Top PDF School revenue balances in England

School revenue balances in England

School revenue balances in England

The second key issue is just how much of the money is genuinely in scope for clawback. While the balances may be ‘excessive’ much of the amount is ‘committed’, that is to say that a specific purpose for that money has already been identified – for example, as part of investment into large capital projects. DfE statistics show that around half of all revenue balances are ‘committed’. If we apply the excessive threshold only to those uncommitted surplus balances, we estimate that this would yield around £250m.At a national level, however, this is still higher than the total of deficit balances. The third point is the extent to which schools with surplus balances may be opposed to such measures as the mechanism risks rewarding poorly managed, inefficient schools, at the expense of those that have been efficient over a number of years. It may also introduce perverse incentives in those schools to spend money quickly ahead of money being clawed back.
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Local authority and school expenditure on education, children's services and social care for 2010-11, including school revenue balances

Local authority and school expenditure on education, children's services and social care for 2010-11, including school revenue balances

Tables 2, 3 and 4 present statistics for England (Table 6 provides some data for each individual LA) showing the central LA expenditure on education, and on children and young people’s services and social care. For example, it shows expenditure on youth justice, youth work, children looked after, children and young people’s safety, family support and other children’s and family services, children’s services strategy and child trust fund top-ups. Between 2009-10 and 2010-11 there have been several changes to the information collected in this area. Due to these changes it has not been possible to provide year on year comparisons for all of the children and young people’s services data. This is because some of the categories and sub-totals are not directly comparable, either because individual categories have been dropped completely from the collection (between 2009-10 and 2010-11) or because categories have moved between expenditure groups. Table 4 provides some year on year changes by rebasing the 2009-10 data, where possible, to aid comparisons with the new 2010-11 categories. The changes are described in more detail in the Technical Notes.
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School funding pressures in England

School funding pressures in England

Deficit statistics used in this report are those for local authority maintained primary and secondary schools, because the information for academies is currently not publicly available. However, we intend to look more closely at information for academies in the future, as data becomes available. It is clear from this report and other recent analysis that after a period of significant real rises in school funding under the Blair and Brown governments (from 1997-2010), and protected real budgets under the 2010-2015 Coalition, we are presently in a period where in many schools, annual budget changes are not keeping pace with inflationary pressures. A majority of both primary and secondary maintained schools spent more than they received in income in 2016-17. This would not automatically be a cause for worry – for many years schools built up large reserve balances.
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School funding in England : current system and proposals for 'fairer school funding'

School funding in England : current system and proposals for 'fairer school funding'

Nearly all correspondents (98%) agreed with some or all of the stated characteristics of an ideal school funding system. Some respondents raised issues about the balance between a simple and transparent system and one that is able to include the diverse needs of individual schools. Whilst most respondents agreed that transparency should be an aim of a future funding system and recognised the complex nature of the current system, some however felt that it was more important to ensure that the funding system is fit for purpose and able to meet the needs of all children. 21

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School restructuring in England : new school configurations and new challenges

School restructuring in England : new school configurations and new challenges

Third, national chains have not achieved significant purchase in any of the LAs, especially since 2010. The preference for key actors in each LA seems to have been to establish school groups with more local roots. A significant development is the emergence of regional and local groupings. These vary widely in their initiation (top-down or mutually constructed), their ‘leadership’ (focused on a not-for-profit organisation or an individual lead school), their size and their composition. This was most noticeable in City where the LA actively attempted to influence patterns emerging locally towards groupings led by high performing local schools (for a fuller discussion see Simkins et al, 2014). In contrast, in County where the LA’s position was less assertive about solutions a wide variety of groups was emerging including both those led by local schools and by regionally-based non-profit organisations. One of the consequences in County was that particular groupings were emerging in dominant positions in various localities.
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Checks & Balances

Checks & Balances

-36- "CHECKS & sync - BALANCES" requires mosna- no mos sync Scene - 1- sound 1- in 2- shot 3- shot 4- shot 5- shot 6- shot 7- shot 7A- order - 2/20/74 shot not but required, mosna, moder[r]

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School places in England : applications, allocations and appeals

School places in England : applications, allocations and appeals

There are special provisions in the admissions code relating to children of crown servants returning from overseas and children of serving members of the armed forces with a confirmed new posting. For families in this situation, the admissions code requires admission authorities to provide school places in advance of arriving in the area, providing certain documentary evidence is supplied. 7

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The Impact of National Culture on School Leadership in England

