Top PDF Social media and children's mental health: a review of the evidence

Social media and children's mental health: a review of the evidence

Social media and children's mental health: a review of the evidence

The UK Government has, over the last ten years, taken action to help address online safety concerns. Commissioned by the then Labour Government, the 2008 Byron Review of Internet Safety set out a series of recommendations on regulating internet access and building resilience in children and young people. The review led to the establishment of the cross-government UK Council for Child Internet Safety, which brings together 200 organisations across industries, academia, charities and law enforcement and parenting groups, working together to equip children and young people to identify and respond to online risks. UKCCIS collates internet safety research, conducts its own consultations and gives advice to industry providers. For example, in 2016, it established four new working groups covering digital resilience, technical developments, evidence and education. In September 2014, the Government 80 introduced age-appropriate lessons on e-safety across all
Show more

30 Read more

A systematic review of the use and effectiveness of social media in child health

A systematic review of the use and effectiveness of social media in child health

The authors’ conclusions tended to be positive with re- spect to the effectiveness and promise of social media as an intervention or promotional tool for child health. However, this was rarely supported by the statistical sig- nificance of the results. While this is a new technology with plenty of advocates and hypothesized benefits, there is no clear evidence that it is effective in improving health outcomes in children and youth. The included studies were of poor to moderate quality and many did not use rigorous study designs. Moving forward, an emphasis on well-conducted experimental designs and qualitative research, rather than on descriptive studies, would help to illuminate whether social media demon- strates effectiveness, and what characteristics contribute to that potential impact. This could include an increased focus on head-to-head comparisons of the effectiveness of specific social media tools, qualitative evaluations of their perceived strengths and limitations, and the use of changes in health outcomes as end-points.
Show more

15 Read more

Working together to improve the mental health of indigenous children: a systematic review

Working together to improve the mental health of indigenous children: a systematic review

Intersectoral interventions addressing Indigenous child mental health produced outcomes of improving childhood well-being, cultural identity, the capacity of families, accessibility of local and mainstream services, health service and organizational capacity, policy re- commendations, health service collaboration, and consumer satisfac- tion. The 11 studies evaluated or described the required conditions for implementing intersectoral care, which were involvement of commu- nity, accessibility and cost, collaboration between health disciplines, strong relationships between providers, consumers, and community, cultural sensitivity, and the capacity of organizations and health ser- vices to provide su ffi cient care. Strategies were diverse and included intervention and service delivery by both community and external workers, delivery across disciplines, building the capacity of staff and organizations, engaging the community, empowering families, in- dividual counselling, and adaption of care to Indigenous social de- terminants of health, histories, and sociocultural specificities. However, the evidence base is in early development, with few impact evaluation studies found. Furthermore, there was insu ffi cient explanation of how and where children and families engaged in interventions, primary care, and local services, and whether interventions were able to impact the social determinants of Indigenous children's mental health rather than just behavioural and lifestyle outcomes. There is also a need for improved cost evaluation research, and greater inclusion of Indigenous voice in evaluation. This scoping review informs the development of an intersectoral care intervention addressing Indigenous children's mental health.
Show more

11 Read more

Using social media to address Asian immigrants’ mental health needs: A systematic literature review

Using social media to address Asian immigrants’ mental health needs: A systematic literature review

First, the clinical value of social media needs to be clarified with systematic studies. For example, social media may affect the use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs (ATOD) in positive or negative ways. Researchers need to gather empirical evidence to understand whether or not—and how—social media interactions increase peer support, information exchange and behavioral change for ATOD. Major questions include: How can social media enhance traditional assessment of ATOD use? Will studying the social media platforms of ATOD users reveal substance use patterns better than traditional data collection methods that rely on participants’ recall of behaviors? How can we utilize social media to facilitate prevention and treatment of ATOD? Answers to these questions will add insights relevant to such fields as cancer control, in addition to addiction and alcohol abuse.
Show more

5 Read more

Martial arts as a mental health intervention for children? Evidence from the ECLS-K

Martial arts as a mental health intervention for children? Evidence from the ECLS-K

