Top PDF Scaling Up School and Community Partnerships

Scaling Up School and Community Partnerships

Scaling Up School and Community Partnerships

connection between in-school and out-of- school factors in student achievement. In- school factors are concerned with the quality of instruction and curriculum. It is commonly accepted that an effective teacher is the most important in-school factor affecting student achievement, vii but students also need a challenging curriculum that engages them as active learners in real-world problem-solving. viii Often, in the schools serving our neediest children, the curriculum is narrow and neither rigorous nor engaging. ix Classes are often unmanageably large, and instructional materials and supportive technologies are frequently limited. Worse still, neither the school climate nor adult behavior adequately communicates the expectation that every student will succeed. Out-of-school factors that affect a student’s ability to learn include residence in a high- poverty neighborhood, an unmarried teen mother, irregular attendance, and the ripple effects of family substance abuse and mental health issues, unemployment or frequent mobility, social isolation, poor health care and diet, and lack of educational support. Each of these factors has a pronounced impact on a child’s cognitive, emotional, social, and physical development.
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School-family-community (SFC) partnerships are. School Counselors Perceptions of Their Involvement in School- Family-Community Partnerships

School-family-community (SFC) partnerships are. School Counselors Perceptions of Their Involvement in School- Family-Community Partnerships

which six barriers hindered their involvement in school-family-community partnerships and (b) their willingness to be involved in nine partnership pro- grams. These questions were measured on a 5 point Likert scale with 1 = not at all, 2 = infrequently, 3 = frequently, 4 = very frequently, and 5 = all of the time. Question one had six sub-items each corre- sponding to a barrier that hindered school counselor involvement in school-family-community partner- ships. Counselors were asked to rate the degree of hindrance caused by each of the six barriers. For example, question one asked, “In your opinion, to what extent do these barriers keep you from being involved in school-family-community partnerships? (a) lack of time, (b) lack of opportunity, (c) too many counselor responsibilities, (d) lack of school policy, (e) inadequate training, (f) not consistent with school counselor’s role.”
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Circles of Influence: The Role of School-Community Partnerships in the Character Formation and Citizenship of Secondary School Students

Circles of Influence: The Role of School-Community Partnerships in the Character Formation and Citizenship of Secondary School Students

Predictably, there will be conflict about the potentially more diverse sets of values in the community (Nyberg, 1990; Ryan, 1999) than experienced in schools. Nyberg observes, “we will always have to live with conflict; we have no hope at all that everyone will agree on anything really important” (p. 596). Yet an introduction to such values diversity needs to be part of education if youth are to be prepared to interact with others in the community and to face life situations involving values conflicts. Exposure to diverse values and ac- knowledgment of any values conflicts encourages evaluations of the values and making choices between competing or conflicting values. Kohlberg (1975) and Berkowitz (1985) note that situations involving values conflicts are an essential component of moral education. Moral development is promoted if individuals’ moral reasoning is insufficient to resolve the dilemma but they possess a level of moral development to contribute substantially to a discussion of differences with their associates (Berkowitz; Kohlberg). This process entails reflection and is necessary for individuals to become critical thinkers, or reflec- tive agents, regarding their actions.
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Repoliticising and scaling-up ethical consumption: Lessons from public procurement for school meals in Brazil

Repoliticising and scaling-up ethical consumption: Lessons from public procurement for school meals in Brazil

As researchers we inadvertently carried with us an assumption about how the Brazilian school meals policy was framed. When choosing state procurement as an expression of collective choice, we implicitly assumed that citizens saw the policy makers in charge of procurement as accountable, directly or indirectly, to the citizens as voters. As the paper will show, we found little evidence of this link in people’s discourse. Instead of an understanding of a kind of voter- politician contractual politics, we instead found, in relation to public procurement and the school meals policy, a complex cultural politics of scale, intermingling with a politics of identity, expressed through food. The politics of public procurement will in each country be embedded in a specific social and political situation; however in principle key lessons should be transferable to any democratically governed country in which state representatives are asked to set the rules on buying goods and services on behalf of citizens.
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Raising Engagement and Enhancing Learning: School Community Partnerships That Work for Students at Promise

Raising Engagement and Enhancing Learning: School Community Partnerships That Work for Students at Promise