The Impact of National Culture on School Leadership in England

There was a significantly different response to this issue from the two women, with the head of School B describing a number of examples where her gender made a real difference to her job. Headteachers within the same school district usually join themselves into a local association which not only deals with both professional issues, but also tends to have a social side. She was only the seventh woman to become head of a secondary school in the LEA when she first joined and found herself in male dominated group, where the women were outnumbered something like eight to one. Amongst her early experiences was the annual dinner when the men began to sing the type of bawdy songs usually associated with all male environments, such as fraternity houses. The decision by the women to walk out of the dinner caused an animated debate that lasted well into the night between men who thought that they had offended ‘ladies’ and the women who felt that they were not offended, but thought it a stupid way to behave. The strong male culture of this LEA has now broken down substantially as 13 men have left their post in the last four years and, in 12 instances, have been replaced by women - not as part of a deliberate policy, but more because the quality of woman candidates has been better. Nevertheless she was still able to report of depressingly similar circumstances to those experienced on her induction in a different region of the country where, as a guest speaker at a conference for secondary headteachers, her credentials for the position as head of a school were questioned by an almost exclusively male audience. Her major concern was summed up as a fear for the children seeing this type of behaviour as a role model:
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School Choice in England: Background Facts

School Choice in England: Background Facts

The school choice reforms face a number of difficulties in achieving their aims. Responses of schools and parents will be important. Will the target schools – the schools that newly empowered parents want to choose – be willing and able to expand? There are practical difficulties in increasing the number of places, but there may also be questions about the desire to do so. To the extent that a school’s position in the league tables depends on the attainment of its intake, schools may be unwilling to increase and potentially dilute the quality of their student body. At the root of this is the question ‘what makes a good school good’? If it is mostly attributes that can be readily extended (such as leadership and ethos), then increasing entry should not be a major problem; if it is attributes inherent in the intake (such as the ability of peer groups) then this policy is more problematic.
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The state of school governing in England 2014

The state of school governing in England 2014

Second, governing body capability in the appointment of headteacher/ senior staff appointments needs to be secure given its importance to the school and its surprisingly widespread prevalence in the data as a recent governing body task. This aspect of governors’ work is not well supported by the system. Arguably, training in this aspect should be an on-going priority in order to ensure that all governing bodies have the capability in sound and proper recruitment practices when they need it. Third, the levels of both challenge and support governing bodies give to headteachers are higher than they were in 2008, which indicates a significant improvement in governing body functioning. The challenge function has been championed by many, including the DfE and NGA, since the last survey and the increase the level of challenge may explain this emphasis.
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School Meals in Secondary Schools in England

School Meals in Secondary Schools in England

Fieldwork was conducted during the period October to November 2003. Two interviewers from the National Centre for Social Research (NatCen) visited the school over five consecutive lunchtimes and recorded the foods and beverages on offer from the caterers. The food and beverage choices of up to 15 pupils were recorded each lunchtime and their leftovers were weighed. A total of 5 695 pupils provided information on food eaten and completed a brief interviewer administered questionnaire. Information on catering practice and the lunch service was collected via a telephone interview with the head cook or catering manager. Information on the type of contract for each school was collected via a telephone interview with the relevant person (school Head teacher/Bursar, LEA, contract caterer). A copy of the specifications or service level agreement was obtained from 48 schools. A pilot study to test measuring instruments and logistics was conducted in ten schools prior to the mainstage study. 1.4 National Nutritional Standards: historical perspective
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Recent school improvement measures in England

Recent school improvement measures in England

Extended schools are another, very recent, US import, but this time a more fruitful one than Reconstitution, firstly designed to involve parents, especially in economically disadvantaged areas, to become more engaged in their children's’ education and secondly to provide specialist intervention at the point where it is often first perceived to be needed, i.e. at school level. Such schools offer a range of community services - social workers, health professional, debt councillors, police and community safety officers. The idea is still in it infancy and still has to be extensively evaluated. The Local Government Association is at present conducting an assessment of its pathfinder scheme in this area, but has not yet reported. I visited a primary school in Sefton, a particularly deprived area of Merseyside (just outside Liverpool) where the headteacher and his staff have worked particularly hard to build up a good relationship with parents. Training in structured play activity was offered to parents of young children's from year 1 to 3. This has helped forge good relationships and build up the confidence of parents who were often failed by their own school education. There has been a huge rise in school test results but within the context of a broad curriculum and a caring environment. However, this school is a faith school which attracts its pupils from an already close-knit and supportive environment.
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School admissions in England : state-funded schools

School admissions in England : state-funded schools

Section 5 of the school admissions code describes possible further avenues for complaint following an appeal in certain circumstances. Where there is evidence that a school place has been refused because of some unfairness or mistake by the admission authority or a school admissions appeal has been handled incorrectly, the Local Government Ombudsman (LGO) or the Education Funding Agency (EFA) may be able to consider a complaint. The LGO can only consider complaints about admission to community, foundation, voluntary aided, voluntary controlled or nursery school or convertor academies where the conversion took place during the admissions process. Complaints relating to other academies and free schools are handled by the EFA. This is not another level of appeal and the LGO or EFA cannot question decisions if they were taken properly and fairly by the admission authority or the appeal panel. The LGO website article on complaining about school admissions, updated 4 February 2015 provides information about making complaints in relation to school admissions. Information
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Establishing the current state of school leadership in England

