Top PDF SOCIAL CARE, ENGLAND CHILDREN AND YOUNG PERSONS, ENGLAND

SOCIAL CARE, ENGLAND CHILDREN AND YOUNG PERSONS, ENGLAND

SOCIAL CARE, ENGLAND CHILDREN AND YOUNG PERSONS, ENGLAND

Regulations 7 to 10 make provision about the fitness of the persons carrying on and managing the home, and require satisfactory information to be available in relation to certain specified matters. Where an organisation carries on the home, it must nominate a responsible individual in respect of whom this information must be available (regulation 7). Regulation 8 prescribes the circumstances where a manager must be appointed for the home, and regulation 10 imposes general requirements in relation to the proper conduct of the home, and the need for appropriate training.

54 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

11 to 19 year olds girls with a mental disorder were more likely to feel that they compared themselves to others on social media. Young people with a disorder (both girls and boys) were more likely to feel that the number of ‘likes’ they got affected their mood than those without a disorder.

35 Read more

Status quo and inequalities of the statutory provision for young children in England, 40 Years on from Warnock

Status quo and inequalities of the statutory provision for young children in England, 40 Years on from Warnock

We argue that the fragmented structure of the EHC plan, which separates the three domains, contributes to this presentation; it is impossible in real life to separate education, health and social care domains, as they are constantly interacting to define the individual’s functioning (World Health Organization, 2001; Rakap, 2015). Over the last 20 years, the WHO has endorsed a definition of “health status” that moves beyond the mere existence of medical issues, to include a “State of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity” (. . .) “health-related state is the level of functioning within a health-related domain (. . .). Health related domains are those areas of functioning that, while they have a strong relationship to a health condition, are not likely to be the primary responsibility of the health system, but rather of other systems contributing to wellbeing’ (World Health Organization, 2001, p. 228). From this point of view, education needs are also health needs. Together, they are functioning needs and should not be split. This argument is the essence of the transactional approaches to development, which posit that at each moment in time the child is the result of this dynamic, unbreakable interaction; these approaches have been conceived as the core developmental framework for early childhood intervention (Sameroff, 2009), according to which all needs are health needs as long as they have implications on functioning and well-being. This new approach to health that has been widely endorsed over the last 20 years following WHO recommendations is aligned with the new SEND policy in England where participation is regarded as the ultimate outcome of provision, however, in practice, the plans still contemplate three separate sections for the different types of needs, and as illustrated in the current study, health needs are still seen from a medicalized point of view. Perhaps the EHC plans should contain one single narrative, where the whole child is described in detail, with consideration for the interaction between health, education and social care domains.
Show more

12 Read more

Child Protection and Safeguarding in England: Changing and Competing Conceptions of Risk and their Implications for Social Work

Child Protection and Safeguarding in England: Changing and Competing Conceptions of Risk and their Implications for Social Work

It seems likely therefore that professional social work is going to be given a central role and range of responsibilities in these emerging new arrangements. Of, course this is far from new and, at one level, can be seen to simply confirm what was clearly stated in Every Child Matters: Change for Children in Social Care (DfES, 2004c) quoted earlier. However, in a context of much reduced resources, the high likelihood of increased unemployment and greater social and economic inequalities, the pressures and demands upon social workers are lilely to increase considerabley. Whether, and for how long, the new found trust in social workers will continue will be interesting to see, particularly in the context of the high profile media child death story which will inevitably emerge at some point. These are challenging times. What we are seeing, however, is the
Show more

42 Read more

How does the health and wellbeing of children and young people in London compare with four major cities in
England?

How does the health and wellbeing of children and young people in London compare with four major cities in England?

The health and wellbeing of children and young people in London has improved in many ways over the past two decades. However there are areas that have improved little for London’s children, such as child poverty and health inequalities. Comparisons have been uniformly made between London and the England average, which may not always be the most suitable comparison for the capital. 3 Population demographics in London are markedly different to that of many parts of England and large urban areas are likely to have a range of health disadvantages (e.g. crowding, pollution) and potential health advantages (eg better access to health services) than rural areas. It is therefore useful to compare London with other major urban centres in England, which are likely to share issues related to urbanicity, demographics and health care. Such a comparison would show where other cities are doing better than London in order to identify opportunities for improving the health of children and young people in London.
Show more

18 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

developing a sense of their own identity, their social networks, and their place in wider society (Sawyer et al., 2018). 11 to 19 year olds in England are a diverse group in terms of their evolving identities, behaviours, responsibilities and experiences. The wider social context of adolescence is changing. Since the previous survey, carried out in 2004, social media and smart technology have expanded. By 2017, 12 to 15 year olds were averaging 21 hours a week online (Ofcom, 2017). The 2017 survey focusses on one aspect of being online; how much time is spent on social media (websites and applications that facilitate the creation and sharing of content or participation in social networks). While both the 2004 and 2017 surveys asked about bullying, the latest survey also covered its newer form in cyberbullying; defined as ‘the use of electronic communication to bully a person, typically by sending messages of an intimidating or threatening nature’ (Stevenson, 2010).
Show more

48 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

charities, academics, educators, the public and the media. Uses of the data include: informing and monitoring policy; monitoring the prevalence of health or illness and changes in health or health related behaviours in children and young people; informing the planning of services for this age group; and writing media articles. Universities, charities and the commercial sector use the data for health and social research. User needs have been gathered and considered at all points in the collection and publication of this information. This has been guided by a steering group consisting of representatives from NHS Digital, DHSC, PHE, DfE, NHS England, Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, academic leads in Child and Adolescent Mental Health, and academic leads in Contemporary Psychoanalysis and
Show more

12 Read more

Challenges to Children’s Rights Today: What do Children Think?

