Top PDF Reducing teacher workload : research report into shared planning

Reducing teacher workload : research report into shared planning

Reducing teacher workload : research report into shared planning

Whilst the personal time savings associated with shared planning are often considerable in situations where a teacher devises one lesson themselves and receives several from their colleagues, a key finding of the Whitley Bay High study was that the early stages of the planning initiatives were time consuming. Even preparatory tasks such as background reading were onerous. On an individual level, many of the teachers were planning for new courses so they needed time to acquaint themselves with material that was unfamiliar to them. In addition, the groups tended to take a prolonged period to reach agreement on the fundamentals outlined in (3) above. Subsequently, where teachers were writing for colleagues who taught sets of different abilities, the provision of heavily differentiated material was especially demanding in terms of time. The problem of “overwriting” for the benefit of non- subject specialists has already been mentioned. Many staff felt the major time benefits delivered by shared planning would be most likely felt in around two years’ time. For their part, the school’s senior leaders were unequivocal in their belief that the initial investment of time would ultimately prove to be well spent and once the initial burst of planning activity was complete and curricula became more stable in the ensuing years, they expected the amount of time required for shared planning to fall very significantly.
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Reducing teacher workload : research report

Reducing teacher workload : research report

A good assessment policy is clear on how the assessment outcomes will be used. The policy should outline when it is necessary to record assessment data and when the purposes of assessment do not require data to be collected. The policy should be careful to avoid any unnecessary addition to teacher workload. (p.26) The research group agreed, in the light of this, that there was no need for staff to assess against every national curriculum objective. We wanted to identify the key objectives from each year group for staff to use to assess their pupils. This approach was intended to offer more clarity and focus about what teachers needed to assess. We also agreed that we wanted each KPI to have an expected descriptor and also a ‘depth’ descriptor. The 2014 National Curriculum calls for depth as well as breadth in the primary curriculum but our survey showed that teachers were uncertain about what depth looked like and that this was increasing their workload.
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Workload challenge research projects : overall summary

Workload challenge research projects : overall summary

3. Implementing shared planning activities across a secondary, a middle and a primary school (see Whitley Bay High School report). Middle leaders facilitated teams of teachers in planning a module of lessons by strategically delegating planning activities. Within subject areas staff decided on a focus for their work (e.g. to create a scheme of work or homework booklets) around a specific topic for a particular year group. Work that needed to be covered was then broken down into manageable chunks and allocated to different teachers. Findings suggest that, while shared planning improved the quality of planning, saved planning time and encouraged collaboration and departmental
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Collaborate, Plan and Renew : teacher workload : reducing workload and increasing confidence through curriculum planning

Collaborate, Plan and Renew : teacher workload : reducing workload and increasing confidence through curriculum planning

During the first of the days when project leaders from across the schools worked with our academic adviser, a research impact model was used to explore the difference that we anticipated making. This generated a wide range of reflections on how new subject specialist planning approaches may be helpful to class teachers. Anticipated impact outcomes that were generated in this way were listed under four headings: Curriculum planning; Continuous development; Teacher confidence; Effective learning. These can be found in Appendix 1.

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Reducing teachers’ unnecessary workload: the promise of collaborative planning

Reducing teachers’ unnecessary workload: the promise of collaborative planning

• Allocating time – we expected an impact on the quality of planning as initial teacher surveys and interviews reported that the usual 10% allocation of PPA time was often rushed, taken up with other jobs and that teachers lacked the time and space to be as creative as possible and to support children’s engagement in their learning. 1.2.4. How did you investigate the effectiveness of each approach? The research surveys and focus group questionnaires were designed with measuring the impact of each of these approaches in mind. At the end of each planning session, all attendees were required to complete a survey using an online survey platform. The survey was designed to incorporate questions regarding the effectiveness of SLEs as facilitators, the impact of working with other colleagues to plan, and the impact of the discrete and distinct allocation of time to plan with colleagues.
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Reducing teacher workload

Reducing teacher workload

‘Visible Learning into Action’ was a whole school strategy that started with Hattie’s ‘Visible Learning impact cycle’ (2016) where 15 teachers jointly reviewed the place of feedback within their teaching and impact on pupil learning. Pupils’ views were sought through interviews about marking and feedback. Teachers in each year group then designed a new feedback practice based on this evidence. FS/Year 1 increased the use of verbal feedback and minimised use of stamps and (coloured) pens. Years 2-4 used ticks, coloured pens and stamps to replace extensive written feedback; pupils were encouraged to self-edit and minimal teacher comments were made on ‘next steps’ and where work was exceptionally well done or wrong. Year 5-6 pupils used self-assessment and peer marking. Whole class generic feedback was given to help pupils edit their work. Teachers kept research journals and shared reflections of progress on marking at the start of each staff meeting. The impact differed across year groups; teachers of Years 5-6 noticed the most significant drop in marking workload and those FS/Y1 the least. Teacher reflections included:
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Eliminating unnecessary workload around planning and teaching resources. Report of the Independent Teacher Workload Review Group

