Top PDF Resilience and Young People Leaving Care: Overcoming the odds

Resilience and Young People Leaving Care: Overcoming the odds

Resilience and Young People Leaving Care: Overcoming the odds

Resilient young people have, in the main, had stability in their lives, although the relationship between providing stability and secure attachment is under-researched. However, it seems likely that the link between stability and improved life chances for care leavers is associated with some care leavers having experienced compensatory secure attachments, especially through long-term fostering, and, for others , the stability, although not necessarily resulting in secure attachment, has provided them with security and continuity in their lives (Jackson and Thomas, 2001; Jackson, 2002). In promoting resilience, providing stability and continuity may be as important as secure attachment, depending on the age of the young person on entry to care and their history, including the quality of their family relationships and links. Indeed, as recent research on adoptions has shown, not all adopted children and young people are able to form secure attachments – but they can benefit from stability and
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Research review: young people leaving care

Research review: young people leaving care

This research review has shown that care leavers as a group are likely to be socially excluded. However, the application of a resilience framework also suggests that there are differences in outcomes between those ‘moving on’, ‘surviving’ and becoming ‘victims’. In general terms, the evidence shows that these different pathways are associated with the quality of care they experience, their transitions from care and the support they receive after care. Improving outcomes for these young people will require more comprehensive responses across their life course: (1) early intervention and family support; (2) providing better quality care to compensate them for their damaging pre-care experiences through stability and continuity, as well
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Resilience and young people leaving care

Resilience and young people leaving care

The new legal framework provides an opportunity for improving services and thus the level of resourcing for young people leaving care – for example, in terms of housing, finance and personal support. This is very important in promoting their resilience. But what is important as well as the quantity is the quality of resource relationships. The principal finding from the only study to explore this dimension, carried out during the 1980s, was that young people who had successful transitions out of care not only displayed a higher level of total resource relationship but also had a lot more interactive relationships. They were, for example, able to negotiate decent housing, derive meaningful employment or work, participate in community and leisure activities, and engage in education. This study found that these young people’s social networks became richer and more amenable to expansion or contraction at will, and their personal states became more relaxed, stable and fulfilled. They were less lonely and isolated (Hart, 1984).
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Getting it right for children and young people: overcoming cultural barriers in the NHS so as to meet their needs

Getting it right for children and young people: overcoming cultural barriers in the NHS so as to meet their needs

consequences, all of which reflect cultural habits of the past that must be left behind. First, the practice must be accessible. This means that a service must be available around the clock which meets the needs of children and young people. This cannot, of course, mean that each general practice must be open. That would be too expensive and totally inefficient. But we cannot continue to tolerate the existing arrangements whereby, in the absence of real alternatives, children, young people and their parents and carers opt for the A&E department. This is equally too expensive and inefficient. What is needed, therefore, is a better, more efficient system than that which currently exists. And, in discussing what it might be, it is important to draw attention to a cultural barrier which has recently emerged to bedevil efforts to provide services for children and young people. I refer to the concept of ‘out-of-hours’ services, an expression that owes its origins to an agreement reached between GPs and DH. Leaving aside criticisms of the services that are provided, the concept is bewildering. It is so utterly focused on the world, the needs and concerns of the professional. Children, young people and their parents/carers do not understand the notion of being ill or needing help ‘out of hours’. They recognise the idea of the routine and the unusual. And the unusual happens when it happens. And help is needed when it happens.
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Promoting Resilience and Agency in Children and Young People Who Have Experienced Domestic Violence and Abuse: the “MPOWER” Intervention

Promoting Resilience and Agency in Children and Young People Who Have Experienced Domestic Violence and Abuse: the “MPOWER” Intervention

good rigorous trials have been conducted (Howarth et al. 2016). The limited evidence we do have suggests that good quality, group based interventions can make a difference in CYP’s resilience and wellbeing after domestic violence and abuse (Jenney and Alaggia 2012). Group interventions that are available focus on CYP’ s relationships with non-violent parents (Bunston et al. 2016; Smith 2016), emotional litera- cy (Lacasa et al. 2016), disrupted attachments and trauma (Bunston et al. 2016), and the prevention of involvement in future violence and abuse (Cornelius and Resseguie 2007; Siegel 2013). Some interventions focus on processing the violence itself (Glodich and Allen 1998; Peled and Davis 1995; Roseby et al. 2005; Tjersland 2012). Only a small number of documented programmes offer a strengths-based approach, but these are not widely reported in peer reviewed literature (e.g. see the report provided by Campo et al. 2014, for a review of these). In Europe, the most wide- ly used group based interventions are mother-and-child based. For example, the CEDAR (Children Experiencing Domestic Abuse Recovery) programme in Scotland (Sharp et al. 2011), the DART programme (Domestic Abuse Recovery Together) in England and Wales (Smith 2016), * Jane E. M. Callaghan
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Future positive : a resource guide for people working with disabled care leavers : edition 2

