Top PDF Simulation Enhanced Interprofessional Education in Health Care

Simulation Enhanced Interprofessional Education in Health Care

Simulation Enhanced Interprofessional Education in Health Care

The simulation-enhanced IPE provides a realistic educational approach and standardized experience that can promote teamwork. This approach allows to learn from mistakes, and to avoid patient harm. The findings of the review revealed the benefits of IPE included the development of IP knowledge and skills, and changes in atti- tudes. Students find IPE most valuable when it involves opportunities for face-to-face small-group discussion with peers from other professional schools. Therefore, IPE has been a growing part of the curricula in colleges of medicine and nursing for decades (Howkins & Bray, 2008). Several students noted that they were more com- fortable with another profession after the IPE activities. Sharing patient data helps them develop decision mak- ing, and problem solving with decreased stress. In addition, students are more prepared for collaborative practice before they enter healthcare settings there is the potential for enhanced patient safety and satisfaction, improved patient outcomes. Nursing and medical students reported feeling more prepared for future non-technical skills such as IP roles and communication skills to improve patient safety during simulation experiences (Couto et al., 2015; Ellis et al., 2008; Vyas et al., 2012). In the study, significant positive improvements were seen in nursing students’ responses (of these, 11% were pharmacy students, 46% were medical students and 26% were nursing students) on the post-course survey of knowledge, skills, attitudes and job satisfaction. Over 90% of students reported that simulation increased their understanding of IP roles and the importance of communication (Paul et al., 2014). In a different study, based on the student’s feedback it was recommended that revisions be made to include more information regarding their IP roles. Other research reported that simulated IPE enhanced IP communication, self-confidence and cultural awareness in nursing and medical students (Baker et al., 2008). Despite positive reports with many enjoying teamwork-learning activities, integration of IPE into the clinical education remains limited. Accordingly, simulated teamwork presents still many barriers that can impact IPE (Jeffries, 2005; Palagnas, 2012; IPECEP, 2011).
Show more

8 Read more

Students´ perception of interprofessional education in the bachelor programme “Interprofessional Health Care” in Heidelberg, Germany: an exploratory case study

Students´ perception of interprofessional education in the bachelor programme “Interprofessional Health Care” in Heidelberg, Germany: an exploratory case study

Benefiting from each other ’ s perspective and getting to know the different professional practice, are mentioned as advantages that occurred. Apparently students slowly ex- perience a change from staying in their own professional group, due to feeling safer, to showing interest in other perspectives and being curious about each other ’ s profes- sion. The benefits regarding a better practical collabor- ation seem to be due to a better understanding and awareness of challenges that the other health professions face [25]. Through this awareness students can be more empathic with other professions and seem to lose the fear of interacting and working together as a team. Analysing the students ’ statements it became clear that learning from and about each other were predominantly seen as benefits of the interprofessional education whereas learning with each other still provided some challenges concerning the heterogeneity of the group. This is possibly due to social identity of the students at this early stage of their voca- tional training where their main social group of interest is the professional group [26].
Show more

8 Read more

Interprofessional Collaboration in Ontario’s Family Health Teams:  A Review of the Literature

Interprofessional Collaboration in Ontario’s Family Health Teams: A Review of the Literature

The primary care setting serves as a critical entry point to the healthcare system [1]. It acts as a gateway for acute treatments and an essential site for the management of chronic conditions, as well as preventive care, health promotion, and population health initiatives [2]. Across the globe there has been considerable reform, with an increased emphasis on delivering care using a team-based approach [3]. Interprofessional primary care teams include physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and health educators among many other health professionals working side by side in clinical practice [4]. “Collaborative practice is an inter-professional process for com- munication and decision making that enables the separate and shared knowledge and skills of care providers to synergistically influence the client/patient care pro- vided” [5]. Interprofessional teams improve healthcare access, resource utilization, efficiency of services, outcomes, and costs [6,7]. Patients cared for in interprofes- sional settings express more satisfaction, as well as enhanced health knowledge, skills, and self-care strategies [6]. In primary care settings, a team approach has been shown to be successful in the prevention and management of mental health condi- tions and chronic diseases, and has contributed to improvements in health status and quality of life [6].
Show more

