Top PDF Selective Comprehensives: Wales: Access to top performing schools for disadvantaged pupils in Wales

Selective Comprehensives: Wales: Access to top performing schools for disadvantaged pupils in Wales

Selective Comprehensives: Wales: Access to top performing schools for disadvantaged pupils in Wales

We have identified that Welsh medium schools have a large FSM gap when compared to their catchment areas, both those in the top performing category and the wider secondary school population. As local authorities control admissions for these schools, the FSM gap is likely to come about due to the type of parents attracted to these schools, rather than specific actions the schools are taking. We cannot identify conclusively from this data analysis what is causing these differences. However, as pupils who are admitted to top performing schools are most likely to achieve the best outcomes, attend the best universities and succeed in the top professions, it is important to ensure that there are not any barriers in the way that are preventing low income families from attending these schools. The Welsh Government should commission further work with the Regional Consortia and local authorities to investigate access to Welsh medium schools and take steps to address any issues identified. The government has set an ambitious target of one million Welsh speakers by 2050. 12 One of its goals is that disadvantage should
Show more

24 Read more

Selective Comprehensives: Scotland: Access to top performing schools for disadvantaged pupils in Scotland

Selective Comprehensives: Scotland: Access to top performing schools for disadvantaged pupils in Scotland

There is also a tension between fair admissions and setting catchment areas entirely defined by proximity to a school. This favours those who can afford houses near the best schools. A divided state school system, where the top schools are located in affluent areas, serving pupils from advantaged backgrounds, is a disaster for social mobility. This is why we want to see more use of priority for disadvantaged pupils, and ballots - where a proportion of places is allocated randomly, to achieve a genuinely balanced intake. The state school system is the bedrock of education across Great Britain. But there is work still to do to make sure the benefits of comprehensive schooling are available to children regardless of their background.
Show more

18 Read more

Selective Comprehensives: Great Britain: Access to top performing schools for disadvantaged pupils in Scotland, Wales and England

Selective Comprehensives: Great Britain: Access to top performing schools for disadvantaged pupils in Scotland, Wales and England

While the top performing comprehensives in each country are still reflective of their local areas to a degree, they have very different intakes to the average school. These schools offer a pathway to their pupils to attend the best universities and potentially achieve the top labour market outcomes. Each government must look at how their admissions processes could be changed in order to increase access to the best schools for disadvantaged pupils. For example, when deciding catchment areas, governments should work with local councils to draw boundaries which consider the socio-economic diversity of the school intake. Consideration should also be given to the use of random ballots in school admissions, whereby ‘inner’ catchment areas are created for local families and ‘outer’ catchment areas are based on random allocation, which could achieve a balance between proximity and fairness.
Show more

56 Read more

Teaching secondary RE at faith schools in England and Wales: listening to the teachers

Teaching secondary RE at faith schools in England and Wales: listening to the teachers

approach by re-analysing data originally collected by Jackson et al (2010). These data were utilised and analysed to address two kinds of questions. The first kind of question was concerned to identify the levels of importance given to different aims for religious education within faith schools at the secondary level in England and Wales considered as a single category. The second kind of question was concerned to identify the extent to which the levels of importance given to these aims varied according to three groups of factors: the personal characteristics of the teachers (sex, age, and church attendance); the professional background of the teachers (years of teaching experience, qualification in religious education, and participation in continuing professional development); and the foundation of the school (state-maintained Church of England, state-maintained Roman Catholic, traditional
Show more

29 Read more

Permanent and fixed-term exclusions from schools in Wales, 2013/14

Permanent and fixed-term exclusions from schools in Wales, 2013/14

Data are collected from maintained primary, secondary and special schools in the January PLASC following the academic year during which the exclusions took place. For example, exclusions for the 2013/14 academic year were collected in the January 2015 PLASC. If two schools merge before the next January PLASC, the schools’ exclusions data will be submitted by the new school. If a school closes before the next January PLASC, the exclusions data from that school are not provided.

