Top PDF Rearrangement of allylic alcohols

Rearrangement of allylic alcohols

Rearrangement of allylic alcohols

and complex taking are Three been discussed previously: XXXI of to to XXXVII to give XXXII, the and The XXXII present will compounds and oligomer The fourth dimeric a substance, arising [r]

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Iridium(I) hydroxides in catalysis : rearrangement of allylic alcohols to ketones

Iridium(I) hydroxides in catalysis : rearrangement of allylic alcohols to ketones

intermediate that could then isomerise; directly attaching the substrate to the catalyst in this way would promote the reaction by rendering subsequent steps where the catalyst and substrate interact intramolecular in nature. Attempts were made to trap this initial alkoxide species, but with little success. 1:1 mixtures of substrate and hydroxide rarely led to reaction at room temperature, despite the demonstrated ability of the hydroxide complex to react with a range of acidic protons. 13 The application of heat led to the allylic alcohol isomerisation reaction taking place. The reaction of the iridium(I) hydroxide complex with 1 equiv. cyclohex-2-en-1-ol at room temperature led to a 1:1 mixture of iridium(I) hydroxide and an unknown species, as determined by the presence of 1 H NMR signals corresponding to the I i Pr NHC in a different environment. No signals corresponding to iridium hydride species were observed on the 1 H NMR spectrum. Unfortunately, this new species could not be isolated, although the addition of degassed water led to isolation of only the Ir(I i Pr) hydroxide . Our hypothesis at this stage is that the deprotonation, while feasible, is slow and disfavoured, and that heating is necessary to overcome the subsequent barriers in the catalytic cycle.
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1,3 Transposition of Allylic Alcohols Catalyzed by Methyltrioxorhenium

1,3 Transposition of Allylic Alcohols Catalyzed by Methyltrioxorhenium

portant technique to supplement the formation of carbon - carbon bonds and the interconversion of func- tional groups, which constitute the substance of much synthetic work. We shall address here a rearrangement of allylic alcohols that converts one isomer to another, related by a 1,3-transposition of the OH group. The conversion can be complete or partial, depending on the spontaneity of the reaction. Such rearrangements do not occur on their own, however, and the role played by a particular catalyst is of considerable fundamental interest. The utility of this transposition arises when the more readily accessible allylic alcohol is not the desired one. A chemical equation for the general case, ignoring issues of regioselectivity to be addressed later, is given in eq 1.
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Redox-active tetrathiafulvalene and dithiolene compounds derived from allylic 1,4-diol rearrangement products of disubstituted 1,3-dithiole derivatives

Redox-active tetrathiafulvalene and dithiolene compounds derived from allylic 1,4-diol rearrangement products of disubstituted 1,3-dithiole derivatives

However, one cannot assume that the mechanism is Pinacol-type. Saturated 1,4- diols favour the formation of tetrahydrofuran derivatives, whilst allylic cations will involve some degree of stabilisation through hyperconjugation and delocalisation of positive charge, which could complicate the Pinacol mechanism. Related reactions of allylic alcohols are not unknown: periodic acid has been shown to oxidise one of the alcohol groups in a 1,4-diol fragment to the corresponding aldehyde, with no further change to the remnant allylic alcohol[10]; a related mechanism has been reported for a self-coupling intermolecular reaction, which involves the reactivity of an intermediate allylic cation generated under acidic conditions from an electron-rich thiophenemethanol derivative, but there is no intramolecular rearrangement[11]. Also worth noting, is a recent study on cationic 1,4-aryl migration observed during reactions of vinylidenecyclopropanes with electron-rich bis(p- alkoxyphenyl)methanols[12].
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Catalytic stereoselective [2,3] rearrangement reactions

Catalytic stereoselective [2,3] rearrangement reactions

chiral rhodium catalyst promotes oxonium ylide formation followed by enantioselective [2,3]-rearrangement. Heating product 47 in a sealed-tube promotes an oxy-Cope rearrangement followed by tautomerization, and an intramolecular ene cyclization to form substituted cyclopentane 51 containing four contiguous stereocenters in high diastereo- and enantioselectivity (Scheme 11a). Although racemic allylic alcohols can be utilized in this reaction, higher enantioselectivity was obtained using enantiomerically pure allylic alcohols and a matched chiral rhodium catalyst. 15b The process was applicable to a variety of substituted allylic alcohols, forming functionalized cyclopentanes in high yields and excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity in all cases. Introducing a C(3) methyl substituent onto the allylic alcohol alters the reaction pathway, with a type II-ene cyclization favored to form cyclohexane products containing an exocyclic alkene substituent and four stereogenic centres. 16 For example, the rhodium catalyzed reaction of 38 with allylic alcohol 52 followed by heating in heptane results in the formation of substituted cyclohexane 53 in 67% yield as a single diastereoisomer in 99% ee (Scheme 11b). This domino reaction sequence was applicable to a range of α-alkenyl diazo compounds and substituted allylic alcohols, forming the products in excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity. Cyclic allylic alcohols, including a monoterpenoid derived substrate, could also be utilized to generate a series of structurally complex fused-bicyclic products with high diastereoselectivity.
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Claisen and Intermolecular Rearrangement of Cinnamyloxynaphthalenes

