Top PDF Out of school care : survey of parents in Scotland

Out of school care : survey of parents in Scotland

Out of school care : survey of parents in Scotland

• The main reason non-users said they would use breakfast clubs and after- school club was to allow them/their partner to work. It could be that parents who said they were not interested in using affordable, formal out-of-school care were considering these services primarily as childcare to enable them to work, rather than as opportunities for their child to participate in extracurricular activities, and so may not have reflected on whether access to out-of-school care could have other benefits. However, since the survey was designed to be brief and straightforward, it was unable to probe in depth into the reasons parents did not use out-of-school care.
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Food and drink purchasing habits out of school at lunchtime: a national survey of secondary school pupils in Scotland.

Food and drink purchasing habits out of school at lunchtime: a national survey of secondary school pupils in Scotland.

Food purchasing habits The FPH module for secondary school pupils comprised a combination of interviewer administered questions and a self-completion questionnaire [20]. A self-completion questionnaire was used because the interview was con- ducted in the presence of a parent or guardian and it was thought that some questions could be sensitive, for ex- ample some parents may not be aware their child was purchasing food or drinks out of school. The FPH mod- ule was designed for this survey and pre-tested using cognitive interviewing techniques to ensure usability and correct interpretation of the questions. It included ques- tions about the pupil’s perceived opportunities to pur- chase food or drinks out of school, reported purchasing of food or drinks out of school, a description of the places food or drinks were purchased from and the reasons for choosing to purchase food or drink out of school. The majority of the questions were closed answer lists, which were developed using a combination of expert knowledge and feedback from the pilot interviews. Free text space was included for pupils to add an option not listed. When answering the questions pupils were asked to con- sider their purchasing habits in “a usual school week”. Purchases only included items bought by the pupil for themselves, and not items bought for them by other people.
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Food and drink purchasing habits out of school at lunchtime: a national survey of secondary school pupils in Scotland

Food and drink purchasing habits out of school at lunchtime: a national survey of secondary school pupils in Scotland

Food purchasing habits The FPH module for secondary school pupils comprised a combination of interviewer administered questions and a self-completion questionnaire [20]. A self-completion questionnaire was used because the interview was con- ducted in the presence of a parent or guardian and it was thought that some questions could be sensitive, for ex- ample some parents may not be aware their child was purchasing food or drinks out of school. The FPH mod- ule was designed for this survey and pre-tested using cognitive interviewing techniques to ensure usability and correct interpretation of the questions. It included ques- tions about the pupil’s perceived opportunities to pur- chase food or drinks out of school, reported purchasing of food or drinks out of school, a description of the places food or drinks were purchased from and the reasons for choosing to purchase food or drink out of school. The majority of the questions were closed answer lists, which were developed using a combination of expert knowledge and feedback from the pilot interviews. Free text space was included for pupils to add an option not listed. When answering the questions pupils were asked to con- sider their purchasing habits in “a usual school week”. Purchases only included items bought by the pupil for themselves, and not items bought for them by other people.
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Knottin School Out of School Care Centre. Out of School Care Enrolment Agreement

Knottin School Out of School Care Centre. Out of School Care Enrolment Agreement

The Parent/Guardian must complete the contract and applicable forms prior to the admission of child. The starting date of the child care services will be ____________ The Parents/Guardians hereby certify that the Child is in their lawful custody and that there is no person whose consent is required for the enrolment of the Child in the program. Should family circumstances change during the Child’s enrolment in the program immediate notification and proper access and/or custody-related documentation is required. Failure to provide the documents to the Centre may result in the termination of this contract.
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An Orthodontist Day Out - Awareness & Desire for Orthodontic Treatment
in School Children & Their
Parents - A Household Survey