Eliminating unnecessary workload around planning and teaching resources. Report of the Independent Teacher Workload Review Group

As the workload challenge showed, all parts of the education system have a role to play in reducing the unnecessary tasks that take teachers and school leaders away from their core task: improving outcomes for children. There is no single reason behind excessive workload. Government must always introduce policies with thought and planning. The accountability system must encourage good practice rather than stimulate fads. School leaders must have the confidence to reject decisions that increase burdens for their staff for little dividend. Teachers themselves must be more active in using evidence to
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Reducing teacher workload : the WOWS research project

Reducing teacher workload : the WOWS research project

• As a result of adopting the above principle, more time was freed for teachers to give the planning of lessons the status it merited. This principle was taken a step further in some schools, by allowing teachers to determine the time they need to complete the work and allowed for much more flexible lessons which often went at a better pace. One school noted: “It meant planning lessons had to be considered and time was to be given within lessons to feedback and mark work with children. The children would take more ownership, marking their own work and assessing whether they had met their learning objective and how much of the success criteria they had met, especially in writing tasks.”
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Eliminating unnecessary workload associated with data management. Report of the Independent Teacher Workload Review Group

Eliminating unnecessary workload associated with data management. Report of the Independent Teacher Workload Review Group

As the workload challenge showed, all parts of the education system have a role to play in reducing the unnecessary tasks that take teachers and school leaders away from their core task: improving outcomes for children. There is no single reason behind excessive workload. Government must always introduce policies with thought and planning. The accountability system must encourage good practice rather than stimulate fads. School leaders must have the confidence to reject decisions that increase burdens for their staff for little dividend. Teachers themselves must be more active in using evidence to
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Does Academics’ Workload Affect Research Performance?

Does Academics’ Workload Affect Research Performance?

time on research (O’Meara, et al., 2017). However, a study by Sheridan et al. (2017) found that females academics published less and awarded fewer research grants than male academics only during baseline period and no difference was observed in subsequent years of tenure. Similarly, Lee and Bozeman (2005) found that there is no difference between female and male academics when other variables were controlled. Previous studies have found inconsistent findings between the academic workload and research performance. For example, Nader, Pietschnig and Voracek (2012) found that total working hours did not predict concurrent or near-future research output even when teaching load was controlled. Meanwhile, Duze (2011), found a significant effect of workload on quality of research. Kim and Choi (2017) claim that workload pressures were directly correlated with total self-reported publications. Steenkamp and Roberts (2018) found that workload pressures faculty to seek for alternative job as against teaching and research – their findings impliedly means workloads affects research performance negatively. These contradictory findings seem to stem from different methods being used, controlling for different sets of variables, and not accurately accounting for all kinds of academic labour. Thus, the present study would provide empirical support on the existing knowledge gap.
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Successfully Planning and Executing Large-Scale Workload Migration Projects

Successfully Planning and Executing Large-Scale Workload Migration Projects

Even when fast theoretical (e.g., 10 Gbps) network speeds are available, calculations need to be made to ensure that the available bandwidth is sufficient for the amount of data that needs to be moved simultaneously. As early as possible in the project, the real available bandwidth should be determined between the source workload and the target platform, as this bandwidth will have a significant impact on the real migration speed. A good way to measure the actual available bandwidth is by using the iPerf tool. iPerf is a client-server based tool, where the server should be run on the target platform. For a VMware based target, this can be done in a small, dedicated virtual machine. The client part can then be downloaded and launched on the source workload, after which the bandwidth between source and target can be measured. PlateSpin highly recommends to measure all available bandwidth for all source to target platform network paths before the start of the actual migrations.
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The Influence of Motivation, Leadership and Perceived Workload as Intervening on Teacher Commitment

The Influence of Motivation, Leadership and Perceived Workload as Intervening on Teacher Commitment

