the railway transportation of dangerous goods, identifying those academics (authors, countries and institutions) that have made the greatest contribution to its development and defining the priority research directions
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Technological and economic estimation of efficiency of a route choice for transportation of dangerous goods

Technological and economic estimation of efficiency of a route choice for transportation of dangerous goods

The transport industry needs accelerated development in the current competitive conditions during the transition to market relations. Improving the service quality is one of the key conditions that affect the level of demand for transport services. Railway transport has a leading position in the transport system and is the main carrier of goods. Transportation of dangerous goods (DG) takes an important place in railway transportation; thus, it should be not only prompt, but also safe, while complying with high international standards, since emergency situations with trains which include cars with DG always have more severe consequences, which in turn leads to heavier material damage.
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A comparative study on liability issues concerning maritime transportation of dangerous goods: International and Chinese perspectives

A comparative study on liability issues concerning maritime transportation of dangerous goods: International and Chinese perspectives

One aspect of the present theme of enquiry is - what are these dangerous goods that instigate the kinds of damage mentioned above? This work concerns those goods or substances that fall within the description and meaning of “dangerous” in the maritime context. Oil is carried on board ships both as cargo as well as fuel. There are different grades of cargo oil whose deleterious effects as pollutants are different depending on such factors as density, viscosity, inflammability, etc. Fuel oil is also of different grades and blends; some containing more carbon and lead than others. Chemicals, usually always carried as cargo, are of numerous varieties; some as liquids, others as solids. There are also gas carriers carrying liquid natural gas (LNG) or liquid petroleum gas (LPG) as cargo; as well, there are now LNG-fuelled ships. Nuclear ships are those that are nuclear powered; they may or may not carry nuclear materials as cargo. Chemical carriers, gas carriers and nuclear ships are specially designed vessels as are oil tankers. Hence these are all known as "purpose-built" ships.
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REFLEXIONS TRANSPORTATION SAFETY. Derailments, collisions and dangerous goods. Issue 20 Winter Transportation Safety Board of Canada

REFLEXIONS TRANSPORTATION SAFETY. Derailments, collisions and dangerous goods. Issue 20 Winter Transportation Safety Board of Canada

Alternative train handling methods were available to the locomotive engineer. If selected, they would have ensured safe operation of the train at this location. The train speed could have been reduced earlier, permitting a reduction in DB as the head end of the train traversed the crossover, as suggested by known industry best practices. Train automatic air brakes could have been used alone, with- out DB. This method is also an accepted railway practice in slowing trains in cresting grade situations. The railway’s train handling instructions, however, do not encourage the use of DB as the primary brak- ing force. A heavy application of DB made in attempt to control the train’s speed as it traversed the crossover – when there were long-wheel base empty cars close to the locomotives, with 90 per cent of the train’s tonnage trailing on a descending grade – was inappropriate for the conditions and operating requirements at that location.
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Legal Framework for the Transportation of Dangerous Goods in Kosovo

Legal Framework for the Transportation of Dangerous Goods in Kosovo

Whenever the personnel of the carrier accept shipments for transport of the dangerous goods, provided by the rules of the Regulation on the international transport of dangerous goods by railway (RID), before signing the contract for transport, the personnel of the carrier are obliged to request from the consignor the documentation that is attached together with the consignment note, which is scheduled for that kind of transport. Security adviser of the transport of dangerous goods is a trained and certified person, assigned by the entity, whose activity includes transportation, by road or railway, packaging, loading, filling or unloading of the dangerous goods, whose role is to carry out the duties and the fulfilment of functions to prevent risks, from such activity, to people, property and the environment.
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Quantitative operational risk analysis for dangerous goods transportation through cut and cover road tunnels

Quantitative operational risk analysis for dangerous goods transportation through cut and cover road tunnels

The aim of this work was to explore a particular case where dangerous goods have to pass through typical cut and cover road tunnels. The question explored was whether dividing a long tunnel into three shorter sections at the conceptual design stage would affect the overall safety. Early decisions in the geometrical characteristics of a tunnel would affect its overall safety during its whole life cycle and therefore the research question is of outmost importance in the early stages of such a construction project. In order to conclude, quantitative risk analysis tools and specifically the OECD /PIARC QRA Model was used to perform the risk analysis of the cases examined. The overall safety of the first alternative (one long tunnel - route L) was compared to the other alternative of its division into three shorter tunnels (route S) for three different cases. According to the calculations of the model, ‘cutting’ the tunnel into three shorter sections leads always to a safer state. However, the difference in the Expected Value of the risk as well as the comparison of the F/N curves for all the cases
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Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