Challenges to Children’s Rights Today: What do Children Think?

The evidence on children’s mistrust of authority points to the need for much work to be done in this area. Children in conflict with the law who may be lacking family and peer support require key personspeople (e.g.for example, in a social worker) to develop relationships of trust and support to enable them to get their lives back on track. One young person in the UK who was previously in care and in conflict with the law, but who is now raising his own young family states: “Before meeting Pete [a youth worker] I wasn’t doing anything and had been thrown out of my care home. He helped me get into college and start my training as a chef. He helped buy my books and my chefs whites. Now I can focus on looking after my family, keeping a good job and going from there.” 160
Show more

58 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

These terms are both used to indicate a number of disorders characterised by severe impairment in social interaction, communication, and the presence of stereotyped behaviours, interests, and activities. ‘Pervasive developmental disorder’ (PDD) is used in the ICD classificatory system, but was replaced in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) with ASD, the term used most in this report. The category as used here consists mostly of ICD-10 classifications of autism and Asperger’s syndrome, but also some cases of other pervasive developmental disorders. Symptoms include: language problems, difficulty relating to other people, unusual forms of play, difficulty with changes in routine, and repetitive movements or behaviour patterns.
Show more

45 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

sampling frame. The use of the NHS Patient Register meant children in care were also included in the sample frame in the 2017 survey, something that was not possible with the CBR. Looked after children typically have higher rates of mental disorders when compared to non-looked after children (House of Commons Education Committee, 2016), emphasising the importance of their inclusion in the sample. However, the number of looked after children sampled to take part in the 2017 survey was likely to be small (at 31 March 2017 there were 72,670 looked after children in England, representing 0.6% of the 0 to 19 year old population) (DfE, 2017), meaning:
Show more

64 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The survey benefited from an expert steering group, we would like to thank Miranda Wolpert, Peter Fonagy, Catherine Newsome, Lucy Heyes, Helen Duncan, Jessica Sharp, David Lockwood, Jeremy Clark, Alexandra Lazaro, and Nilum Patel. NHS Digital commissioned the survey series with funding from the Department of Health and Social Care. We are particularly grateful to Dan Collinson, Alison Neave, Steven Webster, Jane Town, Ben Osborne and Kate Croft for their thoughtful

33 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The survey benefited from an expert steering group, we would like to thank Miranda Wolpert, Peter Fonagy, Catherine Newsome, Lucy Heyes, Helen Duncan, Jessica Sharp, David Lockwood, Jeremy Clark, Alexandra Lazaro, and Nilum Patel. NHS Digital commissioned the survey series with funding from the Department of Health and Social Care. We are particularly grateful to Dan Collinson, Alison Neave, Steven Webster, Jane Town, Ben Osborne and Kate Croft for their thoughtful

27 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

White British children were about three times more likely to be identified with ASD than Black or Asian children. Research on variation by ethnic group is mixed, and migration status may compound the relationship (Becerra et al., 2014). The higher rate of diagnosis in White British children has been thought to relate to greater treatment and service access. England’s survey of mental health in adults found White British people with a common mental disorder to have higher levels of treatment access than people of other ethnic groups (Lubian et al., 2016). Recent research has also found that members of minority ethnic groups may hold more self-stigmatising views of autism (Papadopulous, 2016). This could be a factor shaping higher levels of social desirability bias in reporting of symptoms in children with minority ethnic parents. Almost all the children in the sample identified on the spectrum were recognised as having special educational needs, and they make up a sizeable minority of the special educational needs group as a whole (one in seven). The survey data indicates the extent to which schools and education services may have autistic pupils in their communities.
Show more

37 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

The survey benefited from an expert steering group, we would like to thank Miranda Wolpert, Peter Fonagy, Catherine Newsome, Lucy Heyes, Helen Duncan, Jessica Sharp, David Lockwood, Jeremy Clark, Alexandra Lazaro, and Nilum Patel. NHS Digital commissioned the survey series with funding from the Department of Health and Social Care. We are particularly grateful to Dan Collinson, Alison Neave, Steven Webster, Jane Town, Ben Osborne and Kate Croft for their thoughtful