Participation in martial arts was measured through several questions in a structured, face to face, individual interview conducted by research staff with parents of children in the project. First, the parents were presented with this ques- tion: "In the last 12 months, did {CHILD} regularly get exercise through any of the following organizations?" Those who indicated that their children had gotten exer- cise then answered a following question: "What types of exercise or physical activity did {CHILD} get at the places you just mentioned?" Then martial arts were specifically inquired about, and the parent answered yes or no. The measure of classroom behavior was a composite of questions on a questionnaire, the Social Rating Scale, which was derived from the Social Skills Rating System [12] and completed by teachers during each wave of the study. Four questions constituted a self control subscale: respecting the property rights of others, controlling tem- per, accepting peer ideas for group activities, and respond- ing appropriately to pressure from peers. Six involved "approaches to learning": attentiveness, task persistence, eagerness to learn, learning independence, flexibility, and organization. Five involved interpersonal skills: forming and maintaining friendships; getting along with people who are different; comforting or helping other children; expressing feelings, ideas, and opinions in positive ways; and showing sensitivity to the feelings of others. Five involved externalizing problem behaviors: the frequency with which a child argues, fights, gets angry, acts impul- sively, and disturbs ongoing activities. Four involved internalizing problem behaviors: the apparent presence of anxiety, loneliness, low self-esteem, and sadness. For the third and fifth grade administrations of this question- naire, two items were added: an approaches to learning item, "child follows classroom rules," and an externaliz- ing item asking about the frequency with which a child talks during quiet study time. Although there were only four items in the official self-control subscale, the entire scale is weighted very heavily toward items involving self- control. There is hardly an item on the teacher question- naire that does not involve, in some way, the dimensions of self-control and self-confidence that many parents seek as outcomes when their children study martial arts. The items on this questionnaire highly resemble those of other questionnaires used by mental health professionals to assess children's psychological health.
Show more

9 Read more

Personalisation in mental health: A review of the evidence

Personalisation in mental health: A review of the evidence

The cornerstone of the Government’s approach to transforming social care and support through personalisation is the allocation of a personal budget (PB). Individuals are supported to assess their own needs, so that a care coordinator can determine whether they are eligible for social care funding. If eligible, they should then be told how much money they can expect to receive with which to meet their needs in ways that work for them. With their PB, individuals can design and purchase their own support from the public, private or voluntary sectors (DH. 2006a; Duffy, 2007) Direct payments are just one way of receiving a personal budget; service users can also choose to use existing services, or to ask their care coordinator or another agent to manage the money for them. They can also transfer money to an organisation that currently provides services they want to use. In fact, any combination of these options is possible. Individual budgets (IBs) are similar to PBs, but incorporate a number of different funding streams in addition to social care funding. The funding streams that could be included include: Access to Work, Supporting People, Independent Living Fund, Integrated Community Equipment Services, and Disabled Facilities Grants.
Show more

8 Read more

Vulnerable children and social care in England: a review of the evidence

Vulnerable children and social care in England: a review of the evidence

highlighting that their estimates are likely imprecise due to data gaps, overlap between groups and competing definitions of ‘vulnerability,’ the authors identified 32 groups at risk of poorer outcomes - these included children with special educational needs or disabilities (SEND), children in low-income families, undocumented children and those who are excluded from school. The authors estimate that 670,000 English children live in ‘high-risk’ situations, including with parents addicted to alcohol or drugs or in temporary accommodation, at least 800,000 have mental health disorders and 580,000 are in need of direct intervention.
Show more

15 Read more

Family support programs and adolescent mental health: review of evidence

Family support programs and adolescent mental health: review of evidence

However, several studies reported no effect or non-superior effects of the team-led family support treatments relative to comparison treatments for parental outcomes such as care- giver involvement in the child’s mental health services, parent problem-solving skills, coping skills, or perceived social sup- port. In terms of child outcomes, one study showed reductions in child disruptive behavior, while another study showed non- superior effects of the team-led family support intervention relative to comparison treatment on child behavior. In sum, although team-led treatment studies showed some positive effects on caregiver outcomes, child outcomes were more mixed, and there was minimal evidence demonstrating the superiority of team-led family support programs over com- parison treatments.
Show more

16 Read more

Alternatives to inpatient mental health care for children and young people (Review)

Alternatives to inpatient mental health care for children and young people (Review)

trials a number of different outcomes were measured using self, care giver and teacher reported data. The majority of differences were not significant. Henggeler et al reported improved function- ing in terms of externalising symptoms for young people receiving home based MST. They also spent fewer days out of school and reported greater consumer satisfaction with their treatment pro- gramme. At short-term follow up the control group had a greater improvement in terms of adaptability and cohesion, though this was not sustained at four months follow up. Rowland et al reported fewer days spent in out-of-home placement for the MST group. A Cochrane Review of intensive MST for families and youth with social, emotional and behavioural problems across a range of set- tings found no evidence to support the use of this type of treat- ment compared with other interventions. However, this reflects the poor quality of the research evidence rather than the actual effectiveness of individual alternative services (Littell 2005). Evidence for intensive home based crisis intervention using the ’Homebuilders’ model for crisis intervention as an alternative to inpatient care came from one randomised controlled trial (RCT) (Evans 2003). Although no differences were observed in either group for number of days in out-of-home placement, small im- provements favouring the control group were reported at short- term follow up for behaviour, and favouring those receiving the enhanced ’Homebuilders’ service in terms of adaptability and co- hesion. At six-month follow up this group also had a greater im- provement in social competency compared with the control group. However, the control group had a greater improvement in self concept.
Show more

