Top PDF Safeguarding in English schools

Safeguarding in English schools

Safeguarding in English schools

safeguarding lead but any staff member can make a referral to children’s social care; other options could include referral to specialist services or early help services. The local authority should make a decision regarding the action to be taken within one working day of a referral and this should be communicated to the person who made the referral. If the child’s situation does not improve, then the designated safeguarding lead or the person who made the referral should press for re-consideration. Further information on the referral process is provided by paragraphs 21 to 27, and a flow chart on page 10, of guidance. If a child is in immediate danger or is at risk of harm then a referral should be made to children’s social care and/or the police immediately. Similarly, if a teacher discovers that an act of female genital mutilation appears to have been carried out on a girl under the age of 18, this must be reported to the police. 22
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 June 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

A “significant number” of respondents to the consultation expressed the view that education should actually be included as a fourth safeguarding partner. The Government’s response acknowledged this but noted that the safeguarding partners are defined by the Act and statutory guidance cannot amend the structures set out in law. The response confirmed that the Government intended to include the proposed expectation in the guidance and added that the Government would “seek to give greater emphasis to the role of schools in the published guidance”. 8

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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 October 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 8023, 5 October 2018: Safeguarding in English schools

Reporting restrictions introduced by the Education Act 2002 prevent the publication of material that may lead to the identification of a teacher who has been accused by a pupil from the same school. This restriction, which includes publishing material on social network sites, applies until the accused is charged with an offence or until the Teaching Regulation Agency publishes information about an investigation. The guidance notes this restriction and states that it is important that schools make “every effort” to maintain confidentiality when an allegation is made. 84

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Counter-extremism policy in English schools

Counter-extremism policy in English schools

Protecting pupils from the risk of radicalisation should be seen as part of schools’ wider safeguarding duties. It is important to understand the risk of radicalisation as a safeguarding risk that is similar in nature to protecting children from other harms. We agree with the Committee that it is important that referrals are made in a sensible and proportionate fashion. That is why the Department’s advice and guidance on the Prevent Duty make clear that if teachers have concerns about any pupils they should follow normal safeguarding procedures and act proportionately. There are no mandatory reporting requirements under the Duty. We recognise the importance of dispelling myths and improving understanding of Prevent, and are working proactively to communicate its positive impact and encourage balanced reporting by the press. We are also working closely with schools and local communities to improve understanding of the duty and make clear that it is about safeguarding young people from the dangers of being drawn into terrorism.
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How are English secondary schools interpreting their freedom to be different?

How are English secondary schools interpreting their freedom to be different?

There was a strong commitment to change among all the headteachers. However it appears that the incentive for this may not be the explicit invitation to innovate described in Transforming Secondary Schools, but rather comes from within the school itself. These headteachers were changing the practices and policies of their schools because they believed the present ones were inadequate. However they also seemed to see themselves as dependent upon external forces and recognised that some changes could only happen when additional money was available, when new curriculum or curriculum changes allowed or when changes in workforce policy provided some flexibility in staffing.
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Schools : GCSE English grading issues : September 2012

Schools : GCSE English grading issues : September 2012

These reforms are radical, so we will consult widely. Their introduction will require careful preparation, so we propose the first teaching of the new certificates in English, maths and the sciences in September 2015, with other subjects following. To ensure that the benefits of this more rigorous approach to the English baccalaureate subjects are felt across the whole curriculum, we will ask Ofqual to consider how the new higher standards could be used as a template for judging and accrediting a new suite of qualifications, beyond those subjects, to replace the entire suite of GCSEs. 23
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Challenges In Teaching English At Rural And Urban Schools And Their Solutions