Committed teachers are teachers who are loyal, aware, and responsible for carrying out the learning process. Commitment defined attachment, loyalty or identification (Singh & Gupta, 2015). Organizational commitment is the strength of a person towards self identification and its exposure to a particular organization. Professional commitment is defined as psychological attachment and identification of a person to his profession. (Singh & Gupta, 2015). Organizational commitment and the people within it are impacted by leadership style. In high-level education effective leadership and teacher commitment is needed to see its influence (Yahaya & Ebrahim, 2016). Second hipotesis will test about this statement. Leadership style has positive effect on commitment (H1a)
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NFER teacher voice omnibus. Research report : July 2016

NFER teacher voice omnibus. Research report : July 2016

The Department for Education (DfE) submitted a total of 23 questions to NFER which were included in the Teacher Voice Omnibus Survey and a Senior Leader Booster Survey conducted in autumn 2015. The Teacher Voice Omnibus Survey was completed online between 6th and 11th November 2015, and the Senior Leader Booster Survey was completed online and on paper between 20th November and 11th December 2015. The questions explored teachers’ and senior leaders’ views on, and strategies and activities relating to, a range of areas such as: statutory assessment; curriculum reform; accountability reforms; careers and apprenticeships; building pupils’ character, resilience and active learning; alternative provision; Prevent; physical activity; English as an
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MAKING A SHARED VISION A SHARED REALITY: THE STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS

MAKING A SHARED VISION A SHARED REALITY: THE STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS

Firstly, the group needs to decide what is going to drive the strategic plan. We have already discussed the importance of basing decisions on the teaching and learning aims of the school. It may be, then, that an education strategic plan is developed first, after which, decisions can be made about other areas in the school. The scope of the process need not be restricted to one area. All areas of operation can be examined but, at some stage in the process, priorities will have to be identified based on the outcomes of the data collection and analysis. It is important that during this setting-up phase consideration is given to strategies that will enable ownership to occur. For example, the group needs to make sure that the strategic planning process to be followed is shared with the staff and the Board of Trustees. It is probably important, even at this early stage, for the planning group to understand that, because strategic planning involves change, some people will feel threatened and that there is a real possibility that conflict may arise during the process. How this is dealt with should be a further consideration for the Planning Group.
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Report on WorkLoad Management activities

Report on WorkLoad Management activities

Creation of local POOL catalogs for dataset (Hit, Digi, PU DST) with attached or virgin META Retrieve relevant information from RefDB!. Check file access (posix or RFIO).[r]

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'The work of teacher education' final research report

'The work of teacher education' final research report

their teaching load, office space and other resources, contractual arrangements, levels of monitoring or accountability, etc. - were impacted by both local institutional and national policy-level tensions concerned with teaching in HE (and in FE, in two cases) as well as the accountability, quality assurance and regulatory constraints associated with teacher education policy in the two countries. By their own accounts, this sample of teacher educators works hard and is successful. They report multiple transition points in their professional lives and sometimes relish these transitions as ‘new challenges’. A great deal of the reward they feel from their work is from the personal and socially transformative nature of their teaching - the success of the individual student in becoming a teacher and the year-on-year 'production' of new teachers for the profession, as well as, at times, the social mobility a teaching job affords for certain groups of working class and minority ethnic students. Research and scholarship do not always figure in their accounts of their motivations to become teacher educators. For some, it is not a contractual requirement; for others, it is merely a desirable 'extra'; for others again, it is deemed important by their employing institutions but they are given little or no guidance as to how to develop their work nor the prospect of any reward for their success (perhaps other than successful
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Shared ownership and shared equity: reducing the risks of home-ownership?

Shared ownership and shared equity: reducing the risks of home-ownership?

In part this has been because of lack of demand – for instance where developers offered shared ownership products in the last recession these were bought out quickly as the economy improved. The evidence in the USA and Australia also suggests that a large market cannot be developed without government involvement. But it also suggests that this, if not a mainstream product, is for a range of household types notably older people, rather than simply a product for those unable to afford owner-occupation by any other means. If the ‘full owner-occupation at any cost and expected positive capital gains’ environment returns there is little chance of developing a sustainable market. 3 How should these products be promoted? This would need to be based on: simple schemes where the Government is not trying to achieve too many objectives at the same time; a consistent offer that is not ever-changing; and transparent explanations of the outcomes under different economic environments. The evidence of strong demand for partial ownership products comes mainly from the queues, even in the worst of the credit crunch, for shared equity products (Burgess et al, 2009; Monk, 2010). In particular shared equity mortgages on existing dwellings allowed larger households to make a choice to buy a larger unit in a poorer neighbourhood and so address issues of overcrowding. This was an option taken up especially by black and minority ethnic (BME) households in the South of England (Cho and Whitehead, 2006; Cho and Whitehead, 2010). SO is not such a valuable product from the point of view of risk in part because it has been mainly available in the form of small units on large new sites. This increases risks for the institutions as well as for purchasers. On the other hand, it enables more mixed development, which itself may reduce risk. Households must clearly understand that if capital gains are made they may pay a significant ‘interest rate’ on the equity stake. However, they gain because they achieve a range of benefits in managing their expenditures and risks more effectively – in the current environment this looks like a good buy. 4 How big is the potential market?
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Reducing systematic review workload through certainty-based screening

