Top PDF School Teachers’ Review Body: Twenty-Ninth Report, 2019

School Teachers’ Review Body: Twenty-Ninth Report, 2019

School Teachers’ Review Body: Twenty-Ninth Report, 2019

2.43 As set out above in paragraph 2.6, a number of consultees voiced concerns about the emphasis on affordability in the remit letter and noted that overall school funding for 2020-21 onward would be determined in the Government’s upcoming Spending Review. Several consultees proposed that, given this context, the STRB should make observations or recommendations about the level of funding required by the school system in England. The joint submission from ASCL, NAHT, the NEU and Voice stated that this lack of clarity on Government funding plans provided an “ideal opportunity” for the STRB to set out the action necessary to comprehensively address teacher supply problems. This proposal was expanded on in the individual submissions from some of these organisations. For example, the NEU asserted that this would give the STRB the opportunity to contribute to the debate about public spending by setting out “its views on the level of investment required for teachers’ pay”. In their supplementary submissions, several consultees addressed the Department’s assessment that there could be a 2 per cent increase in per teacher pay in September 2019 without schools facing additional cost pressures. The joint supplementary submission from ASCL, NAHT, the NEU and Voice asserted that the Government’s statement was both a complete failure to engage with the key issues and an inappropriate attempt to constrain the STRB in its deliberations. In its individual supplementary submission, ASCL challenged several of the assumptions that underpinned the Department’s calculation and modelled the costs of an unfunded 2 per cent pay uplift on a secondary school. On the basis of its own calculations, ASCL asserted that the 0.6 per cent increase in costs that the Department maintained to be affordable nationally would not cover the cost of a 2 per cent pay award. The NASUWT contended that the Secretary of State had effectively set a 2 per cent pay cap for teachers through its assessment of affordability and noted that the Department’s calculations did not take account of schools’ financial reserves. During oral representations, all consultees, other than the Department, stated that it was very difficult or impossible to calculate affordability across the school system as a whole. All told us that they did not accept the Department’s calculation that a 2 per cent increase in per teacher pay was affordable as an accurate assessment of schools’ current financial situations.
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School Teachers’ Review Body: Twenty-Ninth Report, 2019

School Teachers’ Review Body: Twenty-Ninth Report, 2019

assessment of what adjustments should be made to the salary and allowance ranges for classroom teachers, unqualified teachers and school leaders to promote recruitment and retention, within the bounds of affordability across the school system as a whole. He asked us, when considering our recommendations, to have regard to: ensuring affordability across the school system as a whole; the national state of teacher and school leader supply; the wider state of the labour market in England; forecast changes in the pupil population and the level of demand for teachers; and the Government’s commitment to increasing autonomy for schools on pay. The remit letter stated that the School TeachersReview Body (STRB) should set out in its report what consideration it had given to targeting and affordability.
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School Teachers’ Review Body: twenty-seventh report, 2017 : presented to Parliament by the Prime Minister and the Secretary of State for Education by Command of Her Majesty, July 2017

School Teachers’ Review Body: twenty-seventh report, 2017 : presented to Parliament by the Prime Minister and the Secretary of State for Education by Command of Her Majesty, July 2017

2.2 The Department’s submission provided context to the remit by outlining the Government’s fiscal strategy. While plans to achieve a fiscal surplus by 2020 had been dropped in November 2016 as a consequence of weaker growth forecasts and uncertainty following the EU referendum, it confirmed that the Government still intended to balance public finances as soon as it could in the next Parliament. Pay restraint in the public sector – delivered through the Government’s policy that pay awards should average 1% a year until 2019-20 – remained an important element of these plans and was expected to save £5 billion in the current Parliament. In her oral representations, the Secretary of State emphasised the importance of control over public sector pay to support the Government’s priority of reducing the deficit. She stated that, if some parts of teachers’ pay ranges were to be uplifted by more than 1%, this would therefore have to be offset by smaller increases elsewhere to keep within the overall 1% pay award. 2.3 The Department confirmed that the Government had accepted the recommendation
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School teachers' review body : twenty-third report - 2014