60 Read more

The association between social capital and mental health and behavioural problems in children and adolescents: an integrative systematic review

The association between social capital and mental health and behavioural problems in children and adolescents: an integrative systematic review

In the case of FSC, parent–child relationships offered the most consistent protective role for children and ado- lescents, with the majority of the observed associations being in the positive direction. Parent–child relationships characterised by, for example, positive communication (Birndorf et al. 2005), feelings of nurturance (Yugo and Davidson 2007), support (Springer et al. 2006), and low levels of conflict (Ying and Han 2008) were associated with fewer reported mental health and behavioural prob- lems in the children/adolescents. There was no evidence to suggest that positive parent–child relationships are detrimental to children or adolescents’ mental health and/or behaviours; however, some sub-groups of children/ adolescents seem to derive more benefit than others from positive relationships with their parents (Glendinning and West 2007; Kliewer et al. 2004). The protective role of the parent–child relationship is well documented in relation to other outcomes. For example, parent–child relations characterised by appropriate control and high levels of responsiveness to the child’s needs (i.e. authoritative parenting) have been shown to be protective against adolescent health risk behaviours (Newman et al. 2008; Piko and Balázs 2012) and promote better educational outcomes (Dornbusch et al. 1987). Thus, is it important that evidence-based early interventions designed to foster positive parent–child relationships, such as the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program (Sanders 2008) are made avail- able and accessible to families.
Show more

16 Read more

Children’s Voices : a review of evidence on the subjective wellbeing of children with mental health needs in England. October 2017

Children’s Voices : a review of evidence on the subjective wellbeing of children with mental health needs in England. October 2017

Creative lessons such as English, Art, Dance and Drama were also raised as forums in which children were able to express their emotions through imagination and in hypothetical, impersonal and unreal ways, avoiding the risk of stigma and stress associated with sharing personal, real-life experiences with others; as young people explained: “The whole creative side like English, Art, Dance, Drama 'cause you can all express yourself through that sort of thing, but it doesn't necessarily have to be about you and people can't guess if it's about you or not so it's like expressing yourself without others knowing, that's what I find really good about it” (Kidger et al., 2009).
Show more

30 Read more

Social Marketing Campaigns and Children s Media Use

Social Marketing Campaigns and Children s Media Use

These efforts also use relationship-building strategies, and many have used community outreach as well as mass media components for a multi-channel message strategy. These strategies have clear applications to children’s media use and the effects of adver- tising on children’s health behavior. Market- ers have the ability to reach parents of young children and adolescents with targeted social marketing campaigns aimed at changing social norms about media use. They can pro- mote “smart”—limited in time and self-aware in terms of influences—media use and a cul- ture of parental involvement with messages that vary by children’s stage of development. At the same time, marketers are able to target adolescents with messages to promote “smart” media use and brand it as socially desirable behavior. The evidence suggests that social marketers would be most likely to succeed not by demonizing media use but by competing with media influences by providing appealing behavioral alternatives. Using positive mes- sages and imagery, they could promote alternatives to media use—for example, “branding” direct social interaction as cool and hip. Such a strategy could lead to a culture of more healthful engagement with, and under- standing of, media and its influences.
Show more