16 Read more

The teaching of mathematics in schools in England and Wales during the early years of the Schools Council 1964 to 1975

The teaching of mathematics in schools in England and Wales during the early years of the Schools Council 1964 to 1975

The following three chapters provide detailed information about three major projects of the time: the Schools Mathematics Project which generated modem mathematics curriculum c[r]

303 Read more

Access to finance for SMEs at a regional level: The case for a development bank for Wales?

Access to finance for SMEs at a regional level: The case for a development bank for Wales?

At a recent event to discuss access to finance for SMEs, there was consensus that it was not the role of the Government to make direct investments in SME financing, but rather to encourage an atmosphere in which SME lending could occur, as well as to increase the effectiveness of schemes to encourage funding (Barty and Miscambell, 2013). Others have noted the need to identify well specified market failures to avoid competition with the private finance sector and, where possible, to work with the private sector to the benefit of both the funding scheme and the wider development of the financial community. Whilst some have argued for the Welsh government to create a publicly owned institution that then competes directly with the banks for SME customers, one could argue that Finance Wales has already evolved into such an entity and is in the Welsh market looking for deals against the high street banks and other providers. As one respondent noted “Offers of funding to clients from our investment fund have been displaced on more than one occasion by competing offers from Finance Wales….we do not feel Finance Wales should be competing with private sector funds – or indeed any other sources of funding. Surely it is not its role to displace other sources of finance. By competing with others it also discourages entrants to these segments of the business finance market”. Interviews undertaken during the review suggest that one of the strengths of publicly owned institutions such as BND and Finnvera is that neither organisation sees itself as competing with the banking system and is instead a complementary partner in supporting SMEs. This would avoid any “crowding out” by any public body and would ensure that the public sector would be working alongside private sector providers of finance. For example, the BND was created to partner with other financial institutions and assist them in meeting the needs of the citizens of North Dakota.
Show more

19 Read more

Literacy and Numeracy in Wales: National Assembly for Wales Research paper

Literacy and Numeracy in Wales: National Assembly for Wales Research paper

The PISA 2009 results were published on 7 December 2010 and are available on the OECD website. All results are broken down by country and public attention tends to focus on one outcome in each domain in particular – the mean value of each country‟s pupils‟ achievements and the ranking of these. The official OECD report lists the UK as a whole although analysis of the results specifically in Wales was produced by NFER, „PISA 2009: Achievements of 15 year olds in Wales‟. Wales‟ performance gave rise to considerable concern both relative to the previous cycle in 2006 and in terms of comparisons with other parts of the UK and the OECD as a whole. Table 1 shows the difference in results between the 2006 and 2009 cycles whilst Tables 2 and 3 compare Wales‟ results with other countries.
Show more

50 Read more

Migrant Workers in Rural Wales and the South Wales Valleys

Migrant Workers in Rural Wales and the South Wales Valleys

Despite occasional problems with local people, there is a clear perception amongst local stakeholders that migrant businesses are making a positive contribution to the socioeconomic redevelopment and regeneration of Merthyr. As one stakeholder described, ‘It’s more multicultural… people are excited to see changes you know in the foods they can taste and the dining experiences they can have.’ Some successful migrant entrepreneurs have featured in local business awards over recent years and are now being drawn into local business and government networks. 16 The migrant entrepreneurs interviewed in Merthyr were nonetheless aware of the problems of integrating different cultural groups, and they work hard to find solutions. However, as the economic crisis has deepened latent tensions between different groups can quickly surface, with interviewees noting how a small dispute between local people and a migrant business can escalate into a bigger issue. Entrepreneurial activity has been more limited in the rural case studies. Different dynamics are evident in different rural places, with a broader customer base amongst the ‗cosmopolitan‘ clientele of the university towns of Bangor and Aberystwyth, whereas Polish shops in Llanybydder and Welshpool remain relatively niche enterprises targeting the migrant community. At the same time, they are highly valued for the commodities they provide and as social spaces. The shop owner in Llanybydder has become a prominent local figure in the absence of other Polish community leaders. The North Wales tourist trade is highly reliant on migrant labour, including outdoor industries (e.g. guided activity holidays) where local knowledge is essential. While some migrants were surprised by such practices, others spoke about developing North Wales in new and innovative ways; viewing the area very differently to local people in regards to land use and amenity value. Similarly to Merthyr, social entrepreneurs are important in this context and good practice included the setting up of a marketing cooperative, where self-employed community project developers could share costs and support each other. Although not all members of the cooperative are migrants, it brings together skills and knowledge to help facilitate local resilience and sustainable ways of working. 5.5 Summary
Show more