School teachers' review body : twenty-third report - 2014

2.70 Finally, we have noted that the pace of change in the sector means that school structures have changed significantly in recent years and will continue to evolve. So too will the wider labour market if economic growth leads to increasing opportunities in other sectors and intensifies competition for the most able graduates and leaders. This remit has been conducted against the background of the Government’s policy of public sector pay restraint, and a relatively subdued wider economy. It will be important to keep under review whether pay levels remain appropriate after a sustained period of pay restraint and in the context of wider market movements. We acknowledge that this, and further structural changes in the sector, may point to a need for future development of the framework. But we aim in this report to offer governing bodies an approach which will clarify and extend the flexibility they have now to match leadership reward to local needs and be adaptable to changing demands in future.
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School Teachers' Review Body : twenty-fourth report - 2014

School Teachers' Review Body : twenty-fourth report - 2014

3.58 This remit is the latest of several that have taken place against a backdrop of public sector pay restraint. Our analysis of the teacher labour market has highlighted areas of risk; this is despite the recent relatively benign climate for teacher recruitment and retention given the wider economic landscape. It is our view that these risks will be heightened as the economy strengthens and both graduates and existing teachers see wider employment opportunities. In this context, we would like to receive a future remit enabling a fuller review of the teachers’ pay framework as soon as Government priorities permit. Such a review could examine the overall effectiveness of the framework in providing attractive career paths and pay levels which are competitive with other graduate professions. This would help safeguard the ability of the profession to continue to both recruit good graduates and to retain the excellent teachers who are already developing their careers.
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School teachers’ review body : twenty-first report : 2012

School teachers’ review body : twenty-first report : 2012

3.9 The Department argued in its written evidence that the current pay system did not support schools in recruiting and retaining high quality teachers, and that pay reform was critical to raising educational standards, given the evidence on the importance of high quality teaching. As we noted in Chapter 2 it set out five potential models (with variants) for reform of the pay structure. 3.10 The models incorporated two distinct (though not mutually exclusive) options for addressing local market-facing challenges. The first would involve greater autonomy for individual schools resulting from deregulation of the pay system, providing for flexible pay which was locally adaptable and able to take account of a range of factors impacting on recruitment and retention. These might include the degree of challenge facing a school and shortages of particular subject teachers, as well as conditions in the local labour market. The second option would incorporate a centrally determined structure of local or regional pay where pay levels for geographical areas were prescribed but potentially offering greater differentiation than at present through use of
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School Teachers' Review Body twenty-sixth report, 2016

School Teachers' Review Body twenty-sixth report, 2016

Looking ahead, we underline the need for the Department to help schools make the most effective use of pay flexibilities to recruit and retain the teachers they need, whilst managing tight budgets. It is vitally important that the national pay framework remains attractive to potential recruits and to serving teachers and school leaders. If current recruitment and retention trends continue, a significant uplift to the pay framework is likely to be required. A strengthening graduate labour market will, in any case, demand effective local targeting of pay, to reward performance and respond to local labour market conditions. In our view, pay progression is a crucial tool for schools in rewarding and retaining good teachers. We emphasise the expectation, endorsed by the Secretary of State, that good teachers should progress through the main pay range within about five years and that schools should set their pay policies and manage their budgets accordingly.
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School Teachers’ Review Body : twenty-eighth report : 2018

School Teachers’ Review Body : twenty-eighth report : 2018

2.81 Most consultees told us that they opposed any targeting of uplifts to pay and allowance ranges in 2018/19. The joint union statement contended that targeting in recent years had been unsuccessful and had undermined morale and the value and status of the profession. It proposed that the STRB should recommend “a significant increase in pay for all teachers and school leaders, irrespective of their career stage, setting or geographical location”. The signatories to this joint statement made similar points in their individual submissions. For example, NAHT stated that it opposed the Department’s suggestion of a differentiated pay award in 2018/19, either for teachers in the early stages of their career, or for roles in a particular area or specialism. It considered that this approach would be unlikely to resolve the issues with teacher recruitment or retention, while being detrimental to teacher morale. The NASUWT asserted that “in order to achieve any beneficial impact on recruitment and retention” the STRB must recommend a substantial above inflation pay uplift for all teachers and school leaders. NEOST stated that it strongly believed that the STRB should not seek to differentiate the 2018/19 pay award by targeting different percentage uplifts “within the same pay ranges nor across them.” It claimed that there had been “unintended negative consequences” of last year’s differential uplift.
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School Teachers’ Review Body : twenty-eighth report : 2018