An Orthodontist Day Out - Awareness & Desire for Orthodontic Treatment in School Children & Their Parents - A Household Survey

found to vary in different areas of India ranging from 20-43%. Globally there has been an increase in the awareness of orthodontics as a dental speciality among children as well as adults. [3] This increased awareness could be attributed to several factors-particularly increase in the value placed on dental aesthetics& physical appearance. Aesthetic awareness has also been associated with increasing influence of the entertainment media. People are fascinated by the beautiful & confident smiles of models and public figures in popular media & are thus motivated to improve their appearance. [6] Children & adolescents compromise the bulk of orthodontic patients. Consequently, their parents may have are important role in treatment commencement & compliance until the end of it. It has been shown that the most important factor of motivation for orthodontic treatment is parents. [4] It has been recognised that individuals malocclusion might develop feeling of shame arrangement, and
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OUT OF SCHOOL HOURS CARE

OUT OF SCHOOL HOURS CARE

OSHC BEHAVIOUR CODE POLICY We believe students and staff have the right to a safe and caring environment. Through our programs, students will learn self-discipline, a sense of self-worth, self-control, social skills, problem solving and conflict resolution skills. A consistent whole school approach is the most suitable way to manage student behaviour. Students need opportunities to learn appropriate behaviour and accept responsibility for their own behaviour. Students need to be taught and therefore understand and experience their rights and responsibilities, to enable them to learn the necessary skills to become effective members of a democratic society. A partnership between Parents, Students and Staff will effectively reinforce expectations and consequences related to student behaviour.
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Out of School Hours Care

Out of School Hours Care

Refer to Appendix No. 2 for priming instructions. Note: LiteAire and La Petite spacers are made from non-static material and therefore do not require priming. All children with asthma should have readily available access to their own asthma first aid medication and asthma medication device. It is important the OSHC service request that parents provide their child’s asthma first aid medication and device in accordance with the current National Regulations. Whilst it is preferable for the child to use their own reliever medication puffer and spacer device, in an emergency situation where time is crucial, the service asthma first aid kit may be the most relevant equipment to use if this is more readily accessible.
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Is maternity care in Scotland equitable? Results of a national maternity care survey

Is maternity care in Scotland equitable? Results of a national maternity care survey

We carried out a prespecified plan to use linear mixed effect multilevel models with demographic covariates fitted as fixed effects and hospital (for hospital outcomes) or health board level (for community outcomes) fitted as random effects. In this way, variability at the hospital or health board level was taken into account when esti- mating the effect of independent variables. Analyses were carried out to examine the sensitivity of fitting geographic variables as either fixed or random effects. Dichotomous responses were analysed using binary logistic regression and ordinal outcomes with ordered logistic regression, with ORs estimated with 95% CIs for all outcomes. Penal- ised likelihood logistic regression was used if there was perfection prediction. 34 Significance was determined
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The Provision of Out of School Care in Bulgaria

The Provision of Out of School Care in Bulgaria

(2007) indicate some specifics for the family and gender behaviour in regard to child care. According to M. Nikolova, fathers spend 65 minutes per day on child care in the total balance of time for home activities, while mothers spend 115 minutes per day. This fact outlines that women are almost twice more engaged in child care. However, the survey does not specify whether this care concerns out-of school activities. Further the study underlines that 22.1% of working women aged 21-30 spend over 3 hours per day on child care, as well as 21.3% of working women aged 31-40 and 11.8% of women aged 41-50. 8 It is also interesting to point out that according to the same study, the higher the education of the mother is, the more the time spent on child care in institution is. This means that women with higher education are more reluctant to go back to work after the birth of the child in comparison with less educated mothers. In this respect, the active labour market policy has designed some policies, aiming at encouraging the labour market reintegration of less educated and qualified young mothers.
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Residential care and care to community-dwelling parents: out-selection, in-selection and diffusion of responsibility

Residential care and care to community-dwelling parents: out-selection, in-selection and diffusion of responsibility

The mechanisms underlying the negative association between the availability of residential care and the provision of care to community-dwelling older parents by their adult children have thus far not been explicated and tested. Pickard (2012) and Ulmanen and Szebehely (2015) have suggested that this negative association may in part be mediated by the levels of care needs among community- dwelling parents. Consistent with this idea, Haberkern and Szydlik’s (2010) cross-national analysis of intergenerational care provision in Europe showed a negative association between the availability of residential care and care provision from adult children to their parents that was no longer statistically significant in a multivariate model which controlled for many characteristics of the parent and the adult child, including the parent’s physical limitations. The studies summed up here, while providing valuable suggestions for a potential explanation of the negative association between the availability of residential care and intergenerational caregiving to community-dwelling older parents, do not provide a direct test of the supposed underlying mechanism. Furthermore, additional theoretical explanations can be developed and tested. The current study is a first attempt to do so. We use data from the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe enriched with country level information from the
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SURVEY CONCERNING THE USE OF OUT-OF-SCHOOL CARE FOR CHILDREN AGED BETWEEN 3 AND 12 YEARS