Non-rapidly or rapidly degradable substance for which there are adequate chronic toxicity data available OR in the absence of chronic toxicity data, Acute toxicity estimate (based on i[r]

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DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTATION: A

DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTATION: A

Thus, the need arises for a system that will allow the necessary movement of Dangerous Goods in a manner that will not place unnecessary risks to society. Specifically, the actors involved (such as Dangerous Goods transporters, infrastructure operators, etc.) have so far implemented measures to mitigate such problems and deficiencies, but are lacking a global policy, an effective integrated technical infrastructure and the possibility of enforcement. As a result, the measures employed are limited in scope and can even be unfair to particular population groups. For example, a major highway or tunnel operator may wish to protect the other users of its infrastructure and the infrastructure itself by sending DGVs over high mountain roads, which however may pass through villages or other populated areas, inequitably exposing them to risks. GOOD ROUTE’s answer to this need has been the development of a prototype cooperative system for dangerous goods vehicle routing, monitoring, re-routing (in case of need), enforcement and driver support, based upon dynamic, real time data, aiming to minimise the Societal Risks related to their movements, while still generating the most cost efficient solution for all actors involved. It has achieved to do so via the use of real time infrastructure information, detailed and accurate knowledge of the materials being transported and the vehicles transporting them, on-board sensors, and V2I/V2V communications advanced routing algorithms which calculate and take into account transport risks as well as economic parameters, enabling in this way DGVs to reach their destinations efficiently and safely, without imparting unnecessary risks to the human populace in the vicinity of their trajectories. Risk distribution equity has been an explicit element of the system, as is the incorporation of enforcement capabilities.
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Vulnerability and Resilience of the Territory Concerning Risk of Dangerous Goods Transportation (DGT): Proposal of a Spatial Model

Vulnerability and Resilience of the Territory Concerning Risk of Dangerous Goods Transportation (DGT): Proposal of a Spatial Model

The definition of the vulnerability levels is based on the decree of September 2005 the 29 th , supervised by the Directive n ° 96/82 of 09 of December 1996 on the control of major accidents involving dangerous substances, that defines classes of our vulnerability index. This decree establishes the severity of an accident involving a dangerous substance according to its human consequences. Table 1 presents the characterization of a disaster in terms of casualties. According to this scale of severity, we propose five levels of vulnerability in order to characterize the vulnerability of a territory.
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HS404 Dangerous Goods Storage Guideline

HS404 Dangerous Goods Storage Guideline

Note: If dangerous goods have both primary and subsidiary risks then store in accordance with primary risk. For example Acetic acid has a primary risk- corrosive and a subsidiary risk -flammable. It should be stored in with corrosives. However in this case you also need to ensure that ignition sources are far enough away not to present a risk. For the substances in this class that are scheduled poisons, generally the same controls for toxics work for poisons. However refer to the HS331 Procedure for Schedule 4 and 8 drugs if you are using substances from this schedule. You will need a permit from the Department of Health and be required to keep a log of every use of the substance (in the same way as the pharmacists have to for prescription drugs).
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Hazardous, NON-Dangerous Goods

Hazardous, NON-Dangerous Goods

STEL (Short Term Exposure Limit) - the average airborne concentration over a 15 minute period which should not be exceeded at any time during a normal eight-hour workday. These Exposure Standards are guides to be used in the control of occupational health hazards. All atmospheric contamination should be kept to as low a level as is workable. These exposure standards should not be used as fine dividing lines between safe and dangerous concentrations of chemicals. They are not a measure of relative toxicity.