What makes this project so effective is that it bonds, bridges and links schools with their communities of practice which includes the university (Moll, Amanti, Neff, & Gonzalez, 1992). Social capital “has a major impact on student achievement and health” (Howard, 2006: p. 9), results in better school perform- ance (Leana & Pil, 2006; Plagens, 2003; Putnam, 1999), and en- hances the productive capacity of both individuals and groups (Croninger & Lee, 2001). Social capital can promote educa- tional achievement because community social capital influences students’ educational performance through the variety of pro- grams, organizations and activities available in the community. “Whenever there is a collective commitment by families, schools and communities to work in partnership… young people stay and succeed in school” (Israel & Beaulieu, 2004a: p. 50).
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DELIVERING MORE SCALING UP FARM TO SCHOOL PROGRAMS. Featuring a report on The Farm to School Distribution Learning Community

DELIVERING MORE SCALING UP FARM TO SCHOOL PROGRAMS. Featuring a report on The Farm to School Distribution Learning Community

have lost farms at rates approaching 20 percent in the last decade. The single largest infl uence on the North Carolina farm economy in recent years is the 2004 tobacco buyout—the Fair and Equitable Tran- sition Act. The legislation eliminated federal price support and supply control programs that had regulated tobacco production and marketing since the Great Depression era. It opened tobacco to an unregulated, free market system beginning with the 2005 crop. Payments to grow- ers and quota owners under the tobacco buyout are scheduled to take place over ten years, which means that the full effects of the buyout will not be known for some time. For North Carolina, number one in the U.S. in the production of tobacco with 36% to 38% of total tobacco production, the impact of the buyout has been and will continue to be dramatic. Some experts estimate that as many as fi ve out of six farmers growing tobacco will need to fi nd another way to earn a living and that the majority of small-scale farms growing tobacco under the old system will no longer be viable in the tobacco market. In Western North Carolina, with the tobacco buy-out looming, ASAP knew that there was a going to be a great need for markets in rural areas. Farm to school could meet that need and provide an opportunity for growers looking for markets.
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Extended School Year Extended School Day. Current Programs to Possibilities

Extended School Year Extended School Day. Current Programs to Possibilities

All students have access to extended learning/out-of- school learning experiences that support and enrich learning which strengthening community partnerships. Improve Student Achieveme[r]

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RLJ_MP FINAL.pdf

RLJ_MP FINAL.pdf

The second overarching goal is to cultivate sustainable school- community partnerships. There are three recommendations towards accomplishing this goal. The first of which is partnership preparation- identification and assessment phase. There are three strategies towards accomplishing this recommendation. The first strategy is to identify the most pressing barriers to academic and school success and to gain an in-depth understanding of the needs of students, families, and school staff. The key stakeholders are school leadership, school support staff, students, teachers, families, parishioners, and community members. The most pressing action steps towards this strategy is to conduct a needs assessment and gap analysis. Dryfoos, 205, p. 13 describes the process as follows; “A needs-and-resource assessment must be conducted to determine what already exists and what is needed. An oversight committee must be formed, representing teachers, support personnel, administrators, parents, and even students, as well as the community.”
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From rhetoric to practice : integrating sustainability with Tasmania's Essential Learnings Framework

From rhetoric to practice : integrating sustainability with Tasmania's Essential Learnings Framework

Although, each case study school employed strategies of place-based education, school/community partnerships and collaborative leadership in their attempts to deliver a whole-school inte[r]

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Scaling Up and Evaluation

Scaling Up and Evaluation

manage to reallocate their children from a class or a school without the program to a class or school with the program. Or conversely, individuals allocated to the treat- ment group may not receive the treatment, for example, because they decide not to take the program up. Even though the intended allocation of the program was ran- dom, the actual allocation is not. In particular, the program will appear to be more effective than it is in reality if individuals allocated to the program ex post also receive more of other types of resources, which is plausible. This concern is real, and evaluations certainly need to deal with it; however, it can be dealt with relatively eas- ily. Even though the initial assignment does not guarantee in this case that someone is actually either in the program or in the comparison group, in most cases it is at least more likely that someone is in the program group if he or she was initially allo- cated to it. The researcher can thus compare outcomes in the initially assigned group (this difference is often called the intention to treat estimate) and scale up the differ- ence by dividing it by the difference in the probability of receiving the treatment in those two groups (Imbens and Angrist 1994). Krueger’s (1999) reanalysis of the Tennessee student/teacher achievement ratio class size experiment used this method to deal with the fact that some parents had managed to reallocate their children from regular classes to small classes. 6 Such methods will provide an estimate of the aver-
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Scaling Up Nutrition:

Scaling Up Nutrition:

The Department for International Development (DFID) leads the UK government’s fight against world poverty. DFID has helped more than 250 million people lift themselves from poverty and helped 40 million more children to go to primary school. But there is still much to do to help make a fair, safe and sustainable world for all. Through its network of offices throughout the world, DFID works with governments of developing countries, charities, nongovernment organisations, businesses and international organisations, like the United Nations, European Commission and the World Bank, to eliminate global poverty and its causes. DFID also responds to overseas emergencies. DFID’s work forms part of a global promise, the eight UN Millennium Development Goals, for tackling elements of global poverty by 2015.
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Scaling Up Staying True