SURVEY CONCERNING THE USE OF OUT-OF-SCHOOL CARE FOR CHILDREN AGED BETWEEN 3 AND 12 YEARS

The 1999 HIVA (Higher Institute for Labour) survey included children up to the age of 12 years, and divided them into three separate subpopulations, i.e. children aged between 3 months and 2 ½ years, children aged between 2 ½ and 6 years and children aged between 6 and 12 years. Unlike the 2002 survey, this survey was conducted by means of a written questionnaire and was based on a different list of questions. Especially for the two eldest subpopulations the number of children was rather limited. A sample survey of 809 respondents can indicate general tendencies but a larger sample size is required in order to include a subdivision of the distribution according to the province and district. Whereas a sample survey of minimum 5000 respondents has a 2% margin of error, a sample survey of 222 respondents aged between 6 and 12 years has a 7% margin of error.
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School Selection for Students in Out-of-Home Care

School Selection for Students in Out-of-Home Care

In order for parents or other educational decision makers to make informed decisions about selecting the school that is in a child’s best interest, they need to have as much practical information as possible. Every LEA has a local homeless education liaison, who must ensure each eligible child receives his or her rights under the McKinney-Vento Act, including the right to attend the school of origin. The local liaison and school or district staff can play an instrumental role in assisting with choosing the school that is in a student’s best interest. For children in foster care who are not McKinney-Vento eligible, schools should identify staff to assist with the school selection provisions of the Fostering Connections Act. In these situations state laws and policies will determine the schools’ specific role in best interest decisions; however, school staff always should be involved and provide input related to the decisions.
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Management of anaphylaxis in children: a survey of parents and school personnel in Qatar

Management of anaphylaxis in children: a survey of parents and school personnel in Qatar

Background Allergies are a growing health concern with a significant impact on quality of life and healthcare costs. It is critical to develop an appropriate care plan to deal with children’s allergies. This study aimed to assess and compare the knowledge and perception of families and school personnel caring for children with history of anaphylaxis who were prescribed the epinephrine autoinjector (EpiPen). The study also examined the underlying reasons for any observed knowledge gaps. Methods A cross-sectional study of 128 families and 50 corresponding school personnel caring for children at risk of anaphylaxis who had been prescribed the EpiPen was conducted. The primary outcome was to identify any knowledge deficiency within family and school personnel and the reasons behind knowledge gaps.
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Parents working out work

Parents working out work

Formal care or ECE was very common among children in the 3–5 year age group. The use of formal care and ECE also grew significantly over time for 11 The main objective of ECE is to provide an early education for children, to help prepare them for school, and so differs from other formal care. While ECE hours may not match the hours of employment for all mothers, they can nevertheless provide some opportunities for mothers to use that time to undertake paid work.

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OUT OF SCHOOL HOURS CARE PARENT INFORMATION HANDBOOK

OUT OF SCHOOL HOURS CARE PARENT INFORMATION HANDBOOK

Treats with respect: children, parents, educators and relevant community members and their views in relation to the proper operation of RGGS OSHC are considered and valued Recognises and respects parents as primarily responsible for the upbringing, protection and development of their children. RGGS OSHC aims to support parents in that role, and believe that respectful, collaborative relationships strengthen the capacity and efforts of families and RGGS services to support their children and promote each child’s health and well-being to the greatest extent reasonable possible
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How To Run An Out Of School Hours Care Service

How To Run An Out Of School Hours Care Service

MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE POLICY _____________________________________________________________________ The Mount Barker South Out of School Hours Care Service will provide a quality service and will operate according to all legal requirements. It will make every effort to reflect the special nature of the community and will encourage parent input and take into account the needs of children, parents, and educators in the operation of the service. The operator/management committee will ensure that decisions are made in a proper way (in accordance with its constitution) and in the best interests of the
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Experiences of Education, Health and Care plans: A survey of parents and young people