19 Read more

Implementation of an interprofessional team-based learning program involving seven undergraduate health and social care programs from two universities, and students’ evaluation of their readiness for interprofessional learning

Implementation of an interprofessional team-based learning program involving seven undergraduate health and social care programs from two universities, and students’ evaluation of their readiness for interprofessional learning

graduate medical education setting [9]. Ohtsuki and Matsui [10] gave a brief report on using TBL for IPE, but a full evaluation of an approach bringing together TBL and IPE with details on implementation, resources, and content materials has not been previously reported. Similarly, the work of Nelson et al. [11] provides a review of 17 studies conducted on interprofessional team training focusing on students at prelicensure level. However, owing to the great variety of methodologies (e.g., different teaching methods and assessment measures), they found little evidence to demonstrate the best way to implement team training. Their review mentioned that many studies focused on just one profession or on teams with limited disciplinary diver- sity (consisting mainly of medical and nursing students), which may not realistically reflect the diverse disciplinary composition of professional health-care teams.
Show more

12 Read more

Palliative care simulation: Nurturing interprofessional collegiality

Palliative care simulation: Nurturing interprofessional collegiality

The use of simulation is becoming a widely utilised teaching and learning strategy in many health professions. However, there is limited research on interprofessional simulation, with the most common being found among nursing and medical professions (Baker et al., 2008; Dillon et al., 2009; Maxson et al., 2011; Reese, Jeffries, & Engum 2010; Reising, Carr, Shea, & King, 2011), and nursing and paramedics (van Soeren et al., 2011; van Soeren, Devlin-Cop, MacMillan, & Reeves, 2012). Only a few others have reported on projects involving other health professions. They include pharmacy (Barnett, Hollister, & Hall, 2011; Ruth-Sahd, Schneider, & Strouse, 2011), dietician (Hall, Marshall, Weaver, Boyle, & Taniguchi, 2011; Prentice, Taplay, Horsley, Payeur-Grenier, & Belford, 2011; van Soeren et al., 2011) social work (Hall et al., 2011; Prentice, et al., 2011), occupational therapy (Hall et al., 2011; Ruth-Sahd et al., 2011), audiology (Barnett et al., 2011), and physiotherapy (Hall et al., 2011). Literature Review
Show more

10 Read more

Complexity Theory and Interprofessional Education in Health

Complexity Theory and Interprofessional Education in Health

An explanation for why self-organization and emergence were not detected in my data relates to both the duration of the experience being studied and the duration of data collection. Authors of qualitative studies have identified instances of self-organization and/or emergence in the past using similar methods as me. However, in past instances, either the data collection or the experience of the participants (or both) occurred over a longer duration than in my research. For example, in a post hoc analysis of qualitative data obtained from teacher development cases, Fazio and Gallagher (2009) were able to identify emergent and self-organization qualities in their data. However, their two cases occurred over the course of 1 year and 2 years respectively, and the data collection followed a similar longitudinal trajectory. Related specifically to interprofessional education, Weaver et al. (2011) identified self-organization and emergence within data collected using focus groups with interprofessional educator course developers. Again, similar to Fazio and Gallagher, the participants were involved in an activity over the course of 9 months. Finally, in a multiple case study of four nursing homes, Colon- Emeric et al. (2006) collected field data by way of observations and interviews over the course of 6 weeks. They determined the degree of self-organization within a nursing home either impeded or facilitated care planning for residents. In all of these cases the length of the experience being studied and/or the data collection occurred over months and years as opposed to hours. In my research, both the experience and data collection occurred over 3 hours. Therefore, it is possible self-organization and emergence were not observed in my data due to the relatively short experience and data collection periods.
Show more

305 Read more

Clinical confidence following an interprofessional educational program on eating disorders for health care professionals: a qualitative analysis

Clinical confidence following an interprofessional educational program on eating disorders for health care professionals: a qualitative analysis

The first 207 program participants (187 women and 20 men) were invited to respond, and all of them completed this part of the evaluation procedure. The mean age was 45.4 years (range 24–60). Forty-six participants were working in primary health care and 129 were working in the secondary health care sector. The remaining 32 health care workers did not provide detailed information about their current workplace. Occupationally, 97 were nurses, 31 were medical doctors, 30 were psychologists, 42 had other kinds of occupations in the health care system, six participants did not work within health care, and one failed to state his or her occupation. The participants reported working clinically with a mean of five eating disorder patients during the past 12 months before this investigation.
Show more