Challenges In Teaching English At Rural And Urban Schools And Their Solutions

English is a foreign language, and it is one of the most essential international languages for communication. English is not commonly used in daily Indonesian life [1]. Futhermore, the goverment has decided that English becomes a compulsory lesson in secondary schools and it is one of the subjects to be tested in National Examination [1]. English is very important in getting a better job and in social interaction with people around the world. Besides, it is also the main language in trade, commerce, news, and information in globalized world. Teaching English as a foreign language is a challenging task both in rural and urban areas. Teachers have to pay attention to the language skills of the students such as reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Beside that, the teachers should help the technology, and encourage the students to have enthusiasm, good attitude, and motivation to learn English. The purpose of teaching English at schools is to increase the students’ competence in communication facing the globalization era. The purpose of English learning is making the students flexible in using the language [2]. There are some different challenges faced by the teachers both in rural and urban schools. The challenges are related to the students, teachers, and faclities. The example of students challenges are vocabulary mastery, students concentration, parents support, discipline, boredom, and speaking ability. Then, the teachers challenges are teacher Training, teaching method, and the mastery of using IT in teaching learning process. The facilities issues are facilities and time limit. The economy in some rural areas develop rapidly, but in some areas it is still in bad condition. It is because of the lack of facilities in rural areas such as the school buliding and IT equipment. The students in this place are not very well informed. The students can not integrate with the society quite well because they are isolated. In contrast, the education in urban schools are good. They are affected by urbanization. There are so many young teachers of middle schools in rural areas. Sometimes, they only have few work experiences. Futhermore, the school in rural area often find some problems related to the teacher quality. In Indonesia, the teachers choosed to move to urban schools which offer them better work condition. Department of Education often gets some difficulties in recruiting rural teachers. The problem that can be easily identified in rural schools is the low of teacher’s quality. Actually, schools in rural areas have important role for
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Effective Techniques of Teaching English in Tribal Schools Learners

Effective Techniques of Teaching English in Tribal Schools Learners

class. Andreas Johansson (2010) opined that, in general, the students were positive towards grammar and thought that the teacher-student relationship was to some extent important for learning grammar. The sample under the investigation showed their interest on repeating sentences after their teacher in English class. Learners’ attitudes could incorporate in language learning because it may influence their performance in acquiring the target language. Students’ attitude, i.e. feelings, beliefs, likes, dislikes, needs, should be considered, since their attitudes influence language learning (Shahrzad Eshghinejad and Kriss Gritter, 2016) It is observed from the study that the students does not like if the teacher speaks in Telugu during English class. In a study conducted by Ahmed Maher Mahmoud Al Nakhalah (2016) suggested to one of the question that the students should avoid anxiety by encouraging them to speak fluently even if they make errors or mistakes in their speaking and not to criticize them cruelly, more over the teachers should let students avoid the fearful of criticism, or simply shy by making them familiar with the person whom are talking with. It is concluded from this investigation that three-fourth of the students strongly agreed that they like an English class in which they do not need to speak in English. The teachers should create an English speaking environment by encouraging the students to use English in the classroom to make it a habit, letting those watching films or videos in English and the
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IMPACT OF ENGLISH INSTRUCTION AT THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS ON THE STUDENTS' ACHIEVEMENT OF ENGLISH AT THE LOWER SECONDARY SCHOOL

IMPACT OF ENGLISH INSTRUCTION AT THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS ON THE STUDENTS' ACHIEVEMENT OF ENGLISH AT THE LOWER SECONDARY SCHOOL

intended for the fourth grade students. It can be inferred that the materials for the fourth grade students are partly presented at Grade 3, so when the students are at Grade 4, they come across a lot of repeated teaching items. As a result, they did not gain more instructional materials at the fourth grade since the teaching items for the third and fourth grades were of the same learning scope. As discovered and pedagogically justified by Bliesener (1994), the introduction of early teaching of English in primary schools should be equipped with an open curriculum frame- work in that what primary schools have achieved in their foreign language classes are to be utilized by secondary schools. Second, another impact on the students achievement of English deals with the socio- economic context at school and out- side school which has contribution on the students achievement at higher level of education. This has been evident for the theories of language learning in general and second language learning in children in specific claimed by Dunkin and Biddle (1974) and Elley and Mangubhai (1983) stating that in learning a language, some internal and external aspects have to be accounted for such as presage variables, context variables, process variables and product variables. The presage variables involve the role of teachers and their properties, the context variables deal with the students' characteristics and their environment, the process variables incorporate the teaching and learning activities in the classroom, and finally the product vari- ables refer to the immediate pupil growth and the long-term pupils effects.
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Improving Educational Outcomes of English Language Learners in Schools and Programs in Boston Public Schools