81 Read more

Permanent and fixed-term exclusions from schools in Wales, 2014/15

Permanent and fixed-term exclusions from schools in Wales, 2014/15

Pupil numbers used to calculate rates of exclusions within this Statistical First Release include all full-time and part-time pupils in maintained primary, secondary and special schools. They only include pupils from schools that were still open to provide exclusions data in the next January PLASC. In the event that a newly-merged school provided exclusions data, all schools that merged to form that school will also be included in the totals.

15 Read more

The Wales Bill 2016

The Wales Bill 2016

Schedule 7B (Schedule 2 to the Bill) prevents a provision in an Assembly Act from modifying the law on reserved matters. The law on reserved matters is defined in paragraph 1(2) as any UK Parliament enactment or rule of common law, the subject matters of which is a reserved matter in new Schedule 7A. Paragraph 2 sets out an exception to this, so that the Assembly can modify the law on reserved matters if the modification is ancillary to a provision with a devolved purpose and has no greater effect on reserved matters than is necessary to give effect to the purpose of that provision. Clause 4 defines a “Wales public authority” and inserts a new Schedule 9A into the Government of Wales Act 2006. Wales public authorities’ functions are exercisable only in relation to Wales and are wholly or mainly functions that do not relate to reserved matters. The Schedule includes a list of Wales public authorities to provide clarity as to the public authorities which are devolved, and includes a power to amend the list in future by an Order in Council approved by the Assembly and both Houses of Parliament.
Show more

18 Read more

Rousseau and romanticism in Wales.

Rousseau and romanticism in Wales.

ownership and reading habits in France during the Revolutionary period has suggested that persecuted émigrés and committed revolutionaries alike read many of the same books. 1 Nevertheless, it is remarkable how polarized the uses are to which Rousseau is put, both at home and abroad. In Wales in particular he has two very different reception histories. This chapter is about two groups of readers in Wales with different politics and different means of access to Rousseau. I discuss first the privileged group who could read Rousseau in the original French, before focusing on those whose radical politics led them to Rousseau in English translation. I shall also trace the reception of Rousseau in the Romantic period through texts in Welsh, since most people in Wales at the time could read neither French nor English: literacy rates in Welsh were high, but nine out of every ten inhabitants were
Show more

17 Read more

Childhood poverty in Wales and its implications for schools: a survey of trainee teachers’ perceptions

Childhood poverty in Wales and its implications for schools: a survey of trainee teachers’ perceptions

Table 4 reveals respondents’ knowledge and understanding, and possible confidence, of some of the approaches and dispositions they, as trainee teachers, can use to try and combat the effects of poverty on pupils in primary school. The vast majority felt that they had a clear awareness of how to plan and deliver exciting and engaging lessons (98%). While the overwhelming majority (95%) felt that they knew how to provide regular feedback to pupils on how they can improve their academic performance (98%) only 55% felt confidence in tailoring the curriculum to the needs of disadvantaged learners. While over four fifths (81%) noted they knew how to promote wellbeing and pastoral care for their learners only forty percent stated they felt confident in their own ability to promote growth mind-set culture in their classrooms and develop resilient learners. Furthermore, while over half the respondents (54%) stated that they knew how to make effective use of the PDG only 42% knew how to make effective use of the results of the Flying Start initiative when tailoring the curriculum to the needs of disadvantaged learners. Flying Start is an Early Years programme for families with children under 4 years of age in some of the most disadvantaged areas of Wales providing: free quality, part- time childcare for 2-3 years old; an enhanced health visiting service; access to parenting programmes; ongoing access to an appropriate language and play group (Morris & Willis, 2014).
Show more

