Top PDF A Risk Assessment for Road Transportation of Dangerous Goods: A Routing Solution

A Risk Assessment for Road Transportation of Dangerous Goods: A Routing Solution

A Risk Assessment for Road Transportation of Dangerous Goods: A Routing Solution

Traffic congestion and road accidents are closely related by an inverse relationship which can pose a potential dilemma for transport policy makers (Shefer and Rietveld, 1997). Shefer (1994) has proposed an inverse relationship between congestion and road fatalities, in which volume over capacity ratio was used to measure the level of congestion. A further study by Shefer and Rietveld (1997) investigated the link between congestion and safety on highways. Starting from the hypothesis previously used, they compared fatality rates throughout the day, and found that during peak hours the fatality rate is lower than that at other times of the day. Due to data unavailability they examined a proposed model, using a simulated dataset rather than real-world data. Quddus (2009) underlined that this studies tend to use an analytical approach and a weak proxy for traffic congestion, so as such, more robust empirical evidence, and a precise congestion measurement, are required. However, collecting data for multiple year to describe the relationship between traffic congestion and road accidents is an expensive and time consuming activity.
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DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTATION: A

DANGEROUS GOODS TRANSPORTATION: A

Hellenic Institute of Transport / Centre for Research & Technology Hellas 2 Several thousands of trucks carrying dangerous goods circulate within European roads on daily basis. They utilise urban roads, rural roads, highways, tunnels and long bridges and in some cases they are not allowed in some of them. But the actual accident risk and impact when using secondary roads or other alternative ways is not calculated. In addition, when due to unforeseen events (traffic jams, accidents, etc.) they need to change route, they do not have any particular guidance on the safest alternative nor are consequences of road choice to the business chain and societal risk calculated. Thus, the management of risks involved in the transportation of dangerous goods has become a necessity. This process should include early recognition of potential problems (by on-board units and infrastructure based info; both in a dynamic manner), information about actual cargo and driver status, optimal routing and/or re-routing and monitoring and enforcement of dangerous goods movements within the transportation network.
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Vulnerability and Resilience of the Territory Concerning Risk of Dangerous Goods Transportation (DGT): Proposal of a Spatial Model

Vulnerability and Resilience of the Territory Concerning Risk of Dangerous Goods Transportation (DGT): Proposal of a Spatial Model

The definition of TVI and TRI is a first tool that contributes to identify, with maps and statistics, the level of vulnerability and the level of resilience of a territory. These indices are a continuation of the researches developed by Garbolino et al. (2007) and Tomasoni et al. (2010). It is important to underline that these indices need to be considered with other variables like the amount of exposed population, in order to bring a better accuracy for decision-makers. This study also focuses on the differences between the risks generated with two different DGT: the road and the rail ones. It is well known that rail DGT is safer than road DGT because of the less probability of occurrence of accident with rail (Nicolet-Monnier and Gheorghe, 1996). But trains carry a larger amount of hazardous materials than trucks and they cross cities centres. So, they expose more people to a probable hazardous event than truck transportation systems. The goal of this paper is not to decide and generalize a solution for urban and infrastructures planning, but it aims to highlight that the choice of a transportation system for dangerous goods should be evaluated at different geographical levels and should take into account to the spatial properties of the territory.
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NON-Hazardous Chemical, NON-Dangerous Goods

NON-Hazardous Chemical, NON-Dangerous Goods

PPE for First Aiders: Wear gloves, apron, safety glasses. Available information suggests that gloves made from butyl rubber, natural rubber, nitrile rubber should be suitable for intermittent contact. However, due to variations in glove construction and local conditions, the user should make a final assessment. Always wash hands before smoking, eating, drinking or using the toilet. Wash contaminated clothing and other protective equipment before storing or re-using.