Experiences of Education, Health and Care plans: A survey of parents and young people

The data tables were analysed with consideration given to the original research objectives and the questions that the research set out to answer. 40 Analysis on areas with high/low numbers of SEND Tribunal appeals has been calculated at the local authority level, as the number of registered SEND Tribunal appeals in the 2015/16 academic year, per 10,000 of the population aged 0-18 in 2015. The data used is the most current available at the time of analysis. The population group has been taken as the best feasible proxy of the population of the potential total number of appeals per local authority area i.e. all those aged 0-18 who may be eligible for an EHC plan, and considers appeals as a result of refusal to carry out the EHC needs assessment. While the time periods used do not exactly match up – the 2015/16 academic year and 2015 calendar year – SEND Tribunal data is only available on an academic year basis, and given the potential lag between going through the EHC needs assessment and planning process it was felt that using this data was a sufficiently accurate proxy for the time period for the survey.
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Experiences of Education, Health and Care plans: A survey of parents and young people

Experiences of Education, Health and Care plans: A survey of parents and young people

2.1.1 EHC plan data classification errors This starting sample included records for some individuals who did not actually have EHC plans. This was because some education providers had misunderstood how pupils with SEN should be recorded in the school census following changes to support for them set out in the Children and Families Act 2014. New SEN data categories were introduced to the school census: ‘SEN Support’ and ‘EHC plan’. Children with SEN whose needs were being met without a SEN Statement (i.e. those receiving School Action and School Action Plus) were to be re-classified into the new ‘SEN Support’ category. Those pupils with SEN Statements were to be re-classified to the ‘EHC plan’ category, after they had transferred from a SEN Statement to an EHC plan (following an EHC needs
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Quality of Life as reported by school children and their parents: a cross-sectional survey

Quality of Life as reported by school children and their parents: a cross-sectional survey

The ILC consisting of 7 items, could also be a good alter- native to a longer instrument, where the main purpose would be to obtain a reliable overall child report; for example, in a busy clinical context with disordered chil- dren who experience problems filling out longer instru- ments. The ILC can also be used in broad-scaled epidemiological surveys, where instruments cannot be too long but must still provide reliable scores. Where it is not possible to provide self-reports on child QoL [16], either due to the young age of the child or to other circum- stances, both the Norwegian ILC and the KINDL parent version may be used given their satisfactory internal con- sistency. However, one must bear in mind that the corre- lations between child and parent reports of child total QoL are only low to moderate. Consequently, parent eval- uation of child QoL cannot represent a real substitute for the child's own perspective.
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Changes in out of home care and permanence planning among young children in Scotland, 2003 to 2017.

Changes in out of home care and permanence planning among young children in Scotland, 2003 to 2017.

intervention, in the form of out of home care, in England, as well as Australia and Canada, but thus far we do not know whether early out of home care is increasing in Scotland. Furthermore, there is no research investigating whether rates of permanence planning have changed anywhere in the UK. The current study addressed these gaps through a comparison of two samples of children in Scotland: 110 children born in 2003, and 117 born in 2013, all of whom were placed under compulsory measures of supervision prior to three years of age. The 2013 cohort was significantly more likely than the 2003 cohort to be removed from their parents at birth; to reside away from parents throughout the first three years of life; and to reside away from parents at three years of age. Significantly more of the 2013 cohort than the 2003 cohort had a plan for permanence by three years. These findings are consistent with the view that policy changes in the UK are impacting practice (although practice changes may have resulted from other sources as well / instead). The fall in parental care was largely compensated by an increase in the use of foster care, which has resource implications. Children removed from their parents at birth were usually not returned in the first three years of life, not raised by extended family members, and were separated from one or more siblings. This typically reduced instability for young children, but also entailed substantial birth family fragmentation. The impact on children and families of early removal into foster care must therefore be carefully assessed in light of the increasing prevalence of this practice in Scotland and elsewhere.
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