Top PDF Report of the Non-Executive Commissioner for Children’s Services in Surrey

Report of the Non-Executive Commissioner for Children’s Services in Surrey

Report of the Non-Executive Commissioner for Children’s Services in Surrey

5. People and Leadership 5.1. The DCS recognises the depth of the challenge and has taken significant immediate action. This includes introducing a new quality and audit system overseen by external auditors; the ‘no wrong door’ approach pioneered by North Yorkshire; the ‘family safeguarding’ model introduced by Hertfordshire; a fundamental review of early help; and an analysis of the front-door by Essex. These are appropriate initiatives and have, of necessity, been coupled with an extensive change in the senior leadership team, the engagement of interim managers, the implementation of a new structure, and recruitment to the structure. The new and emerging senior management team is negotiating the difficult balance required between taking immediate action to ‘fix’ unsafe elements of the system and embedding longer-term cultural change. The DCS is fully aware of the risk of bringing in too many new ideas at once through engaging external help. However, given that Surrey has been reluctant in the past to look outside the authority for assistance, the learning culture he is seeking to develop is an appropriate and important approach. It will be important to follow on from this positive start quickly, with change processes that engage staff and make them the most important part of the improvement journey. Staff and partners told the review team that they do not yet feel involved in the analysis and solutions and are not yet clear about the way ahead and what is expected of them. This is a priority for the leadership team and an important success measure. Measures for progress are being developed but not yet understood by staff at this early stage in the improvement journey.
Show more

14 Read more

Report of the Strategic Director Children s Services to the meeting of Executive to be held on 9 January 2018

Report of the Strategic Director Children s Services to the meeting of Executive to be held on 9 January 2018

outcomes of SEND children and young people from birth to 25 years of age across the district. It is intended that the proposed SEND Inclusive Education Service will service four areas and be aligned to the proposals for four area-based teams in Prevention and Early Help. This will mean that Council services are closer to the communities which they serve, there will be a much clearer pathway for any referrals, there will be better communications and shared systems between services so they can join up their offer for children, young people and families and make them more efficient and seamless. Families, schools and other service users should be able to identify more clearly who the teams are and who they need to contact and should get a more timely response.
Show more

36 Read more

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF SURREY COUNTY COUNCIL S EDUCATION AND CHILDREN S SOCIAL CARE SERVICES 2005

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF SURREY COUNTY COUNCIL S EDUCATION AND CHILDREN S SOCIAL CARE SERVICES 2005

There has been a reduction in the numbers on the child protection register this year which is half the national average. Surrey has clear referral systems; families and children at risk are identified early and the quality of preventative support is good. All cases are now reviewed within the required timescale. All on the child protection register are allocated a named social worker and 80% of looked after children have a named qualified social worker. The authority believes there are robust supervision arrangements for the 20% of children without a qualified social worker allocated. All non-qualified staff are involved in a staff development programme that includes child protection training.
Show more

8 Read more

Commissioner s Monthly Report. October Christine Beyer Commissioner

Commissioner s Monthly Report. October Christine Beyer Commissioner

2 The definition for "Youth Open with CSOC" reflects youth who are involved and eligible to receive services through CSOC. 1 Some children may be served by both CP&P and CSOC and are over-represented in the final count of children served in the month. DCF At A Glance Dashboard CP&P

14 Read more

Children s Intensive Services (CIS) Evaluation Report

Children s Intensive Services (CIS) Evaluation Report

As specified in the standards, much of the CIS program delivery was provided outside the office, with approximately 65% of services delivered directly in the home or other non-office settings. Discharge data is encouraging, though additional follow-up will be necessary to continue monitoring program impacts. Average length of stay in the program is approximately 5 and ½ months, though time in Levels 1 through 3 is generally under 5 months. In general, children discharged from the program make significant improvements in clinical functioning, reductions in problem behavior levels, and are rated as having less severe problems on the CAFAS. The most common reason for discharge is an indication that therapeutic goals have been accomplished, though a significant number of clients discharge for other reasons, including treatment drop-out or a move from the area. Refinement of discharge tracking data was implemented in October 2005, to more accurately track reasons for discharge and the types of referrals made to clients leaving the program.
Show more