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Risk assessment on shipping logistics of dangerous chemicals

Risk assessment on shipping logistics of dangerous chemicals

Chemical industry in China witnesses fast development along with continuous economic and social progress and resulting from favorable policies in recent years. Correspondingly, shipment of dangerous chemicals is also developing with a growing speed [1]. However, shipment of dangerous chemicals is of relatively high risk for the special properties of the articles during shipping. And even the society would be affected once an accident occurs. The research, therefore, identifies the risks existing during shipping logistics of dangerous chemicals and conducts a risk assessment for that from the perspective of risk management. The purpose of it is to lower the risks and ensure smooth operation of shipping dangerous chemicals.
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Transporting Dangerous Goods Safely

Transporting Dangerous Goods Safely

Incompatible dangerous goods must not be included in the same package. IATA imposes additional labelling requirements. Limited Quantities Limited Quantities of some less-hazardous dangerous goods (eg those that are allowed to be carried on passenger aircraft) may be transported in non-UN specification packaging provided special provisions are met. These provisions are detailed in IATA’s section 2.8. The packaging does not have to be officially tested in an approved laboratory to UN specifications, but it must meet the requirements of the relevant Packing Instruction specified in the relevant code. The package must be capable of passing the stacking test and be able to withstand a drop of 1.2 m onto solid concrete in the position most likely to cause damage. IATA denotes limited quantity Packing Instructions by a capital letter ‘Y’ in front of the Packing Instruction number. ICAO and IATA Packing Instruction 910 allows cosmetics, drugs and medicines (packaged for retail sale or distribution for personal or household consumption) to be packed in non-UN specification packaging to a total gross mass of 30 kg. Stretch or shrink-wrapped trays are not acceptable.
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Taxation of Road Goods Vehicles – An Economic Assessment

Taxation of Road Goods Vehicles – An Economic Assessment

Introduction The Importance of Road Haulage Taxation The Analytical Issues Involved Problems in Measuring Long Run Marginal Capital and Maintenance Costs The Existing Approach The Adequa[r]

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STORAGE AND HANDLING OF DANGEROUS GOODS

STORAGE AND HANDLING OF DANGEROUS GOODS

Top loading must use either hoses (connected liquid tight), or a hose and spear (in contact with the bottom of the tank) through an open hatch. If loading is controlled manually (ie without a preset meter) a “dead man’s handle” should always be used. This is a self-closing valve (usually spring loaded) that has to be pulled continuously to allow the liquid to flow. It is not sufficient to have only the pump stop button to stop the transfer. Flammable and combustible liquids should never be “splash filled” into a container or tank, due to the risk of ignition by static electrical discharge. These liquids should be loaded through a hose and spear that discharges below the level of the liquid as it fills the tank and allows static electricity to be conducted away.
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A comparative study on liability issues concerning maritime transportation of dangerous goods: International and Chinese perspectives

A comparative study on liability issues concerning maritime transportation of dangerous goods: International and Chinese perspectives

International carriage of goods by sea has been governed by convention law for almost one hundred years starting with the adoption of the Hague Rules in 1924 192 which was inspired by the U.S. Harter Act of 1893 and the legislation of Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It was considered to be a landmark event which was instrumental in breaking the stranglehold of British carriers. The Visby Protocol to the Hague Rules hailed as a significant improvement on the original Hague Rules was adopted in 1968 and came to be known as the Hague-Visby Rules. Even though these Rules represented a favourable move in the direction of shipper interests, in the post-Hague/Visby period, shipper states felt that the pendulum had not swung enough in their favour especially in terms of the liability regime. Their voices were heard and complaints were heeded in some quarters internationally as a result of which the Hamburg Rules were adopted in 1978 193 under the auspices of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) with major input from the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) widely regarded as a champion of the third world (developing countries). 194 Even though the Hamburg Rules did eventually enter into force in 1992 after a prolonged interval since its adoption, the convention did not gain much support universally.
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Research on Road Dangerous Goods Transport System Risk Evaluation Method: Based on Translation Corrected Entropy Weight Method

Research on Road Dangerous Goods Transport System Risk Evaluation Method: Based on Translation Corrected Entropy Weight Method

accidents number and translation-corrected Entropy Weight Method (EWM) to calculate coupling coordination degree (CCD), established a new RDGTSR evaluation approach. We introduced the information loss tolerance coefficient (ILTC) to control the data information loss in a reasonable range when we applied the translation-corrected EWM to obtain the weight, the strict mathematical proof and case study results show that the smaller of the ILTC, the final weight is closer to the weight without translation-corrected. Also the case study results show that three-factors coupling degree is higher than both two-factors and four-factors coupling degree, higher coupling degree means higher risk to cause dangerous goods transport accidents. Meanwhile, CCD is higher during January to June than the value during July to December, higher CCD means better development of road dangerous goods transport system, higher degree of system harmony and orderliness degree, and easy to cause a road dangerous goods transport accident.
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TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