5 Read more

An evaluation of interprofessional education for health and social care professionals : the teachers' views

An evaluation of interprofessional education for health and social care professionals : the teachers' views

Tope, R 1998 The impact of interprofessional education in the South West Region: a critical analysis: the literature review London Department of Health Tope, R 1999 The impact of interpr[r]

312 Read more

Overcoming barriers to interprofessional education in gerontology: the Interprofessional Curriculum for the Care of Older Adults

Overcoming barriers to interprofessional education in gerontology: the Interprofessional Curriculum for the Care of Older Adults

As noted in Table 1, IPE is challenging because of the large number of people involved and the interconnecting of various cultures. The leadership of each discipline appointed a faculty representative to be part of a planning retreat that was held shortly after the grant was awarded. Faculty members and community practitioners from each discipline contributed to all components of the curriculum to ensure relevance for all learners. There were intentional and deliberate efforts to include faculty whose professional training emphasized the biological, psychological, and social determinants of health. Additionally, all faculty had a strong interdisciplinary focus; all had experience in interdisciplinary research, clinics, or community-driven projects, often with one other; and a few held multiple professional degrees (e.g., nursing and social work, medical doctor and public health). The diversity of disciplines, experience, and trust among the faculty members allowed for a balance of perspectives to be realized in the curriculum design, preventing the tendency for the medical aspects of the curriculum to overshadow other health aspects. Adding the perspective of practitioners from the local AAA provided a balance between an academic curriculum and one that reflects community reality for the older adults.
Show more

10 Read more

Understanding attitude of health care professional teachers toward interprofessional health care collaboration and education in a Southeast Asian country

Understanding attitude of health care professional teachers toward interprofessional health care collaboration and education in a Southeast Asian country

was invited to participate. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with 3 senior lecturers of medical programs because they could not take part in the FGDs, and their perceptions were considered valuable. Lecturers majoring in medical education (Dian Apriliana Rachmawati [DAR]) and community medicine (Suryani Yulianti [SY]), who understood the concept and aims of this study, took part as facilitators of the FGDs. A discussion guide was used to facilitate each group discussion. The guide consisted of questions exploring health care professional teachers’ perceptions regarding the following: 1) interprofessional health care collaboration and education, 2) problems of health care collaboration, and 3) the way in which IPE would contribute to remedying the problems. All FGDs and interviews were video-recorded.
Show more

15 Read more

Examining Professional Stereotypes in an Interprofessional Education Simulation Experience

Examining Professional Stereotypes in an Interprofessional Education Simulation Experience

Overall, student impressions were positive with an average mean above 4 on a 1 to 5 Likert scale. The statement that rated highest was question four, “I feel more comfort- able communicating with healthcare team members (nursing, RTs, and SLPs).” This result supports the ability of IPE to socialize students, thereby improving communi- cation among future caregivers. The statement that rated lowest was question five, “The debriefing and group discussions were valuable.” Future studies may serve to be better informed by asking participants more specifically, “How can debriefing sessions be more valuable?” From the perspective of faculty in debriefing sessions, students were engaged and actively participated in group discussions. One possible explana- tion is that there may have been confusion related to the term debrief in question five. In the open-ended question, “What would you like to see changed about this activity?” some students referred to the time before the simulation as the “brief,” and com- mented that they would have liked to have had more preparation before the simula- tion, or more time to meet with their team before entering the patient’s room.
Show more

20 Read more

Implementation of a Mental Health Guideline in a Long-Term Care Home: A Participatory Action Approach

Implementation of a Mental Health Guideline in a Long-Term Care Home: A Participatory Action Approach

Unit staff were keen to participate and responded positively when asked to com- plete the pre- and post-evaluations. Participation was enhanced with a range of recruitment strategies, primarily scheduling flexibility. However, we did encounter challenges in engaging staff across shifts in the implementation of the behavioural strategies. Huddles were scheduled on specific day and evening shifts. No huddles were conducted on night shift. As a result, some staff never had the opportunity to participate in the huddles. One huddle topic was “better communication across shifts,” attempting to directly address this difficulty. Moreover, weekly team rounds were held during the day and therefore staff on other shifts could not participate in these and were not provided with the same opportunities to learn about behav- ioural management. The interprofessional team members work across different programs and often had scheduling conflicts that limited their ability to attend huddles. Some staff indicated that this project seemed to be more “focused on day- shift nursing.”
Show more