Future positive : a resource guide for people working with disabled care leavers : edition 2

The Cabinet Office publication, ‘Improving the Life Chances of Disabled People’ and the subsequent Green Paper on adult social care ‘Independence Choice and Well- Being’, promote the use of individualised budgets. The idea is that individuals are assessed to determine their level of need and then told how much money they can spend on purchasing support in a way of their choosing. This might be from people in their local community or more traditional services. They may need a broker to help them think about how best to get this support and the money to pay the broker is likely to form part of the financial allocation. This idea was piloted through a project known as ‘In Control’ with people with learning disabilities in six council areas including Wigan where the target group was young people in transition to adulthood. The perceived success of these pilots has led the government to announce an expansion of the In Control programme and the introduction of an individualised budget pilot project with other groups of people needing support. At the time of writing, the White paper on adult social care is awaited but is likely to make this a more wide- spread option which will be available in future to young people leaving care.
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Meeting their potential: the role of education and technology in overcoming disadvantage and disaffection in young people

Meeting their potential: the role of education and technology in overcoming disadvantage and disaffection in young people

There was a visible result at the end, and their contribution was externally valued. Young people saw the professional use of a digital image manipulation package, and recognised how the work could be undertaken using the techniques offered by this package. The freelance artist worked informally with the young people, but defined their roles within groups or teams. She used video for evaluation purposes, and to record video diaries. The use of cameras, video, and immediacy of results was found to be motivating. The artist found that disaffected pupils could be creative, especially when digital imagery was used well. She set up projects that could not fail, since self-esteem was very important. She found that pupils could be put into a ‘cannot draw’ bin, and ICT was used to challenge this perception.’
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Resilience for Young People with Physical Motor Deficiency

Resilience for Young People with Physical Motor Deficiency

The traits presented above are consistent with some well-known elements of resilience, and these include 1) psychological and dispositional attributes , 2) family support and cohesion , and 3) external support systems (Campbell-Sills et al., 2006; Connor & Davidson, 2003; Friborg et al., 2003). First, psychological and dispositional attributes includes the factors of 1) personal competence , 2) social competence , and 3) personal structure . Personal competence can be defined as an individual’s belief in ability, accomplishments, determination, and realistic perspective (e.g., “I can get through this traumatic event”; Friborg et al., 2003). Social competence is an individual’s belief in his or her ability in social situations and consists of extraversion, social/communication skills, ability to initiate conversations, and social adaptability. Personal structure refers to an in- dividual’s ability to plan and organize daily activities (e.g., develop and maintain a personal schedule for activities of daily living). Second, family support and co- hesion examines how families resolve conflict, cooperate to achieve goals, and maintain stability (e.g., family takes turns driving an individual to therapy). Third, external support systems refer to an individual’s ability to give and receive support from family and friends and develop intimacy with those close to him or her (Friborg et al., 2003), which is recognized as playing an integral role in reha- bilitation from a traumatic injury (Driver, Rees, O’Connor, & Lox, 2006).
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HIV and Young People: risk and resilience in the urban slum

HIV and Young People: risk and resilience in the urban slum

Much of the vulnerability of young slum dwellers, it is argued, owes to the sub­ jective experience of humiliation felt at a deep level that impacts risky behaviour within the broader structural universe of informal settlement residence - poor shel­ ter, violence, material deprivation, suboptimal health services and regular disloca­ tion. Whereas the literature has comprehensively explained risky and health-enhancing behaviour largely through cognitive and social theory, the case is still being made in discerning young people's behaviour as a considered resilience, of purposeful behaviour aimed at dignifying life in the present and making good in a neglected and deprived environment. Such resilience may not be conceived or wish to be perceived as rational or productive . Life for young slum inhabitants by necessity is shown to be experimental in nature and has at its core immediate and diverse forms of gratification.
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Resettlement of young people leaving custody: Lessons from the literature