Improving Educational Outcomes of English Language Learners in Schools and Programs in Boston Public Schools

This finding about the time required for English proficiency leads to a second concern. The normal road to academic English proficiency would be acceptable for these students if they were receiving instruction of academic content – Math, science, social studies – in a language they understood while they were learning English. If this were the case, once they attained English proficiency they could join their peers at grade level. That is not possible in Boston or in the state because English language learners are unable to participate in content classes that are linguistically accessible to them (except if parents submit a waiver requesting non-SEI program placement) and because English language learners are not always taught by a teacher with experience in making the content accessible across the language divide. The barrier to the former is Chapter 386 of the Acts of 2002 and its implemen- tation; the barrier to the latter is the lack of appro- priate professional development of teachers. This situation leaves LEP students, especially older ones with low English proficiency, in a quandary. LEP students at the lowest MEPA performance levels accounted for 23.9% of middle school LEP students and 24% of all LEP students in high school. The MCAS pass rates of middle school LEP students
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English teaching material development as an alternative source in teaching English at junior high schools

English teaching material development as an alternative source in teaching English at junior high schools

There are many models of learning that can facilitate teachers perform key functions as learning agent. One of the well-known learning models is a model of Quantum Learning. Quantum Teaching is a body of knowledge and methodology used in the design, presentation, and facilitation in the Super Camp, an accelerated learning program method to learn the practice of Quantum Learning. The results shows that Quantum Learning can improve students’ skills, increase their positive habit and also boosts their confidence (Vos Groenendal in DePorter & Hernacki, 1992). The success of the method in the Super Camp makes some schools invite them to train teachers with this method. To fulfill the need broader, their training methods at Super Camp written in a book called Quantum Teaching, to be used by teachers in implementing learning in the classroom. So, it is the practice of Quantum Learning in the classroom. Simply put, Quantum Learning can be defined as learning that orchestrate interactions into light boost student achievement, by removing barriers to learning through the use of appropriate means and tools, so that students can learn easily and naturally. Quantum Learning is designed based on three things: the first principle, principles, and models (DePorter & Hernacki, 1992).
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English Language and its Importance of Learning it in Albanian Schools

English Language and its Importance of Learning it in Albanian Schools

Taking into consideration many factors that indicate that the English language has taken an important place in communication and its use by millions in the whole world has become a necessity and not an unecessary subject in the teaching process in Albanian universities. As a result of that many countries including Albania are seeing an increase of the demand for teaching the English language since the first grades. Also it is found necessary the addition of classes of foreign languages in Albanian schools and universities. The curricula of the language is enriched each year and the new methods are becoming more profitable in teaching the language. Naturally teaching the English at school is becoming important not only academically but also in the practical aspect of learning, such as using language for various purposes such as business purposes, communication, reading foreign books especially in literature or other types. In the aspect of learning the language in the school not only the book is important but also other factors need to be taken into account.
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Translanguaging Used By English Teacher at Vocational Schools Medan

Translanguaging Used By English Teacher at Vocational Schools Medan

The objective of this endeavor was to examine the utilization of translanguaging by vocational English teachers in Medan. The emphasis of the study was to identify the English instructor of vocational schools in Medan translated instruction in classroom. This endeavor was implemented by utilizing descriptive qualitative technique. The data of the research were the talk of English teacher instructions of vocational schools in Medan. The data were taken and collected from recorded and videos of the English teacher of vocational schools in Medan. The data were analyzed by applying the inductive model proposed by Miles, Huberman & Saldana (2014) such as data condensation, data display, and conclusion drawing or verification. The results of the study showed that teacher used English first and continued in using Indonesian language to make the students comprehend about the conversation in the classroom. Thus, the students are not bored and interest to study English.
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Safeguarding Genetic Privacy