Scaling Up Staying True

that a scarcity of public funding has driven govern- ments to look for cost-effectiveness when considering new ideas. She said that when it comes to scaling up, “the number-one limiting factor is economics,” point- ing out that expanded learning programs are typically considered a supplement to the standard school day and therefore require decision makers to redirect fund- ing from elsewhere in their budgets or draw on outside resources such as philanthropic dollars and partner- ships with community organizations. This observation prompted Cooley to pose a central challenge for ex- panded learning providers: “How do you build up not only the consensus that [expanded learning is] doable and desirable but [also that] it’s necessary?”
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UP-SCALING FARMER FIELD SCHOOLS AND RAINFOREST ALLIANCE CERTIFICATION AMONG SMALLHOLDER TEA PRODUCERS IN KENYA: OPTIONS, OPPORTUNITIES AND EMERGING LESSONS

UP-SCALING FARMER FIELD SCHOOLS AND RAINFOREST ALLIANCE CERTIFICATION AMONG SMALLHOLDER TEA PRODUCERS IN KENYA: OPTIONS, OPPORTUNITIES AND EMERGING LESSONS

the research findings agree with those of eicher (2007) that the success of a farmer field school depends largely on the motivation and dedication of its participants. the suggestion to increase the number of farmer-led ffs and ra facilitators by employing/engaging ffs graduates permanently to train other farmers agrees with bunyatta et al. (2006) and rusike et al. (2004) that most ffs’s graduates are willing to share information with other farmers and to facilitate the formation of more ffs in their communities if given financial support. stigter (2010) proposed a strategy of up-scaling using farmer-led and partial self-funded ffss. the findings revealed that the presence of secure land tenure systems supported the ffs and ra certification scaling-up efforts which agree with the finding of the sustainable agriculture and rural development (2007). less than a third (30%) of the ffs groups had income generating activities yet income generating activities increase sustainability and effectiveness of the overall ffs approach because the proceeds to buy farm inputs, save in a cooperative society, buy food, buy tea seedlings for gaping and even hire farm labour. over 90% of the tea based ffs were facilitated by Ktda extension agent with 77% ffs members rating of the ffs facilitator’s expertise in guiding the ffs activities as high. this agrees with hartl (2009) and endalew (2009) assertion that the ffs facilitators must have skills to addressing farmers’ need, managing participatory, discovery-based learning as well as technical knowledge to guide the groups’ learning and action process, and help in reducing dependence of ffs groups on external support, besides up-scaling ffs coverage, increasing sustainability and effectiveness of the overall ffs approach.
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Scaling Up Nutrition: A Framework for Action

Scaling Up Nutrition: A Framework for Action

The second is by integrating nutrition — in other words, by including specific pro-nutrition actions — in programs in other sectors. For example, school curric- ula should include basic knowledge of good nutrition, including family nutrition practices. The closest links, though, are to food security and agriculture, health and social protection, which are three sectors in which the international development community recently launched high priority initiatives and in which there are opportunities to contribute directly to better nutri- tion outcomes. To take the case of agriculture, there is a need to incorporate nutrition interventions into smallholder agriculture and rural livelihoods programs, for example through encouraging home production of foods like fruits and vegetables and animal products that are rich in nutrients. Similarly, research should be intensified on biofortification as well as on increas- ing yields of nutrient-rich foods and of staple foods of the poor. ***** One powerful way to encourage more
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Community College and High School Partnerships

Community College and High School Partnerships

encouraged through federal and state-funded career-technical education (CTE) programs. Since 1990, federal funds have been set aside for Tech Prep programs as part of the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act and its re-authorizations. Tech Prep aims to improve student transition from secondary to postsecondary institutions by linking the last two years of high school with the first two years of college through technical programs that include rigorous academic content. Articulation agreements permit some high school students to take courses that allow them to earn college credit. Over 900 Tech Prep partnerships, or consortia, have been created, along with thousands of articulation agreements. 11 Tech Prep has been evolving, with stakeholders now promoting the term “career pathway” to refer to an updated ideal type of Tech Prep, and with the latest Perkins re-authorization defining Tech Prep as a “program of study.”
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Trenton Public Schools School Social Workers. Creating vital partnerships between: Children Home School Community

Trenton Public Schools School Social Workers. Creating vital partnerships between: Children Home School Community

– R340.1755 School Social Workers are liaisons with parents of children early childhood special education needs and services.. Helping children to: – Cope in times of crisis/stress[r]