School Teachers’ Review Body : twenty-eighth report : 2018

The School TeachersReview Body (STRB) was established in 1991 as an independent body to examine and report on such matters relating to the statutory conditions of employment of school teachers in England and Wales as may from time to time be referred to it by the Secretary of State for Education. The STRB reports to the Prime Minister and the Secretary of State. The legal foundation for the function and work of the STRB is Part Eight of the Education Act 2002. The secretariat for the STRB is provided by the Office of Manpower Economics (OME).
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School Teachers' Review Body twenty-sixth report, 2016

School Teachers' Review Body twenty-sixth report, 2016

5.19 The joint union statement urged the STRB not to proceed with this proposal. NASUWT and NUT rejected it on the grounds that the statutory position did not permit ‘stepping down’ as the UPR reflects a standard of performance in classroom teaching, rather than a different role with additional responsibilities, the latter being compensated by allowances (e.g. TLRs and SEN payments). Teachers on both pay ranges were accountable for the same range of responsibilities. ATL opposed the proposal, believing it could lead to undue pressure being placed on teachers to step down by school leaders as a way of reducing staffing costs. It also noted that there would be a detrimental impact on pensions for all those teachers on the career average scheme. ATL, NASUWT and UCAC all highlighted the potential for age discrimination. In oral evidence NASUWT and NUT both said the UPR recognised a teacher’s knowledge and experience and that a wider contribution was not a separate role. They said TLRs should be paid for additional responsibilities.
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Teachers working longer review: interim report

Teachers working longer review: interim report

Among the TPS members surveyed by Peters et al. shortly after the introduction of the new flexibilities, only 5% expected to take phased retirement. Moreover, this was the group least likely to describe their retirement plans as certain (2008:150). Headteachers and younger teachers (49-51 years) were less likely to intend to take up this option. However, nearly two-fifths of employees (38%) reported that this was an option they would explore further or give consideration to in the future (2008:151). It is important to note, however, that “many teachers and headteachers seemed to think that phased retirement meant any ‘staged’ process of reducing hours and responsibilities before retirement. Thus these employees were not necessarily thinking of the specific meaning of phased retirement set out in the pension regulations when they said that it is an option they would consider” (Peters et al., 2008:151). Members at all levels were similarly likely to report an intention to consider phased retirement: 35% of headteachers, 39% of deputy or assistant heads, and 39% of teachers (2008:151). Teachers who stated that their main reason for remaining in work is financial obligations, rather than enjoyment of their work, were more ready to consider phased retirement (40% compared to 30% of those who enjoy teaching) (Peters et al., 2008:165).
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A Review of Teachers' Perceptions and Training Regarding School Bullying

A Review of Teachers' Perceptions and Training Regarding School Bullying

Every day an estimated 160,000 students miss school because they fear being bullied (Lund, Blake, Ewing, & Banks, 2012). In some cases, bullying can cause suicide (Barone, 1995) or have negative effects on long-term mental, physical, and social health (Mishna, Scarcello, Pepler, & Wiener, 2005; Pearce, Cross, Monks, Waters, & Falconer, 2011; Ttofi, & Farrington, 2012). Although bullying is a long-standing problem, it has only recently gained significant attention in schools and media (Craig, Bell, & Lescheid, 2011; Kennedy, Russom, & Kevorkian, 2012; Newman, Frey, & Jones, 2010; Strohmeier & Noam, 2012). Although experts generally agree that bullying is a “subset of direct or indirect aggressive behavior(s) characterized by intentional harm doing repetitive aggressive acts, and an imbalance of power” (Strohmeier & Noam, 2012, pg 8), no universal definition of bullying exists across school systems.
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A systematic review of musculoskeletal disorders among school teachers

A systematic review of musculoskeletal disorders among school teachers

Overall, this review suggests that while MSD is most likely an under researched topic among teachers, teaching itself represents a high risk occupation for MSD. The findings of this literature review have been drawn from 33 papers, each of which had measured different musculoskeletal regions using different methods. As most studies had used self-developed questionnaires [3,7,15,21-23,26,28], or the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire [1,18,27], it appears that these are commonly accepted methods for measuring the prevalence of MSD. Other methods used included pilot tested surveys and questionnaires such as the North- wick Neck Pain Questionnaire [6,9], Health Question- naires [25], Job Content questionnaires [5] and the Subjective Health Complaints Questionnaire [14]. While questionnaires are an inexpensive and convenient mode of data collection, they can introduce recall bias and make follow up difficult, especially when anonymous reporting is utilised. More accurate results might be obtained by physical examination and assessment, although these methods are expensive and time consuming, and there- fore, ultimately uncommonly seen in the literature.
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Teachers working longer review: interim report