13 Read more

Export finance in Wales

Export finance in Wales

The Export Finance Survey showed that financing to assist SME exporting and foreign exchange risk were identified as barriers for around 30% of SME exporters participating in the Survey. While there are export finance products available which work to support Welsh exports both the Export Finance Survey, and the review material in this report, suggests that there is a need for more targeted export finance product provision to Wales’ smaller firms. Of equal concern was that the Survey also revealed a low level of awareness of the export finance products that are available, and a paucity in the utilisation of products.
Show more

34 Read more

The changing social definition of youth in schools: England and Wales and the USA 1945-1990.

The changing social definition of youth in schools: England and Wales and the USA 1945-1990.

majority of adolescents and their parents the value of work was still.. retained in a class cultural pattern." Consequently there was another ambivalence in American thinking about [r]

355 Read more

Impact of private funding on access to elective hospital treatment in the regions of England and Wales

Impact of private funding on access to elective hospital treatment in the regions of England and Wales

For NHS hospitals, extracts of the latest available data (1996-1997) were obtained from the Department of Health and Welsh Information Agency's Hospital Episodes Statistics for elective [r]

5 Read more

The Financial Education and Inclusion (Wales) Bill: National Assembly for Wales bill summary

The Financial Education and Inclusion (Wales) Bill: National Assembly for Wales bill summary

The EM recognises that local authorities cannot deliver on the financial inclusion agenda on their own, however the Bill emphasises the central role that local authorities have in coordinating and delivering various local services in their area. Section 9(1)(b) states that this should include helping citizens to understand the implications and effects of street-trading and cold calling, to ensure for instance that authorities take steps to help citizens from being targeted by scams, payday loan companies and illegal lenders. The EM says that it was originally intended for the Bill to legislate with the aim of prohibiting the practice of cold calling within certain areas in Wales. As this could fall outside the National Assembly‟s
Show more

20 Read more

Information Guide: Wales and Europe A selection of websites to find information on Wales and Europe

Information Guide: Wales and Europe A selection of websites to find information on Wales and Europe

National Assembly for Wales • Committees [there was no dedicated European Committee in the 4 th term of the NAW and in the current 5th term – European issues are dealt with by other Comm[r]

18 Read more

Wales and the European Union

Wales and the European Union

Considered among the most important factors influencing the regional competitiveness and development potential of Wales are: I I I the quality of its basic infrastructure availability of[r]

42 Read more

Factors influencing active travel to primary and secondary schools in Wales

Factors influencing active travel to primary and secondary schools in Wales

A key strength of this paper is that it offers previously unexplored evidence to better understand active travel to primary and secondary schools in Wales and thus may inform future policies to encourage active travel to schools. Other strong aspects of this study include its sample size along with the careful survey design and weighting of very recent (2013/14 and 2014/15) observations to represent individuals living in Wales. A potential limitation of this study is that the survey responses regarding children and youth travel to school came from the guardians'/parents' perspectives whereas Panter, Jones, and van Sluijs (2008) asserted that youth perceptions also determine active travel to school. Findings of this study suggest that parent perceptions influence children and adolescent active commuting to school, but it might be useful for future studies to collect data from adolescents' perspectives and compare findings. Also, given that the NSW data come from parent/guardian reports may also pose a challenge for like-for-like comparisons with survey data coming directly from children or adolescents. Finally, the analysis was based on a strict classification of bus and walk school trips as non-active trips, though it should be recognised that such trips involve some level of moderate physical activity through walking to and from bus stops to home and school.
Show more

24 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...