Claisen and Intermolecular Rearrangement of Cinnamyloxynaphthalenes

Indeed the known intermolecular rearrangement of COB is a reaction which proceeds via the cinnamyl cation [6], and is governed by the thermodynamic stabi- lity of the cation and phenoxy anion. In this work, if such an intermolecular reaction for 2-CON occurs, the 2- naphthoxy anion should be formed. The activation ener- gies of the COB and 2-CON dissociations should be not significantly different because the stabilities of both the phenoxy anion and naphthoxy anion are similar. There- fore, the intermolecular rearrangement reactivities of COB

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Catalytic and selective transition metal mediated isomerisations of allylic alkoxides to enolates

Catalytic and selective transition metal mediated isomerisations of allylic alkoxides to enolates

A possible clue to the problem could rest with elucidating the mechanism through which the isom érisation process is thought to proceed (Figure 68, 69). If the isomérisation was operating via m etal-hydride addition and elim ination, then the enantioselective step would be the first step when the m etal-hydride adds across the prochiral olefin in the allylic moiety. The second step would be elim ination to reform the m etai-hydride and to generate the enoiate product. The reversible nature of this m echanistic pathway is such that the metal-hydride may add and then elim inate several tim es on the same substrate molecule during the course of the reaction. The result is a decrease in the enantioselective capability of the chiral nickel cataiyst. 7 i-A ilyl and enone m echanism s (See Figures 142 and 143) are more likely to ,offer asym m etric induction due to the greater binding and rigidity of the substrate-catalyst interm ediates during these two processes.
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Rearrangement Clustering: Pitfalls, Remedies, and Applications

Rearrangement Clustering: Pitfalls, Remedies, and Applications

In Figure 3, an example of the use of this new objective function is shown. A set of color samples are rearranged, using the intensities of their red, green, and blue components as their features. BEA finds a suboptimal solution as shown in the figure. Solving the TSP with objective (2) leads to splitting the large color cluster in half and inserting the gray color cluster in order to reduce the inter-cluster distance. Note that the color immediately above the gray cluster is very similar to the color immediately below the gray cluster, yet they are far apart in the rearrangement. Moreover, none of the gray colors separating them are nearly as similar to either of them as the two are to each other. This solution is optimal for objective (2). Restricted partitioning (RP) automatically identifies the cluster boundaries as shown in Figure 3(d). RP yields the same linear ordering as TSP+k with k = 1. The partitioning minimizes the maximum diameter of the clusters. Notice that this goal splits the gray colors between the two clusters. Finally, by using the new objective in (4) and adding a second dummy city, the inter-cluster distance is ignored and the two clusters are correctly formed as shown in Figure 3(e).
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Henry James's Hamlets: "A Free Rearrangement"

Henry James's Hamlets: "A Free Rearrangement"

In this he differs from Claudius who before the play-within-the- play is staged, wishes, as does Gertrude, that Hamlet remain at home and play the prince and heir apparent, a royal role [r]

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Rearrangement and trapping of organozinc carbenoids.

Rearrangement and trapping of organozinc carbenoids.

The suspension was heated at reflux for 22 hours and the cooled to ambient temperature and poured into saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate (500 ml).The resultant suspension was sti[r]

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Theoretical Study on Pd Catalyzed Acylation of Allylic Esters with Acylsilanes and Acylstannanes

Theoretical Study on Pd Catalyzed Acylation of Allylic Esters with Acylsilanes and Acylstannanes

Although these molecular structures are not known precisely, Pd complex such as 7 were assumed to be the active species in the catalytic cycle for the acylation with allylic ester. However, the reaction mechanism starting from 7 has not yet been investigated. We proposed the reaction mechanism from 7 as shown in Scheme 5. The O(1) atom of 7 attacks the Sn or Si atom through the transition state, TS 7-8 , to produce 8. The C(1)-C(2) reduc-

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E  coli surface display of streptavidin for directed evolution of an allylic deallylase

E coli surface display of streptavidin for directed evolution of an allylic deallylase

We evolved an articial allylic deallylase based on the biotin- streptavidin technology that catalyzes the uncaging of a uoro- genic allylcarbamate-protected coumarin 1. The reaction proceeds smoothly even at 1 mM catalyst concentration. To streamline the directed evolution protocol, we implemented an E. coli outer membrane display using the Lpp-OmpA-Sav fusion construct. Amino-acid substitutions at positions S112 and K121 lead to a twenty-one-fold improvement in normalized surface ADAse activity (i.e. Sav S112M–K121A) vs. WT. The Sav muta- tions accelerating ADAse activity on the E. coli surface also have a benecial effect on puried Sav samples in vitro yielding an up to 5.7-fold increased TON (Sav S112M–K121A) vs. WT. E. coli cells are viable aer 16 h catalysis. X-ray crystallography of ADAse double mutant S112M–K121A highlights the localization of cofactor 3 within the biotin-binding vestibule. We anticipate that this straightforward protein-display strategy can readily be extended to signicantly simplify the directed evolution of articial metalloenzymes for in vivo synthetic biology applications.
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CHAPTER 6 ALCOHOLS 6.1 NAMING OF ALCOHOLS. 2 propanol 2-butanol isopropyl alcohol rubbing alcohol