Teachers working longer review: interim report

Table 4 shows that the largest volume of materials was found for the review theme of employment practices, with 143 materials. This theme was interpreted very broadly (as described below) and could include any aspects relating to working environment, working conditions and working practices. The second largest volume of materials was found for the review theme of career pathways (112). However for both these themes, a relatively small proportion of material was deemed to be strongly relevant and robust (i.e. 5 star). This reflects the fact that a large proportion of the material in these areas consisted of guidance material for practitioners or USA reports on practices in individual states or school districts. There were fewer references found for the theme of retention and attrition (96) but a large proportion of these were felt to be of sufficient quality and relevance to warrant further consideration. Finally there were few references relating to the role of pensions (62) and even fewer on flexible working (16), although again a higher proportion of these materials tended to be considered relevant.
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Teachers working longer review: interim report

Teachers working longer review: interim report

• Some examples of flexible working opportunities/practices were cited, though evidence also reaffirmed that there is often limited scope to undertake alternative pathways or flexible working opportunities, and that this very much depended on circumstances at individual school level.

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Teachers working longer review: interim report

Teachers working longer review: interim report

Research by McNamara, Howson, Gunter and Fryers into the career experiences of black and minority teachers, commissioned by NASUWT and the National College for Leadership of Schools and Children’s Services. This research incorporates a literature review and a survey.

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Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

12 DfE should set the expectation that schools and LAs work together, and in doing so, should clarify the powers of LAs to act as advocates for vulnerable children, working with mainstream, special and AP schools and other partners to support children with additional needs or who are at risk of leaving their school, by exclusion or otherwise. LAs should be enabled to facilitate and convene meaningful local forums that all schools are expected to attend, who meet regularly, share best practice and take responsibility for collecting and reviewing data on pupil needs and moves, and for planning and funding local AP provision, including early intervention for children at risk of exclusion. (Recommendation 2)
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Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

Timpson review of school exclusion: consultation outcome: May 2019

teachers’ views around (un)acceptable behaviour and expectations. One study highlighted that 37% of 1,285 teachers who answered the survey question thought that the disproportionate exclusion of certain minority ethnic groups reflected a ‘clash of cultures’ (Smith et al., 2012). A finding that within the local authorities included, GRT children were 100% successful in overturning exclusions at appeal stage may indicate the widespread nature of practice and presumptions about these children. A strong message repeated across numerous studies was the need to improve teacher recruitment and their training around diversity, discrimination and promoting equality of opportunity, especially as just over half of NQTs responding to DfE’s annual surveys in 2012 and 2017 have consistently felt prepared to teach pupils from different ethnic backgrounds or with SEND since 2012 (Ginnis et al., 2017). In cases in this literature review where teachers did not behave appropriately, a chain reaction could be observed: when the child was stereotyped and viewed negatively, they were reported to have felt under-valued, disrespected and that they did not ‘belong’. For some this could trigger counter-productive behavioural issues. Significant points are made about the specific racism and isolation commonly experienced by GRT children. Moreover, excluding GRT pupils may perversely fuel further exclusions, as one of the catalysts underpinning this group’s exclusion is their relatively low school attendance. The findings around racial abuse and bullying by other pupils and teachers, and that schools do not always address the racism directed at GRT children, indicates another key area for improved training and guidance.
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Twenty years of the euro   Resilience in the face of unexpected challenges  Monetary Dialogue  CEPS Special Report, January 2019

Twenty years of the euro Resilience in the face of unexpected challenges Monetary Dialogue CEPS Special Report, January 2019

For citation purposes, the study should be referenced as: GROS, D., ALCIDI, C., Twenty years of the euro, Study for the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, Policy Department for [r]

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School food: head teachers’ and school senior managers’ perceptions survey, research report

School food: head teachers’ and school senior managers’ perceptions survey, research report

Head teachers and senior managers gave a range of answers about why they did not actively drive take-up of school food; the most commonly cited reason was that school food is not a priority (12 per cent, Figure 50). The other most common reasons suggest practical reasons why schools did not drive take-up of lunches; there is no need to drive take-up (11 per cent), parents/carers or pupils make their own decisions about school lunch (11 per cent) and due to the presence of free school meals (nine per cent).

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