Safeguarding Genetic Privacy

Since the completion in 2003 of the Human Genome Project’s initial goal to map all the genes and discover the complete nucleotide sequence in the human genome, opportunities for many significant medical advances have opened up to us, including gene therapies for various genetically-linked medical disorders, the ability to create “custom-made” drugs, and early, reliable diagnosis of genetic predispositions to disease. Genetic testing, the inspection of a person’s DNA to identify mutated sequences, is medically relevant for individuals. However, along with the undeniable benefits this knowledge brings, serious questions have arisen concerning how this knowledge should be handled to protect the rights of individuals. Two major areas of concern are the “privacy and confidentiality of genetic information, and fairness in the use of genetic information by insurers, employers, courts, schools, adoption agencies, and the military” as noted on the Human Genome Project website (www.ornl.gov/hgmis).
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Family Safeguarding Hertfordshire

Family Safeguarding Hertfordshire

List of Tables Table 1: Evaluation Data by Source 21 Table 2: Direct Practice: Analysis of Skills Pre- and Post-FSH 36 Table 3: Parent and Carer Interviews: Outcomes Pre- and Post-FSH 40[r]

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Safeguarding vulnerable groups

Safeguarding vulnerable groups

The Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 provided for a new Vetting and Barring Scheme under which individuals who wish to engage in certain types of employment or activity involving contact with children or vulnerable adults will have to apply to be subject to monitoring by a government body: the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA). There will no longer be any ministerial role in deciding whether particular individuals should be barred from working with children or vulnerable adults. Inclusion on the new lists of individuals prohibited from taking part in “regulated” or “controlled” activity will take place on a case-by- case basis with provision for automatic inclusion in respect of individuals who have been convicted of certain offences. If someone is ISA registered this will mean that the ISA has found no known reason why the applicant should not work with children or vulnerable adults. The scheme is being reviewed by the current Coalition Government with certain aspects of the scheme’s introduction being halted.
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Prevention in adult safeguarding

Prevention in adult safeguarding

The PILS team decided to run two workshops for tenants under the banner of ‘Providing personalised services’. The two workshops were run on the same day in September 2010. One was on safeguarding and the other on dignity. In the first, the aim was to explore people’s knowledge about what constitutes abuse and whether they would know what to do about it. The second focused on issues of dignity and respect, which PILS believe are essential underlying factors in abuse prevention. Beforehand, April worked with the Council’s Employee Development Unit to devise the programme and met with the independent facilitator to explain what they wanted to achieve from the day.
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ADULT SAFEGUARDING PROCEDURES

ADULT SAFEGUARDING PROCEDURES

Staff, practitioners, managers and leaders of local health services have responsibilities for the safety and well-being of all of their patients and they have particular duties for those patients who are less able to protect themselves from harm, exploitation, neglect or abuse. Trafford’s new Adult Safeguarding Procedures will support staff, practitioners, managers and leaders of local health services meet their responsibilities to those adults deemed to be at risk, they strengthen the multi-agency partnership that exists within Trafford, and across Greater Manchester, and are based on a solid evidence base.
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STUDENTS ATTITUDE IN ENGLISH AND VERNACULAR MEDIUM IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS

STUDENTS ATTITUDE IN ENGLISH AND VERNACULAR MEDIUM IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS

English is now taught as the ‘second language’ in schools in nearly every country in the world. In India, English was introduced by the British with the introduction of the east India Company in 1600. The Christian missionaries further popularized the use of English. Their network of English medium schools had a great impact and still continues. The decision of the British government to make English the official medium of education made English an important language. Before the introduction of English in India, each princely state had its own policy about the language of education. Hindi, Urdu, Sanskrit, Marathi and Persian were the languages of wider communication. But the introduction of Lord Macaulay’s Minute in 1835 changed the whole scene. Lord Macaulay’s Minute led to the use of English as the language of education in India during the British rule. Though the minute was criticized, still many Indian states have in fact sustained Macaulay’s programme. In 1857 the three English medium universities of Bombay, Calcutta and Madras were founded. With the coming up of these universities, the new educational policy emphasized the use of vernacular languages and also indicated that English should be taught only where there was a demand for it. But still English continued as an important component of education, administration and law. It was also used for personal use among the elite class. The impact of English did not decrease even after the departure of the British.
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Safeguarding Collections Management!

Safeguarding Collections Management!

record, but if I do a keyword search and then look at images, it will say "no image available" (because it did not create one larger than 2 mb. Well, there IS an image available[r]

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