18 Read more

Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey

Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey

Integration of simulation into curricular activities was highly variable, not only amongst institutions but also within learner groups at each institution. The integration of simula- tion into undergraduate (nursing and/or medical schools) and postgraduate education is higher in the first 2 years of the programs, decreasing over the last 2 years. This pattern of reduced integration during the clinical years of undergraduate training is particularly worrisome, as it suggests that educa- tors are not fully integrating simulation as learners progress through training. The same could be said for postgraduate learners, where opportunities for immersive clinical experi- ences of increasing difficulty and complexity are critically important as trainees advance.
Show more

11 Read more

Interprofessional simulation in a student community clinic: insights from an educational framework and contact theory

Interprofessional simulation in a student community clinic: insights from an educational framework and contact theory

There is limited literature on interprofessional simula- tion in community or social care. The majority of the re- search on interprofessional simulation focuses on the clinical roles of healthcare professionals, and the phys- ical health of the patient/client only [7, 8, 10, 20]. There are limited structured opportunities for students to interact with a variety of different professions to collab- orate on care planning despite placement in multidiscip- linary teams in community settings. Clinical placements afford such learning opportunities but simulation offers deliberate practice of collaborative competencies in a safer space. In the SCIPE program, students had the op- portunity to learn about the community health setting and services offered to clients, as well as to learn with, from and about another profession.
Show more

12 Read more

Simulated interprofessional learning activities for rural health care services: perceptions of health care students

Simulated interprofessional learning activities for rural health care services: perceptions of health care students

Each session was consistent in that both students and faculty were interprofessional for each session. For every simulation scenario in each session, students from different disciplines gathered together to represent their relevant field, thus forming a multidisciplinary group. Simulation sessions included the use of high-fidelity simulation mannequins and standardized patients. Sessions involved scenarios of various rural health concerns including chronic disease management, primary care, and emergency medicine. The IPL case scenar- ios follow a patient through the different stages of diagnosis treatment and long-term rehabilitation. An interprofessional team of students determined and responded to management for the given scenario. The scenarios were related to how the health care system functions in rural and remote locations. The scenarios integrated skills in patient observation, clini- cal reasoning, problem-solving, leadership, collaboration, communication, delegation, medical practice, and referrals. Each scenario ran for ~ 30 minutes.
Show more

7 Read more

Interprofessional Education and Practice Guide:Designing ethics orientated interprofessional education for health and social care students

Interprofessional Education and Practice Guide:Designing ethics orientated interprofessional education for health and social care students

Health and social care has radically altered since the introduction of the National Health Service in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1948 and the associated services that now exist to address individuals’ social needs alongside their health needs. Practitioners now serve individuals, families, and communities 1 with complex needs, rights and entitlements that are far beyond the capacity of any one profession to respond adequately (Barr, 2014). Delivering care therefore now stems from decision-making within multidisciplinary teams. However, high-profile reports of inquiries into cases of professional error, neglect and abuse have exposed lapses in communication and collaboration between the multidisciplinary teams (Barr, 2014). The inquiries bring into stark relief the consequences of professional groups socialised into behaviour patterns and working relationships that maintain a pervasive order based on a medical hegemony (Humphris & Hean, 2004). Hence, for educators, there has been a call to bring students from differing professions together to learn (Humphris & Hean, 2004) to enable more effective teamwork, interprofessional communication, and collaborative practice in a manner that has been referred to as “learning together to work together” (World Health Organisation, 1988) to ensure the safe and effective treatment of patients (Williams, Onsman & Brown, 2010).
Show more

37 Read more

Awareness regarding Inter Professional Education among final year medical, dental and nursing students

Awareness regarding Inter Professional Education among final year medical, dental and nursing students

Interprofessional education (IPE) is defined as a teaching and learning process between two or more professions that encourages cooperative work and expands quality of care (Keeler, Brennan et al. 2018). The Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaboration adds that IPE occurs when health care professionals learn collaboratively within and across different professions to acquire knowledge, skills and values for working in teams (Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (CIHC), 2014). when students from two or more professions learn from and with each other achieve an effective level of collaboration and cooperation in health care practice (Reeves, Fletcher et al. 2016).
Show more