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DANGEROUS GOODS INSPECTORS HANDBOOK

DANGEROUS GOODS INSPECTORS HANDBOOK

3.1 The Seconded Dangerous Goods Inspectors shall periodically carry out inspection of aircraft/airport operators, shippers/freight forwarders and cargo terminals/ warehouses etc. to ensure that the requirements in respect of transportation of dangerous goods such as packing, marking, labelling, documentation and handling etc. as laid down in the Aircraft (Carriage of Dangerous Goods) Rules, 2003 are being complied with. In addition, spot checks may also be conducted as and when considered necessary. 3.2 During inspection, the following points, amongst others, may be checked:-
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Transporting Dangerous Goods Safely

Transporting Dangerous Goods Safely

The IMDG Code introduced segregation groups which list substances with similar properties. In addition to the general segregation requirements by Class or Division, the IMDG may specify addition segregation requirements for specific dangerous goods. The additional segregation requirements are specified in the list of dangerous goods (part 3 of the IMDG). Cyanides of division 6.1 must be segregated ‘away from acids’. Acids refer to any substance in the ‘Acid Segregation Group’. Note: The ‘away from acids’ does not apply to all acids; it applies only to those listed in the Acid Segregation Group. Many weaker organic acids are not included in the Acid Segregation Group. The Segregation Groups have been reproduced in NZS 5433:2007
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STORAGE AND HANDLING OF DANGEROUS GOODS

STORAGE AND HANDLING OF DANGEROUS GOODS

draining spilled liquids to an underground sump or tank, or to an external pit, avoids the access problems associated with bunds. However, the drain network, pit, tank or sump themselves become a potential source of hazards. Possible incompatibility of goods drained to the sump should be included in the risk assessment. design needs to be to a suitable standard. underground or covered sumps or pits should be designed to the standards for underground tanks. Generally, each such containment system should be exclusively for the effluent from one store or work area, unless all the dangerous goods or combustible liquids are compatible and effective provision is made to prevent flashback through drain pipes.
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Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

Not classified as Dangerous Goods by the criteria of the "Australian Code for the Transport of Dangerous Goods by Road & Rail" and the "New Zealand NZS5433: Transport of[r]

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Research of dangerous goods flows by rail

Research of dangerous goods flows by rail

1.1.2. Tarptautinis jūra gabenamų pavojingų krovinių kodeksas (IMDG KODEKSAS) IMDG (angl. International Maritime Dangerous Goods) kodeksas reglamentuoja pavojingų krovinių gabenimo jūros transportu taisykles. IMDG kodeksas taip pat, kaip ir RID taisyklės, sudarytas iš 7 skyrių. Vieno reiso metu gali būti taikomas IMDG kodeksas arba Supratimo memorandumas. Uostuose laikomasi vietinių saugos taisyklių. Ro-ro tipo laivais, kuriems pagal 7 straipsnį buvo išduotas atitikties pažymėjimas, vienu metu galima vežti ir krovininio transporto vienetus, ir krovinių vienetus su pavojingais kroviniais, kurių pakrovimas atitinka RID/ADR reikalavimus arba IMDG kodekso reikalavimus [17].
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Dangerous Goods Spill Response Plan. Acknowledgements

Dangerous Goods Spill Response Plan. Acknowledgements

Dangerous Goods Spill Response Plan waters, and to ensure safe human use of fish. The Minister of the Environment administers the pollution prevention provisions of the Fisheries Act. According to the Act, if a deposit of a deleterious substance into waters frequented by fish occurs, or if there is any damage or danger to fish or fish habitat, the responsible party must report the occurrence to an inspector. The “responsible party” includes any person who owns or has control over the deleterious substance or any person who caused or contributed to the deposit.

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NON-Hazardous Chemical, NON-Dangerous Goods

NON-Hazardous Chemical, NON-Dangerous Goods

Based on available information, this material is not classified as hazardous according to criteria of Safe Work Australia.. Prevention Precautionary Statements.[r]

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NON-Hazardous Chemical, NON-Dangerous Goods

NON-Hazardous Chemical, NON-Dangerous Goods

Flammability Limits (%): Not available Autoignition Temperature (°C): Not available Melting Point/Range (°C): Not available Pour Point/Range (°C): Not available Boiling Point/Range[r]

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Hazardous Substance, Dangerous Goods CAUSTIC SODA

Hazardous Substance, Dangerous Goods CAUSTIC SODA

Segregation Dangerous Goods: Not to be loaded with explosives (Class 1), dangerous when wet substances (Class 4.3), oxidising agents (Class 5.1), organic peroxides (Class 5.2), radioactive substances (Class 7) or food and food packaging in any quantity. Note 1: Concentrated strong alkalis are incompatible with concentrated strong acids. Note 2: Concentrated strong acids are incompatible with concentrated strong alkalis. Note 3: Acids are incompatible with Dangerous Goods of Class 6 which are cyanides. Exemptions may apply.

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