Reducing systematic review workload through certainty-based screening

We use a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to carry out classification of instances [18]. SVM is one of the most frequently used classifiers. It finds a hyper-plane that separates positive and negative training instances by a maximum margin boundary. We have used two different criteria to determine the next instances to be annotated (i.e., the next title and abstract to be screened manually) in the active learning cycle: Certainty and Uncertainty, both of which are compared with a baseline Random criterion. Certainty selects the next instances to be annotated by selecting those instances with the highest probability of being relevant to the review, based on the output of classifiers trained on previously annotated instances. This criterion aims to ensure that positive instances are presented for annotation as early as possible, and thus, this criterion is suitable for the purpose of reducing the bur- den. This criterion is also considered to be effective for finding good classification models on the imbalanced data since the instances effective for the classification should be close to the small number of positive examples. This Certainty criterion has been shown to be an effective method for carrying out active learning on imbalanced data sets, as demonstrated in [19]. This cri- terion, however, has a potential drawback in that it may produce a hastily generalised classifier that is biased to a limited set of posi- tive instances and misses other positive instances. Uncertainty, in contrast, selects the next instances to be annotated by finding those instances that are closest to the separating hyper-plane of the SVM classifier, i.e., the instances for which the classifier is most uncertain about whether they represent positive or negative instances. The presentation of such uncertain instances to be anno- tated aims to improve the ability of the classifier to find the best separating hyper-plane, and thus to improve its accuracy in classi- fying new instances. (Some uncertain instances may require more careful consideration in manual annotation and thus more annota- tion (screening) costs than other instances, as they are close to the boundary of being relevant or irrelevant, but we assume that all of the instances require the same annotation costs.) As a weak base- line comparison of these different instance selection methods, we also employ a method that randomly selects the next instance to be classified (Random), and this corresponds to manual screening without active learning.
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The Reducing Burglary Initiative: planning for partnership

The Reducing Burglary Initiative: planning for partnership

The police played a part in all the projects and in many cases were re g a rded, formally or inform a l l y, as the lead agency; and local authority officers were involved – at least off i c i a l l y, if not always in practice – in all but one S D P. The local authority departments that were most f requently re p resented on the partnerships were community safety and housing; but environmental health, youth services, social services, sports and re c reation and others also played a part. Other agencies involved in the p rojects included probation, schools, victim support , housing associations and neighbourhood watch. The variety of partnership working arrangements is p e rhaps unsurprising in view of the wide range of are a s t a rgeted by the SDP projects, and is consistent with the findings of previous re s e a rch (see for example Liddle and Gelsthorpe, 1994a). Taking this variety into account, the t e rm ‘partnership’ is used in a broad sense in this re p o rt : n a m e l y, to refer to a grouping of diff e rent agencies that has a formal basis to the extent that the agencies are re p resented by a management body, and are named as active partners in a policy document. Such a stru c t u re may or may not incorporate a ‘lead agency’ that has p r i m a ry responsibility for planning and implementation. Partnership working was a principle to which projects under the RBI frequently aspired. However, adherence to this principle did not automatically equate with effective planning and implementation of project activities. The quality and strength of the partnerships varied markedly, and many project managers struggled to make token partnership structures meaningful and productive. In particular, two shortcomings were frequently evident in p roject planning which limited the effectiveness of partnership:
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Machine learning algorithms for systematic review: reducing workload in a preclinical review of animal studies and reducing human screening error

Machine learning algorithms for systematic review: reducing workload in a preclinical review of animal studies and reducing human screening error

This error analysis was an initial pilot with pragmatic stopping criteria. It is likely that there are further errors in the human screened training set. A more in-depth analysis of the training dataset, investigating every in- stance where the human and machine decision were in- congruent, might identify more errors and further increase the precision and accuracy of machine learning approaches, further reducing human resources required for this stage of systematic review. We have shown here that even with minimal intervention (only assessing in- congruent records until the original human decision was correct five consecutive times), the performance of ML approaches can be substantially improved; further im- provements are likely to be less dramatic, but this is an interesting topic for future research.
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