20 Read more

How Medical Students Conceptualize Disability: Implications for Interprofessional Practice and Education

How Medical Students Conceptualize Disability: Implications for Interprofessional Practice and Education

While achieving improved interdisciplinary collaboration among veteran health- care professionals may be more challenging given the degree to which one may be “locked” to a given discipline and its tenets, students and junior professionals can be directly targeted and educated in collaborative practice. Fundamental to such edu- cation is the adoption of universal terms and constructs. For example, similar to how anatomic structures, planes, and directions evoke collective understanding among nearly all healthcare professionals, the ICF provides a systematic framework to conceptualize health and disability, and a standard language for its description. It is important to note, however, that universal adoption of the ICF does not preclude the potential for discipline-specific specialization and innovation; instead, a com- mon language and framework will facilitate the translation and transfer of knowl- edge that might otherwise be ‘”buried” by esoteric layers of discipline specialization. Therefore, we believe that healthcare professionals should, at minimum, be intro- duced to the ICF’s conceptual framework and language. Even a basic introduction to the model and its fundamental principles may help to bridge gaps that could lead to inefficient interdisciplinary care teams. Like many before us, we support the view that the ICF conceptualizes health and disability from a perspective that is congru- ent with contemporary health-related needs and expectations across health disci- plines [1,3,4,30,33].
Show more

20 Read more

Simulation enhanced nurse mentoring to improve preeclampsia and eclampsia care: an education intervention study in Bihar, India

Simulation enhanced nurse mentoring to improve preeclampsia and eclampsia care: an education intervention study in Bihar, India

To reduce maternal mortality in Bihar, it is essential that primary health providers are able to effectively diagnose and manage PE/E. We found that mentees had improved composite scores in ‘history taking’ and ‘management steps;’ however, only one individual EBP significantly improved from first to last participation in simulated PE/E cases. The reason for this is likely multifactorial, encompassing need for additional training and resource limitations. For example, the low rates of urine protein assessment and oxygen administration in simulated cases may be partially attributed to actual supply short- ages [28–30]. While the total number of ‘management steps’ completed by mentees increased, it is notable that magnesium sulfate administration did not improve. This finding is in contrast to previous evaluations of PE/E simu- lation training in high-resource settings [31, 32]. Nonethe- less, the 76% rate of magnesium sulfate administration in simulated cases is much higher than that seen in the CLIP study, which found intravenous magnesium sulfate was never administered by nurses in PHCs [8]. This suggests that the initial simulation scenario may have overestimated mentees ’ baseline skills, particularly as they had likely already gained basic knowledge and skills through preced- ing lectures and skills stations. The inability of the simula- tion data to fully capture mentees improved skills was further supported by mentors’ discussion of the impact of simulation learning on their mentees’ clinical confidence and skills. For example, while mentors acknowledged that some mentees still called their mentors with questions regarding magnesium sulfate dosing and clarifying whether severe features were present or not, mentors shared many stories of mentees independently administering magne- sium sulfate to mothers with preeclampsia with severe fea- tures. All but one mentor agreed that this would not have happened before training. These findings suggest that PE/E simulations may have an important role to play in improv- ing diagnosis and management. Further studies should explore how PE/E simulation training may translate into changes in clinical practice among providers.
Show more

9 Read more

Student interprofessional mental health simulation (SIMHS): evaluating the impact on medical and nursing students, and clinical psychology trainees

Student interprofessional mental health simulation (SIMHS): evaluating the impact on medical and nursing students, and clinical psychology trainees

It is acknowledged that employing a paired samples design for pre- and post-course measures do not allow for comparisons to be drawn between mental health simulation training and other educational modalities. While this study demonstrates the potential benefits of such training, further research comparing simulation to other educational interventions would be beneficial. The sample size of each professional group was limited and sampling methods could have been improved. Consequently the benefits to each individual profession were not examined, and future research to investigate the possibility of differences would be advisable, both through quantitative measures of learning outcomes and in depth qualitative analyses such as semi-structured interviews. Validated measures were not employed in this study, not least due to the fact that such measures for attitudes,
Show more

25 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...

Related subjects