Resettlement of young people leaving custody: Lessons from the literature

While the types of activities that come under the heading of resettlement have a long history (see for instance Lewis et al 2007; Bain, 2004), the expression itself is of relatively recent origin. It appeared for the first time in 1998 in a Home Office consultation paper (1998) as the preferred term for what had previously been called ‘throughcare’ or ‘aftercare’ – a reflection, it has been argued, of a hardening attitude towards those who broke the law since ‘care’ of those sentenced to custody was no longer to be seen as a primary function of criminal justice professionals (see for instance, Raynor, 2004a). The new term did, however, have the advantage of drawing attention to the disruptive nature of the custodial experience, emphasising the importance of readjustment for those returning to the community after a period of incarceration (Lewis et al, 2007). The change in terminology perhaps also contributed to a renewed emphasis on developing rehabilitative forms of intervention during and after custody in the light of evidence that the priority afforded to the provision of throughcare and aftercare services (particularly for short-term adult prisoners for whom such services were – and remain – voluntary) had declined substantially (Maguire et al, 1997; Nacro, 2000). Such concerns were heightened by a recognition that imprisonment continued to be associated with poor outcomes. The resettlement agenda received a significant impetus in 2002 with the publication of a major report on reoffending by ex-prisoners, published by the Social Exclusion Unit (2002).
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Engaging Young People? Student Experiences of the Leaving Certificate Applied

Engaging Young People? Student Experiences of the Leaving Certificate Applied

T he PPLS draws on data gathered from a theoretical sample of twelve case-study schools, identified on the basis of a postal survey of all second- level principals conducted at the beginning of the study. These schools were selected to capture varying approaches to ability grouping, subject choice and student integration, and encompass a range of sectors, sizes, locations and student characteristics. The study has followed a cohort of approximately 900 students from their entry to first year to their completion of second-level education (see Byrne and Smyth forthcoming, Smyth et al., 2007, Smyth et al., 2006 and Smyth et al., 2004). Students completed a written questionnaire each year (twice in first year) covering their attitudes to school, their choice of programmes and subjects, and their aspirations for the future. In addition, in-depth interviews were carried out with groups of the students, and with key personnel in the school, including principals and guidance counsellors. This is the first such longitudinal study in the Irish context and it allows us to identify the characteristics of young people who go on to take the different Leaving Certificate programmes. Analyses presented in this study relate to the questionnaires completed by fifth and sixth year students in the case-study schools. The number of the cohort taking LCA is relatively small (information was available on 51 junior cycle students who entered LCA but data on school experiences within LCA relate to 38 individuals) so the results should be interpreted with some caution. However, these are the only available data on young people’s experiences of the different Leaving 2.3
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POSTbrief: Number 23: December 2016:Education of Young People Leaving Custody

POSTbrief: Number 23: December 2016:Education of Young People Leaving Custody

Children are held in three different types of youth custody establishments: Young Offenders Institutes (YOIs), Secure Training Centres (STCs), and Secure Children’s Homes (SCHs). Multiple organisations are involved in commissioning, delivering, and monitoring educational services to children as they transition from custody back into the community (see Table 1 for a glossary). Arrangements for resettlement vary depending on the type of youth custody establishment the child has been held in, and sometimes also vary by region. A simplified diagram is shown in Figure 1.

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Resettlement of young people leaving resettlement: Lessons from the literature update: August 2014

Resettlement of young people leaving resettlement: Lessons from the literature update: August 2014

It has been suggested that, while the continued falls in the number of young people detained within custodial institutions are obviously to be welcomed, recent trends pose additional challenges for resettlement services (Bateman et al, 2013a). A previous literature review update summarised recent evidence that, as children and young people whose offending is of a less serious or persistent nature are increasingly diverted from prison, the residual population is correspondingly more likely to display an entrenched pattern of offending behaviour. It is also likely to have a higher concentration of problems (Bateman and Hazel, 2014a). No separate data of this kind has been published relating specifically to young prisoners aged 18-24, but it would not be unreasonable to suppose that a concentration of disadvantage may have occurred among this population as the overall level of incarceration has reduced. Resettling such young people is clearly a more difficult endeavour.
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Resettlement of young people leaving custody : lessons from the literature update July 2015

Resettlement of young people leaving custody : lessons from the literature update July 2015