26 Read more

Children. for all Children Actions to address child poverty in New Zealand. A Fair Go. A report for the Children s Commissioner and Barnardos

Children. for all Children Actions to address child poverty in New Zealand. A Fair Go. A report for the Children s Commissioner and Barnardos

In poor communities especially, schools that are open beyond core school hours can be important community resources for reinforcing development, education and skills, and promoting social inclusion. As the physical bases for providing about half of all out-of-school services, they enable parents to access a larger range of jobs by allowing them to work longer and more flexible hours and through school holidays (also see chapter 4). They also benefit children. Maori and Pacifica children, and children in sole-parent families, are less likely to have access to computers and the Internet at home, and being able to do their homework at school can make up for this disadvantage. This was recognised in the 2000 Study Support Centre initiative, which resulted in 107 centres, located mainly within schools in deciles 1 to 3, to help students in years five to eight, and particularly to improve their access to information technology. The programme has not yet been evaluated.
Show more

80 Read more

California Children s Services Program Analysis Final Report

California Children s Services Program Analysis Final Report

We received from the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) of patient- level data pertaining to all paid CCS authorized claims, non-CCS authorized claims, and managed care encounters for fiscal years 2007 to 2009 (7/1/2006 to 6/30/2009). Claims data were abstracted from the Management Information System / Decision Support System (MIS/DSS). The datasets included demographic information, geographic information, diagnoses, procedures and reimbursement information for each claim for every eligible child. The claims dataset included all paid claims for a child and could include claims from different sources such as EDS, Department of Developmental Services, Delta Dental, CHDP etc. Since it was not possible to identify which claims were specific to the CCS eligible condition we included all claims in our analysis of utilization and only fee-for-service claims in our analysis of expenditures.
Show more

8 Read more

Engagement of students in Children s Services qualifications - final report

Engagement of students in Children s Services qualifications - final report

Quotes are used to illustrate issues raised in the interviews and focus groups points but do not necessarily reflect the distribution of responses across the different organisation types consulted. Peak organisation interview findings Interviews were undertaken with six peak body organisations that are relevant to the childcare sector in Australia. The themes coming through the peak body interviews were quite consistent and there was little in the way of opposing views. The main focus of these interviews centred on reasons for non-completion of courses and initiatives or strategies to engage or re-engage students to complete these courses. However within this context, issues relating to the childcare sector as a whole were raised as they appear to be part of the story about completion or non-completion, and the way that some initiatives need to be designed.
Show more

50 Read more

The Report of the Independent Review of Children s Cardiac Services in Bristol

The Report of the Independent Review of Children s Cardiac Services in Bristol

3.4 The Board was assured that its executive officers did not believe that levels of staffing had contributed to poor care or to poor outcomes for families, as opposed to, on occasions, a poor experience of care. This was not, however, the conclusion reached in some of these documents. The CDRs and the RCA which have been referred to painted a complex picture, but at a minimum they raised questions about the contribution of low levels of staffing, as well as the ability of staff to identify deterioration in children, to the events which occurred. It seems to us that a more thorough discussion and review of the history of concerns about staffing in Ward 32, and of the most recent investigations into deaths or untoward incidents in the ward, would have contributed to a fuller and more complete understanding of the pressures on that service and the effectiveness of the measures taken to mitigate risks. It would have led to a more qualified or nuanced discussion with the Board, and, thereafter, in the representations to the CQC. It could also have better informed communication with some of the key families concerned.
Show more

239 Read more

Information Commissioner s Office. Information Commissioner s Annual Report and Financial Statements 2015/16

Information Commissioner s Office. Information Commissioner s Annual Report and Financial Statements 2015/16