34 Read more

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017

educational needs. In some children, this may relate to the mental health disorder. The strong association between neurodevelopmental disorder and having special educational needs and an Education, Health and Care Plan probably reflects this. For example, children with ASD can find the social intensity, noisy bustle and repeated changes that school presents extremely difficult to deal with. Difficulties sitting still, focusing attention and controlling impulses, which are core to ADHD, present obvious difficulties in a classroom situation. There are strong associations between difficulties with reading and behavioural difficulties as well as neurodevelopmental disorders (Carroll et al., 2005). Other children may have special educational needs related to a long term physical health condition or disability, which may also undermine mental health (Stopplebein et al., 2005).
Show more

33 Read more

Children and equality : equality evidence relating to children and young people in England

Children and equality : equality evidence relating to children and young people in England

documents the experiences of a very small group of children and young people arriving as unaccompanied illegal entrants to the port. They recount their experiences of the journeys they made to get here, many of them harrowing They have then been held, questioned, medically assessed and their cases reviewed in terms of a need for social welfare and safeguarding services. Their experiences vary from being treated with the greatest care, to being questioned whilst still tired, hungry, thirsty and frightened, and sometimes sick. The worst cases we found were those who, without bene of a translator, a health or welfare assessment, were between 1995 and 2011 returned to their port of embarkation in France or Belgium unde
Show more

23 Read more

Vulnerable children and social care in England: a review of the evidence

Vulnerable children and social care in England: a review of the evidence

Educational outcomes for children in need are substantially poorer than for other pupils, albeit with variation between children with different social care classifications. Research shows that looked after children, particularly those who are in care for longer periods, fare better than non-looked- after CIN on some indicators. An examination of the CIN attainment gap over time would require more complex statistical analysis and is beyond the scope of this evidence review, but is an important question for future research.

15 Read more

Mapping children and young people's participation in England

Mapping children and young people's participation in England

surprisingly, learning and skills council have a clear focus on education and careers issues (through Connexions). The relatively high percentage of respondents reporting that children and young people were involved in decisions about ‘other’ issues mainly refers to their involvement in developing the services and programmes they use, particularly through the specialist programmes such as Children’s Fund and Connexions. Ten respondents reported involving children and young people in democratic processes, including the issue of the voting age. Some individual responses indicated the potential for involving children and young people in a wide range of issues – examples included licensing laws, anti-racism and equalities, employment bylaws, tourism, regional government and health service modernisation.
Show more

90 Read more

Educational outcomes of children in contact with social care in England: a systematic review

Educational outcomes of children in contact with social care in England: a systematic review

In all, exposure status was measured prior to the out- come (though in different ways) except Ellison and Hutchinson [16], where this could not be determined from the report. The DfE releases [14] compare children who are looked after on 31 March each year and have been for 12 months or more. For some recent years, children who were in need at the time of outcome ascer- tainment (and therefore were assessed as being in need prior to this) were also examined. However, these are blunt definitions that do not allow examination of any kind of ‘dose-response’ relationship and they do not in- clude children who are looked after for less than 12 months or children who were looked after but not on 31 March. The recent DfE report [13] also focused on chil- dren who were looked after or designated in need on 31 March 2016; however, it includes all CiN and CLA re- gardless of the length of time they had been involved with CSC. The group of CiN was also further disaggre- gated into two groups: those who were subject to a Child Protection Plan and those who were not. Sebba et al. [12] used the same data source as the DfE statistical releases and report but provided a more nuanced classi- fication, viz. (1) CLA on 31 March 2013 for a year or more, (2) CLA on that date for less than a year, (3) CiN on that date, or (4) not in need or care on that date. Al- though this classification does allow for analysis by dif- ferent levels of exposure, it still does not represent the full range of naturally occurring sub-groups of care and need trajectories which may be related with educational outcomes. Luke and O’Higgins [17], who, as previously outlined, used the same data as Sebba et al. [12], also used the same exposure categorisation except they fur- ther divided the long-term group into subgroups. The focus of O ’ Higgins [18] was asylum-seeking or refugee children in care for a year or more, compared to other CLA in care for a year or more, CiN and the general population. Exposure ascertainment for all of these sources was from administrative data from CSC re- corded in ‘ real time ’ and therefore limits the risk of mis- classification bias.
Show more

11 Read more

'Join us on our journey': Exploring the experiences of children and young people with type 1 diabetes and their parents

'Join us on our journey': Exploring the experiences of children and young people with type 1 diabetes and their parents

Recent  evidence  has  shown  that,  in  addition  to  poor  glycaemic  control,  there  are  alarming  differences in diabetic ketoacidosis admissions throughout the country and the quality  of  care  and  education that children and young people with T1DM receive is hugely variable. Compared with our  European and  global  counterparts  this  care  is below  the  highest  European  and  global  standards. 5   Furthermore,  inconsistencies  in  quality  of  care  is  highlighted  as  a  possible  contributory  factor  towards poor outcomes. Poor  quality  diabetes care  results  in  an  increased  risk  of  short‐ and long‐ term clinical  complications,  as  well  as  compromised  social and psychological  wellbeing,  leading  to  increased health  care  costs. 6  Therefore, it  makes  sense to ascertain  current standards  of  care and  identify  gaps in service  provision, before  making  recommendations in terms  of how  diabetes  care  needs to improve for the benefit of children and young people’s health outcomes.  
Show more

8 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...

Related subjects