Establishing the current state of school leadership in England

methods (both face-to-face and online, or ‘blended’ learning - see NCSL, 2001), the College will also take full responsibility for the existing national training programmes for headship. In undertaking these duties, the College will become a significant pace- and tone-setter for school leadership thinking in this country, eclipsing the role previously enjoyed in this area by local education authorities and institutions of higher education. The role of the NCSL is complemented by other related policy directives, such as the Government’s new framework for continuing professional development (CPD), Learning and Teaching: A Strategy for Professional Development (DfEE, 2001a). Backed by £90 million over three years, this will make provision for a series of development initiatives, including opportunities for experienced teachers to take sabbaticals and increased CPD for those in the second and third year of teaching. While these initiatives will not always or necessarily directly engage with issues strictly to do with leadership, they will provide opportunities for them to be explored by teachers thinking along such lines. Either way, these reforms are contributing to a new sense of urgency in the development of further quality professional development opportunities for school leaders. This approach has been significantly re-engineered through the establishment of national benchmarks and standards for not only headteachers, but also newly qualified teachers, subject leaders and special educational needs co-ordinators (TTA, 1998), as well as moves to ‘fast track’ exceptional new entrants to teaching so that they progress speedily from NQT status to headship.
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Follow-up research into the state of school leadership in England

Follow-up research into the state of school leadership in England

Some progress appears to have been made in terms of preparing school leaders for headship, albeit only slight. Given how important feeling prepared for headship appears to be in terms of affecting school leaders’ perceptions of a whole range of issues, this is a key area to continue to improve upon. Indeed, it is interesting to note that school leaders appear to believe they were more prepared before they actually took up their post than when they actually did. Headteachers and other school leaders participate in a range of training and development opportunities, particularly through their LEAs. The qualitative research highlighted headteachers’ difficulties in choosing which training to attend, particularly because of varying quality and varying cost. Some headteachers use recommendations and testimonials from other headteachers as a guide, but there may be scope for LEAs or the DfES to play a role in this, perhaps by collating feedback from attendees. Headteachers are, however, generally satisfied with the support they receive in their role, particularly from staff and governors within their school. That said, satisfaction is lower in regards to the support they receive from their LEAs and from higher education institutions.
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The school curriculum and SATs in England: reforms since 2010

The school curriculum and SATs in England: reforms since 2010

“Despite the school year starting over five months ago, the required ‘exemplifications’ for the teacher assessment of writing have only just been released to schools. The workload implications of the evidence requirements are immense and will be frankly unachievable for many. The requirement for pupils to produce such a large amount of evidence with half the academic year already gone will almost certainly lead to time being used up in all other areas of the curriculum to achieve the required results.

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The School Governance (Miscellaneous Amendments) (England) Regulations 2015

The School Governance (Miscellaneous Amendments) (England) Regulations 2015

(2) In regulation 3(1) (interpretation), after the definition of “school teacher”, insert— ““temporary co-opted governor” has the meaning given in regulation 15(5); “temporary governor” means a member of a temporary governing body”. (3) In regulation 7 (temporary parent governors)(b), after paragraph (2), insert—

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School admissions in England : state-funded mainstream schools

School admissions in England : state-funded mainstream schools

Where oversubscribed, schools designated with a religious character (‘faith’ schools) are allowed to use faith-based oversubscription criteria to give higher priority to children of the faith than children of other faiths or of no faith. Where they do so, they must give highest priority to children of the faith who are looked after (in care) or who were previously looked after, as defined in the admissions code. Where there are fewer applicants than places (i.e., a school is undersubscribed) all applicants must be given a place without reference to faith; schools cannot refuse a place solely on the basis that a child is not of the relevant (or any) faith.
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School meals and milk in England and Wales, 1906 45

School meals and milk in England and Wales, 1906 45

John Welshman just, to stave off deterioration in health and physique", but throughout the 1930s the Board remained concerned that Abertillery was a high spending LEA.65 Deputations from[r]

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A study of school attendance and exclusions in secondary schools in England

A study of school attendance and exclusions in secondary schools in England

An analysis by the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) showed that England is a country suffering from high exclusion rates (économiques, 2017). Media reports have shown how the issue of school exclusions is deteriorating and becoming more complex. For example, TES claimed recently that “permanent exclusions have skyrocketed by as much as 300% in a year” (Bloom, 2017). According to the same source, the rapid increase in school permanent exclusion rates where children are permanently expelled from school was due to financial and academic pressures on schools. Another report, this time in the Guardian newspaper and titled, ‘She deserves an education: outcry as academy excludes 41% of pupils’ (Perraudin & McIntyre, 2018) raised concerns about the increase in fixed-term exclusions within schools in England where children are suspended from school for a period of time. The Guardian newspaper also reported an article under the title ‘Wild west system of school exclusions is failing pupils, say MPs’ (Weale, 2018). In sum, from some quarters school exclusions were actually viewed as worsening the situation instead of contributing to a solution to behavioural problems, as the policy was intended to promote. School exclusions seemed to be divesting excluded pupils from their right to an education. According to Timpson’s review recently published by the DfE, "Exclusion from school should never mean exclusion from education”. (DfE, 2019b, p. 6). The author called for a more consistent approach that ensures a good education for all children despite their needs and type of schools they attend.
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