This test is used to measure the sensitiveness of the substance to frictional stimuli and to determine if the substance is too dangerous to transport in the form tested. 13.5.1.2 Apparatus and materials 13.5.1.2.1 The friction apparatus (see Figure 13.5.1.1) consists of a cast steel base, on which is mounted the friction device proper. This comprises a fixed porcelain peg and a moving porcelain plate (see paragraph 13.5.1.2.2). The porcelain plate is held in a carriage which runs in two guides. The carriage is connected to an electric motor via a connecting rod, an eccentric cam and suitable gearing such that the porcelain plate is moved, once only, backwards and forwards beneath the porcelain peg a distance of 10 mm. The loading device pivots on an axis so that the porcelain peg can be changed; it is extended by a loading arm which is fitted with 6 notches for the attachment of a weight. Zero load is obtained by adjusting a counterweight. When the loading device is lowered onto the porcelain plate, the longitudinal axis of the porcelain peg is perpendicular to the plate. There are different weights of masses up to 10 kg. The loading arm is fitted with 6 notches of distances of 11 cm, 16 cm, 21 cm, 26 cm, 31 cm and 36 cm from the axis of the porcelain peg. A weight is hung into a notch on the loading arm by means of a ring and hook. The use of different weights in different notches results in loads on the peg of 5 - 10 - 20 - 40 - 60 -80 - 120 - 160 - 240 - 360 N. If necessary, intermediate loads may be used.
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TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS

1. These Recommendations have been developed by the United Nations Economic and Social Council's Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods in the light of technical progress, the advent of new substances and materials, the exigencies of modern transport systems and, above all, the requirement to ensure the safety of people, property and the environment. They are addressed to governments and international organizations concerned with the regulation of the transport of dangerous goods. They do not apply to the transport of dangerous goods in bulk which, in most countries, is subject to special regulations. 2. The recommendations concerning the transport of dangerous goods are presented in the form of "Model Regulations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods", which are presented as annex to this document. The Model Regulations aim at presenting a basic scheme of provisions that will allow uniform development of national and international regulations governing the various modes of transport; yet they remain flexible enough to accommodate any special requirements that might have to be met. It is expected that governments, intergovernmental organizations and other international organizations, when revising or developing regulations for which they are responsible, will conform to the principles laid down in these Model Regulations, thus contributing to worldwide harmonization in this field. Furthermore, the new structure, format and content should be followed to the greatest extent possible in order to create a more user-friendly approach, to facilitate the work of enforcement bodies and to reduce the administrative burden. Although only a recommendation, the Model Regulations have been drafted in the mandatory sense (i.e., the word "shall" is employed throughout the text rather than "should") in order to facilitate direct use of the Model Regulations as a basis for national and international transport regulations.
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Dangerous Goods Safety Guidance Note. Dangerous goods emergency plans for small businesses

Dangerous Goods Safety Guidance Note. Dangerous goods emergency plans for small businesses

The definitive guidance on the preparation of emergency plans is found in Australian Standard AS 3745 Planning for emergencies in facilities. This Standard has been approved by the Minister as an approved code of practice under section 20 of the Dangerous Goods Safety Act 2004 (the Act). It provides guidance to organisations of all sizes and all types of facilities with all types of emergency hazards, but there is no specific guidance on particular hazards or dangerous goods. Being applicable to larger organisations, a lot of detail is given, much of which is not relevant to small owner-operated sites with less than five occupants.
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Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

Hazardous Substance, NON-Dangerous Goods

Wear safety shoes, overalls, gloves, safety glasses.Available information suggests that gloves made from should be suitable for intermittent contact. However, due to variations in glove construction and local conditions, the user should make a final assessment. Always wash hands before smoking, eating, drinking or using the toilet. Wash contaminated clothing and other protective equipment before storing or re-using.

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Hazardous Substance, Dangerous Goods CAUSTIC SODA

Hazardous Substance, Dangerous Goods CAUSTIC SODA

Segregation Dangerous Goods: Not to be loaded with explosives (Class 1), dangerous when wet substances (Class 4.3), oxidising agents (Class 5.1), organic peroxides (Class 5.2), radioactive substances (Class 7) or food and food packaging in any quantity. Note 1: Concentrated strong alkalis are incompatible with concentrated strong acids. Note 2: Concentrated strong acids are incompatible with concentrated strong alkalis. Note 3: Acids are incompatible with Dangerous Goods of Class 6 which are cyanides. Exemptions may apply.