The credit for another year of high performance is shared by staff at every level of the organisation and I should like to thank everyone at the ICO for what they have done to contribute to this result. As Commissioner, I have been supported and encouraged throughout by the members of my Management Board, both non-executive and executive colleagues. Andrew Hind left the Board on 31 August 2015 on his appointment as chair of the Fundraising Standards Board. David Smith retired after over 25 years at the ICO and Graham Smith was appointed to a role with the European Ombudsman in Brussels.
Show more

92 Read more

EXECUTIVE BRIEF Health of Women and Children Report

EXECUTIVE BRIEF Health of Women and Children Report

by 2060, 2 in 3 children are projected to be a race other than non-Hispanic white. 2 The COVID-19 pandemic has had a substantial impact on individuals, families and communities across the country, while presenting unique challenges for women and children. Community leaders and advocates should leverage this year’s report as they focus on opportunities to build healthier communities that address issues caused or exacerbated by the pandemic.

16 Read more

Philosophy for children : evaluation report and executive summary

Philosophy for children : evaluation report and executive summary

The evaluation team made 30 visits to treatment schools, usually one at the beginning of the intervention and one towards the end to observe changes in teacher and pupil behaviour. Schools were visited repeatedly to assess progress. The trips included observations of the initial training of teachers as well as the delivery of the programme in the classroom. Evaluators attended three training sessions as participant observers, noting the process of implementing P4C, the methods of delivery, and also teachers’ responses to the training. The observations of P4C in action were non- intrusive, with the evaluator sitting either inconspicuously at the back of the classroom or more usually as part of a circle but not taking part in the dialogue unless directly addressed. Interviews with teachers and pupils were also conducted during these visits. These interviews were very informal conversations with teachers and pupils who were involved in doing P4C intervention. In each visit a prior meeting was set up between the P4C lead and the teaching staff to discuss the lesson to be taught that day. The evaluation team members also observed the debriefing sessions after lessons in order obtain teachers’ feedback on P4C sessions.
Show more

45 Read more

JAPAN CHILDREN S RIGHTS. Executive Summary

JAPAN CHILDREN S RIGHTS. Executive Summary

the proceedings, an attorney is required as an attendant on the juvenile side. If an attorney is not retained by the juvenile, the court must appoint an attorney as the attendant. 85 Upon completion of the social inquiry, the family court probation officer submits a report to the judge. If the judge thinks that further investigation is necessary before a determination can be made, the juvenile may be placed under the supervision of a family court probation officer. During this period of supervision, juveniles may continue to live with their parents or guardians under conditions imposed by the family court or they may be placed under a suitable institution, agency, or individual. 86 A public prosecutor may be involved in the proceedings if the family court decides that it is necessary to prove the facts, that the juvenile is over fourteen years old, and when he or she has committed crimes resulting in death with criminal intent or crimes whose statutory penalties include capital punishment or imprisonment for two years or more. 87 Provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure are applied for the investigation proceedings so far as the provisions of the Code are not at variance with the nature of juvenile proceedings. 88 The judge may set a non-public hearing. 89
Show more

9 Read more

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER S PROGRAMME

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER S PROGRAMME

92-96). UNHCR indicates that the non-compliance in 2007 could be attributed primarily to the opening of new offices that had not yet achieved MOSS compliance and to the nature of security standards, which, when changed for a country or region, could render an office non-compliant until the new measures are implemented. As indicated in the revised budget, following the bombing of the United Nations offices in Algiers, UNHCR undertook a global assessment of its offices to determine vulnerability and subsequent mitigating measures. UNHCR may issue a separate appeal for funding once the analysis is completed. The Advisory Committee is aware of the delicate balance that UNHCR faces in weighing security concerns against its operational requirements.
Show more

15 Read more

WHISTLEBLOWING TO THE CHILDREN S COMMISSIONER FOR WALES

WHISTLEBLOWING TO THE CHILDREN S COMMISSIONER FOR WALES

WHISTLEBLOWING TO THE CHILDREN’S COMMISSIONER FOR WALES 1. What does the Children’s Commissioner for Wales do? The Children's Commissioner for Wales is an independent children’s rights institution established in 2001. His principal aim is to safeguard and promote the rights and welfare of children.