That said, the research had a number of limitations. The sample was small and the research was only conducted with men. As such, the results could not be generalised to women, even though there are higher rates of suicide behaviour reported by women prisoners than either women in the general population or male prisoners. The Harris Review (2015) notes that this pattern has changed recently, “with a higher rate of self-inflicted deaths among male prisoners compared to female prisoners”; however, the pattern is still different between young adult males and young adult females. Between 2002 and 2013 the average rate of self-inflicted deaths decreased with age for female prisoners (with the exception of 15-17 year olds), suggesting that a higher proportion of young adult women took their own lives than older females. This indicates the need for gender-specific and trauma- informed treatment and services for women and girls in custody.
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Helping Care Leavers: P roblems and Strategic Responses

Helping Care Leavers: P roblems and Strategic Responses

Evidence also suggests that preparation should be holistic in a p p roach, attaching equal importance to practical emotional and inter-personal skills. Elements of preparation may include: self care s k i l l s – personal hygiene, diet and health, including sexual health; p ractical skills– budgeting, shopping, cooking, cleaning; i n t e r - personal skills– managing a range of formal and informal

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Sink or swim : leaving care in New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Social Policy at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

Sink or swim : leaving care in New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Social Policy at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

interviews with eight young New Zealanders about their experiences in care, their circumstances when leaving care and, for the seven who had already left care, their ongoing transition t[r]

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Resettlement of young people leaving resettlement:Lessons from the literature update: October 2013

Resettlement of young people leaving resettlement:Lessons from the literature update: October 2013

The underlying intention of the legislative change is to ensure that young people (and adults) serving short-term custodial sentences receive a minimum period of resettlement support. Moreover, a recent study published by the Ministry of Justice provides evidence that probation supervision can contribute to reduced levels of offending. The research looks at one and two year recidivism rates of adult offenders either side of the 12-month custodial sentence supervision threshold, allowing a comparison of a sample of offenders who received statutory supervision with a similar sample of those who did not. The study found that for offenders with one or no previous convictions, probation supervision was associated with a reduction in reoffending of between 14-17 percentage points one year after release and between 16-20 percentage points after two years. The differences were statistically significant (Lai, 2013). However, the extended requirements for statutory supervision are compulsory. Where a court is satisfied that a young person has breached the conditions of supervision, it may impose a fine, a supervision default order requiring the young person to undertake unpaid work or to be subject to an electronically monitored curfew, or commit him or her to custody for up to 14 days. As the table above shows, in some cases the new arrangements will place young people at risk of proceedings for non-compliance with the prospects of a return to custody for significantly longer periods.
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Supporting Young People Who Enter Into Secure Care or Custody to Reintegrate Into Communities

Supporting Young People Who Enter Into Secure Care or Custody to Reintegrate Into Communities

The amount and availability of support networks that each young person has is integral to their successful exit from secure care or custody. It is essential that family and support networks are identified within the community and built upon for sustainability, with provision made for assessments and planning. Under the GIRFEC agenda, this should then be incorporated into the child’s plan (Scottish Government, 2011). Community social workers also need to be involved in a young person’s sentence from the outset. Where a ‘lead professional’ exists as outlined in the Children’s Hearings (Scotland) Act 2011 this should make transition easier. Length of sentence may influence this involvement but initially the lead professional/named person should be in contact with the secure provider or prison to share the single plan and contribute to the young person’s plan for their time in secure care/custody and for when they return to the community. If a young person is subject to a Compulsory Supervision Order through the Children’s Hearings System, this should not be terminated simply because they have been remanded or given a custodial sentence. Any decision to terminate should be based on a needs and risk assessment.
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young people on race, school exclusion and leaving care

young people on race, school exclusion and leaving care

The United Kingdom is one of the richest countries in the world. In terms of GDP, it comes in at number four and around two million of its young people are enrolled in further education each year. Life expectancy is high and infant mortality is low. We are, by almost any measure relative to other countries, healthy and wealthy. Most people in the UK have adequate housing, food and warmth. The great majority of young people attend school and college, gain qualifications and find work. They are supported by family and friends; they develop plans and ambitions. They feel good about life.
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Physical Activity and Children in Care: A Scoping Review of Barriers, Facilitators, and Policy for Disadvantaged Youth

Physical Activity and Children in Care: A Scoping Review of Barriers, Facilitators, and Policy for Disadvantaged Youth

(1) to explore the impact that social, leisure and informal learning activities have on the learning identities and educational participation of young people in and leaving care and; (2) to highlight the contribution that leisure activities can make to improving the educational outcomes

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