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Online Transportation of Goods

Online Transportation of Goods

 Describing the whole from origin to the deployment of the process, the materials and products moving into, and out of firm are required to bring about the change. The material received by the suppliers is kept in the monitoring unit of the inbound logistics. Materials management describes the movement of materials and components within a firm. Physical distribution is the term which refers to the transportation of goods from the end of the assembly line to the consumers. All in all, we can say that the logistics is smaller than supply-chain management, and that it helps in linking user‟s directly to the communicating network and it also has a tough engineering staff to employ such process.
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Research on Safety Risk of Dangerous Chemicals Road Transportation Based on Dynamic Fault Tree and Bayesian Network Hybrid Method (TECHNICAL NOTE)

Research on Safety Risk of Dangerous Chemicals Road Transportation Based on Dynamic Fault Tree and Bayesian Network Hybrid Method (TECHNICAL NOTE)

Hazardous chemicals occur widely in the production and living facilities. During the transport process of hazardous chemicals, once an accident occurs, major casualties and property damage will follow and the surrounding environment will experience serious damage. Therefore, the research for safety risk of road transportation of dangerous chemicals is quitenecessary. The safety risk study on road transportation of hazardous chemicals is a reliable basis for the government to formulate transportation planning and preparing emergent schemes, but also is an important reference for safety risk managers to carry out dangerous chemicals safety risk management. In order to study the reliability of the whole road transport system and take into account the dynamic changes of the safety risk, based on the analysis of the transport safety risk of dangerous chemicals at home and abroad, this paper studied four main factors influencing the safety risk of road transportation, and presents the dynamic fault tree and Bayesian network hybrid method to identify and evaluate the dynamic safety risk of the road transportation of dangerous chemicals. Finally, the feasibility of the model is verified by the case study of road transportation of liquefied natural gas in a real enterprise.
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GIS interfaced OECD/PIARC QRA model for road transportation of hazardous goods

GIS interfaced OECD/PIARC QRA model for road transportation of hazardous goods

To cite this version: Emmanuel Ruffin, Charlotte Bouissou, Rapha¨ el Defert, Nelson Rodrigues, Eric Dannin, et al.. GIS interfaced OECD/PIARC QRA model for road transportation of hazardous goods. PAS- MAN, H.J., SKARKA, J., BABINEC, F. 11. International Symposium on Loss Prevention and Safety Promotion in the Process Industry, May 2004, Praha, Czech Republic. PetroChemEng. Praha, pp.4273-4282, 2004. <ineris-00972451>

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Hazardous, Dangerous Goods. Heptane, 200 Litres

Hazardous, Dangerous Goods. Heptane, 200 Litres

PPE for First Aiders: Wear safety shoes, overalls, gloves, chemical goggles, respirator. Use with adequate ventilation. If inhalation risk exists wear organic vapour/particulate respirator meeting the requirements of AS/NZS 1715 and AS/NZS 1716. Available information suggests that gloves made from nitrile rubber should be suitable for intermittent contact. However, due to variations in glove construction and local conditions, the user should make a final assessment. Always wash hands before smoking, eating, drinking or using the toilet. Wash contaminated clothing and other protective equipment before storing or re-using.
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Research of dangerous goods flows by rail

Research of dangerous goods flows by rail

1.1.2. Tarptautinis jūra gabenamų pavojingų krovinių kodeksas (IMDG KODEKSAS) IMDG (angl. International Maritime Dangerous Goods) kodeksas reglamentuoja pavojingų krovinių gabenimo jūros transportu taisykles. IMDG kodeksas taip pat, kaip ir RID taisyklės, sudarytas iš 7 skyrių. Vieno reiso metu gali būti taikomas IMDG kodeksas arba Supratimo memorandumas. Uostuose laikomasi vietinių saugos taisyklių. Ro-ro tipo laivais, kuriems pagal 7 straipsnį buvo išduotas atitikties pažymėjimas, vienu metu galima vežti ir krovininio transporto vienetus, ir krovinių vienetus su pavojingais kroviniais, kurių pakrovimas atitinka RID/ADR reikalavimus arba IMDG kodekso reikalavimus [17].
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