6 Read more

REPORT THIS REPORT PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF THE GROUP S APPROACH TO REMUNERATION, WITH PARTICULAR FOCUS ON EXECUTIVE AND NON- EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS.

REPORT THIS REPORT PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF THE GROUP S APPROACH TO REMUNERATION, WITH PARTICULAR FOCUS ON EXECUTIVE AND NON- EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS.

External service providers assist Remnomco from time to time and, where this involves remuneration, appropriate benchmarking comparatives are made. The disclosure of the remuneration of executive Directors is governed by the JSE Listings Requirements and the Companies Act, 2008, with additional recommendations from King III. In order to maintain its competitive edge, the Group has applied the principles of King III that are appropriate for the business, to which there have been no material changes during the year under review. The Group complies with all disclosure aspects, except the recommendation of paragraph 180 of King III, relating to the present value of long-term incentives due to the varied valuation models and the unpredictable forecasting elements required to determine the value of the share options when vesting. The Group’s view is that to consider the present value of option awards as remuneration is misleading, in that the present value does not reflect the value paid to or receivable by the executive. Such gains can only be determined upon exercise of the options. However, to compensate for this omission, share option disclosure has been enhanced in order to aid shareholder evaluation (refer pages 73 and 74).
Show more

16 Read more

GWC Community GWC Services Children s Services Children s Services

GWC Community GWC Services Children s Services Children s Services

5.6 Sun Safety Outside play is a valuable component of all GWC Community Services Children’s Services programs. Our OSHC centres are both registered as Sun Smart OSHCs. Although weather conditions determine if outdoor programs continue, parents should expect that if it is not raining the children will go outside and therefore require a hat daily. When outdoors children will be encouraged to wear sun safe clothing with sleeves, collars or covered necklines. Children will be encouraged to wear sun safe hats that protect the face, neck and ears when outside. Recommended hats are bucket hats and broad brimmed hats. Baseball caps and visors are not recommended. Children who do not have a hat must play in a sheltered area. Staff will enforce the rule that where a child has not got a hat or is wearning clothing that is not recommended as appropriate they must access shaded areas in which to play.
Show more

18 Read more

Dementia Services in Northwest Surrey

Dementia Services in Northwest Surrey

Living well – support for carers Action for Carers (Surrey) Action for Carers is an organisation led be carers, whose main aim is to raise awareness of carers’ needs and concerns throughout Surrey. It also works in partnership with health and social care services to promote carers’ needs and ensure they receive good, quality services. Action for Carers provides training on moving and handling as part of the caring role as well as support and information on employment, training and learning opportunities. Their website offers more information about what they offer and will also signpost to further help, such as information about carers breaks and emergency planning.
Show more

21 Read more

Chief Executive s Report

Chief Executive s Report

j. Project Oriel: John Pelly briefed ME on progress with the search for a new site for Moorfields and the Institute. k. Visibility of senior leaders: ME discussed a plan to make senior leaders more visible and accessible within the organisation on a regular basis. This follows analysis of the outputs of the Moorfields Way project, which suggested that senior managers are not sufficiently visible at present. A separate plan to transfer the executive team’s offices from Ebenezer St to the main building is also being developed.

5 Read more

Executive management s report

Executive management s report

At the subsidiary level, a detailed term sheet was initialled with China Development Bank, which provides for a 25-year RMB3.6 billion non-recourse bank loan and proceeds will be used to fund 60% of the Group’s investment in the RMB6.0 billion Shenzhen Metro Line 4 project. Partners of the PPP associated company have also initialled two separate loan agreements with Industrial and Commercial Bank of China and China Development Bank, which provide for two non-recourse 25-year bank loans, each of RMB1.6 billion, for Beijing Metro Line 4.The long maturity, RMB denomination and fixed rate funding provided by these loans will help reduce respectively the refinancing, exchange rate and interest rate risks of the two projects.
Show more

6 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...