CHAPTER 6 ALCOHOLS 6.1 NAMING OF ALCOHOLS. 2 propanol 2-butanol isopropyl alcohol rubbing alcohol

The alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes are not specific for ethanol. They carry out similar reactions on other alcohols such as methanol (found in windshield wiper fluid), ethylene glycol( antifreeze), propylene glycol(RV antifreeze), and rubbing alcohol) that are sometimes imbibed on purpose or accidentally. Generally, these products are even more toxic than acetaldehyde. Poison control center data base shows 842 inquiries about methanol ingestion and 5022 inquiries about ethylene glycol poisoning.

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Ultrasonic and Viscous Behaviour of Hydroquinone in Alcohols

Ultrasonic and Viscous Behaviour of Hydroquinone in Alcohols

The solute-solvent interaction present in hydroquinone with n-propanol & iso-propanol have been studied by ultrasonic velocity, density and viscosity study. On the basis[r]

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The Oxidation of Alcohols to Aldehydes or Ketones94-102

The Oxidation of Alcohols to Aldehydes or Ketones94-102

As the catalytic conversions of primary alco- hols into aldehydes and of secondary alcohols into ketones are essential for the preparation of many key synthetic intermediates in[r]

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Tissue cohesion and the mechanics of cell rearrangement

Tissue cohesion and the mechanics of cell rearrangement

Axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) (Del Rio and Neumann, 1997) was used to determine tissue surface tensions for regions of the early gastrula, as described (Luu et al., 2011). For unknown reasons, surface tension of the ectoderm, but not of the other tissues, alternated between high and low states over the course of many months (although apparently not in a seasonal rhythm). Tissue viscosity was determined by measuring the rate of rounding up of ellipsoidal gastrula explants (Gordon et al., 1972) (for details see supplementary mathematical analyses, Section 1). To view cell rearrangement, rounding explants were slightly compressed under a coverslip to keep sufficient surface area in focus at the high magnification required. As a measure of cell size, the diameter of dissociated single cells was determined. To quantitate cell contact fluctuation, contact lengths were measured at 1 min intervals in time-lapse recordings of explants filmed under indirect illumination. Contact angles between cells were measured in cell pairs or at the periphery of tissue explants (Stirbat et al., 2013) fixed and DEVEL
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Dehydration and rearrangement studies in decahydronaphthalene systems

Dehydration and rearrangement studies in decahydronaphthalene systems

32 The absence of products resulting from elimination of the C5 proton suggests that neither transfer of the leaving group across the face of the carbonium ion in conformation 47 to capt[r]

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Glycolytic regulation of cell rearrangement in angiogenesis

Glycolytic regulation of cell rearrangement in angiogenesis

EC rearrangement depends on differential VE-cadherin- dependent intercellular adhesion and differential formation of polarized junctional cortex protrusions (referred to as ‘cortical protrusions’). These processes drive EC intercalation and depend on VEGF-Notch signalling 9 . While VEGF promotes VE-cadherin endocytosis 10 , EC motility 2 , forward–rear cell polarity 3 , weak intercellular adhesion and serrated junctions 9 , Notch signalling impairs EC rearrangement 4 by rendering cells more adhesive and by suppressing cortical protrusions, resulting in ‘straighter’ junctions 9 . EC shuffling thus requires actin remodelling 11,12 , which is highly ATP consuming 13 as it can require up to 50% of cellular ATP levels 14,15 . In ECs, glycolytic production of ATP is essential for the formation of cytoskeletal protrusions 5 and the stability of intercellular junctions 16 . In addition, endocytosis of cadherins, which determines the available cadherin levels at the plasma membrane and hence also adhesion, relies on ATP in epithelial cells 17–20 . However, it remains unknown how glycolysis regulates EC rearrangements during vessel sprouting and, in particular, whether PFKFB3-driven glycolytic production of ATP controls filopodia extension, intercellular adhesion (via an effect on VE-cadherin endocytosis), and formation of cortical protrusions during EC rearrangement.
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Rearrangement operations on unrooted phylogenetic networks

Rearrangement operations on unrooted phylogenetic networks

In this paper, we investigated basic properties of spaces of unrooted phylogenetic net- works and their metrics under the rearrangement operations NNI, PR, and TBR. We have proven connectedness and bounds on diameters for different classes of phylogenetic networks, including networks that display a particular set of trees, tree-based networks, and level-k networks. Although these parameters have been studied before for classes of rooted phylogenetic network [BLS17], this is the first paper that studies these proper- ties for classes of unrooted phylogenetic networks besides the space of all networks. A summary of our results is shown in Table 1.
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Rearrangement and Convergence in Spaces of Measurable Functions

Rearrangement and Convergence in Spaces of Measurable Functions

We recall that, if ν is a finitely additive extended real-valued set function on an algebra Ꮽ ⊆ ᏼΩ and η = ν∗ , the space L∞ Ω,Ꮽ,ν of all real-valued essentially bounded functions introd[r]

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