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Ministry of Education. Learning Media Wellington

Ministry of Education. Learning Media Wellington

Many community agencies and services work hard to form partnerships with schools and with each other in order to meet local needs and provide quality physical activity support. However, as Gatman (2005) suggests, a growing number of individuals and organisations are “money-making enterprises, taking advantage of the societal concern with (physical) health”. Schools need to be discerning consumers and ask probing questions (see the list of questions under the heading Organisations That Can Help the School, page 48) when considering outside agency involvement in any physical activity or physical education programme.
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Safer School Partnerships

Safer School Partnerships

implemented in practice in different local contexts. These contexts are shaped by the structure of working relationships between the relevant parties as well as variations in the resources available. Within this, individual schools may have different needs, and heads in particular are likely to make individual choices about how they want to use the Safer School Partnership within the structure and ethos of their school. Local police forces will also have local policing priorities that will determine the way in which the programme is implemented and the particular model that is most appropriate to their needs. The development of neighbourhood policing means this will increasingly reflect local community priorities and concerns. See section 9 – Intervention levels.
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Articles | British Journal of Community Justice

Articles | British Journal of Community Justice

perpetrators and successful prevention may involve working with perpetrators and offering them opportunities to change – both inside and outside the criminal justice system. Working with many others, the Partnership has now succeeded in moving domestic violence firmly up the agenda, in principle if not always in practice. The approach was to start with local partnerships and forums, to engage the interest of practitioners, and make connections with work on related subjects such as bullying, child sexual abuse and attitudes towards health and relationships more generally. That approach has helped Thames Valley Probation to work more actively on domestic violence, and to do so in partnership with others and with a better understanding of the wider social context. But it is only after fourteen years of work in this field that the Partnership has really been able to focus on prevention and breaking the cycle. Its ‘No Joke!’ programme in secondary schools, linked to the national ‘Stop it Now!’ campaign for a radically different approach to child abuse, brought agencies together to design and deliver a whole-school approach to domestic violence and its prevention, taking the implications for children into the mainstream of provision for responsible authorities and seeking to engage the wider local community. Agencies are beginning to focus more effectively on prevention and breaking the cycle, but for many of them a focus on prevention is still not on the agenda and there is too often an absence of strategic leadership. Nor is there so far enough recognition of the effects of domestic violence on children, for example on their behaviour and achievement at school, their relationships, their sexual and mental health, and their attitudes to violence more generally.
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Scaling up community-based goat breeding programmes via multi-stakeholder collaboration

Scaling up community-based goat breeding programmes via multi-stakeholder collaboration

In the framework of Feed the Future Initiative, funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and led by United States Department of Agricul- ture (USDA) in collaboration with the African Goat Im- provement Network (AGIN), goat CBBPs were introduced in Mzimba and Nsanje districts in Malawi and in Hoima and Nakapiripirit districts in Uganda in 2014. The goal of the programme was to improve production and productiv- ity of indigenous goats through selective breeding, improved nutrition and animal healthcare. The model integrates sci- entific and indigenous knowledge where selection of breed- ing bucks is based on statistical data and farmers’ visual ap- praisals (Gutu et al., 2015; Haile et al., 2018) of the selected candidates for the predefined traits. Preliminary evaluations of the programme in the two countries show: elimination of ‘negative selection’ (where fast growing animals are sold out for slaughter leaving inferior ones for breeding), improved average 6-month live weight (average of 16 to 19 kg), in- creased percentage of kid survival (72 to 89 %), improved twining rates (8.2 to 16.7 %) and improved prices ( € 21.6 to € 30.1) per adult animal (unpublished reports). Elsewhere, similar CBBPs for dairy goats (Mexico and Kenya), sheep (Ethiopia and Peru), Angora goats (Argentina) and local pigs (Vietnam) have shown that not only is the approach e ff ec- tive in genetic improvement, but it builds local capacity and ownership and can be very sustainable given the right level of organisation and support among the participating farmers (Mueller et al., 2015; Gutu et al., 2015). Hence scaling up the CBBP initiative has recently received strong support be- cause of the evidence-based results which have demonstrated that this participatory model can help smallholder farmers implement and build CBBPs that are sustainable and poten- tially scalable over time. The purpose of this paper was to explore strategies for scaling up goat CBBPs in Malawi and Uganda, to provide a description of the process and to docu- ment challenges encountered and lessons learned for future improvement of similar endeavours. Di ff erent definitions and dimensions of scaling up were drawn from literature. The paper concludes by discussing and recommending key requirements that need to be in place for successful scaling up of CBBPs and sustainability of the associated positive im- pacts to smallholder livestock farmers.
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