24 Read more

IMPACT OF SOCIAL MEDIA ON MENTAL HEALTH OF STUDENTS

IMPACT OF SOCIAL MEDIA ON MENTAL HEALTH OF STUDENTS

1 INTRODUCTION Social Media is taking part in different types of online networking; it is a routine movement that inquires about the children and teenagers by upgrading communication, social association, and even specialized skills (Horst H, 2010). Social networking sites offer different day by day openings for interfacing with companions, schoolmates, and individuals with common interests. (Ted Eytan 2010). During the most recent 5 years, the quantity of preadolescents and youths utilizing social networking sites has expanded significantly. As per the recent survey, 22% of adolescents sign on to their top choice social networking sites over 10 times each day, and the greater part of young people sign on to SNS more than once a day. Seventy-five percent of young people presently use phones, and 25% use them for social media, 54% use them for messaging, and 24% use them for instant messaging. Thus, a huge amount of this current age's social and enthusiastic advancement is happening while on the Internet and cell telephones. (Hinduja S, Patchin J, 2010). Recently, a few specialists have related social networking sites with a few mental disorders which include depression and anxiety. Since social networking sites are a moderately new wonder, numerous inquiries concerning the potential effect on mental health remain unanswered. (Igor Pantic, 2014). Therefore this research undergoes the impact of social media on mental health issues of the student.The objective of the study is to determine the impact of social media on mental health issues such as depression and anxiety of students.
Show more

5 Read more

A systematic review of reviews of interventions to promote mental health and prevent mental health problems in children and young people

A systematic review of reviews of interventions to promote mental health and prevent mental health problems in children and young people

The findings identifying the effectiveness of high-quality pre-school programmes such as the Perry Pre-School Programme and Head Start, which are aimed at improving self-esteem and behaviour as well as non mental health outcomes such as educational achievement, are supported by other reviews of reviews (NHS Centre for Research & Dissemination, 1997). The evidence about school-based programmes also broadly reflects that of two further reviews of reviews (Stewart-Brown et al., 2004; Lister-Sharp et al., 1999), which show that whole-school approaches involving changes to the school environment, personal skills development in class, and parental participation are on the whole more effective than purely classroom-based programmes (ibid). This review also found that interventions aimed at mental health promotion were more effective than those targeting mental health problems and lifestyle factors such as substance misuse (ibid). While one further review of reviews (Nicholas & Broadstock, 1999 - not included here) found limited evidence of the effectiveness for violence prevention
Show more

52 Read more

Social media in relation to mental health and personality

Social media in relation to mental health and personality

In contrast to Oberst et al. (2016), Reinecke and Trepte (2014) found a positive relationship with social media use. Reinecke and Trepte (2014) examined the degree of authenticity one exhibits on social media platforms. In a longitudinal study they found that the higher the degree of authenticity on social media platforms, the higher also their well-being (Reinecke & Trepte, 2014). A possible explanation could be that the current sample did not use social media as much as the study of Reinecke and Trepte (2014) as they reported an unequally distributed sample using social media networks. Literature reports that if there are a lot of frequent social media users representative in the sample, drawing inferences may lead to systematic errors (Parks, 2011). So, this difference in social media usage between the samples might explain the reason for not being able to have the same results as Reinecke and Trepte (2014). Social Media Use and Psychological Distress. ​ The findings of the current study also diverge with the findings from the findings of Grieve and Watkinson (2016) and Reinecke and Trepte (2014). In comparison to the current study, where psychological distress is positively related with social media use, past research indicated that social media use is negatively related to psychological distress. One explanation for this divergence might be that the current study applied a screen time application, while the other studies did not. So, the current study had more accurate social media usage
Show more

42 Read more

Children s Mental Health Services

Children s Mental Health Services

The State Department of Education, in partnership with Idaho school districts, is required to ensure that all children identified as having a disability according to the state criteria ages 3-21 receive a free, appropriate public education (FAPE). If a child is identified as having an emotional disturbance by the school, they are entitled to receive special education and related services at no cost to the parent. Special education is defined as specially designed instruction to meet the unique needs of a student.

34 Read more

Screening Children for Social Determinants of Health: A Systematic Review

Screening Children for Social Determinants of Health: A Systematic Review

independent, blind review for the full-text review. At the end of the title and abstract screen and full-text review phase, the lead investigators reviewed the included studies to confirm that all studies met the inclusion criteria. For any articles in question, the lead investigators convened to determine the articles’ inclusion statuses. At the conclusion of the full-text review, study authors reviewed the reference lists of included studies to identify any additional studies for inclusion. After reviewing the full texts of studies, the research team developed a data extraction tool in REDCap (a secure web platform for building and managing online databases and surveys) to extract the following information: study characteristics (ie, author and publication year, study type, study setting, age range of screened children, sample size of screened children, percent female sex of screened children, race and/or ethnicity of screened children, and study aims); screening tool characteristics (ie, average time to complete screener, screening setting, screening method, informant, training required for screening professionals, languages available, appropriate for low- literacy populations [ie, sixth grade reading level or lower], and validation); what SDOH domains the screener measured (per Healthy People 2020 guidelines; ie, economic stability, education, health and health care, neighborhood and build environment, and social and community context 2 ); and screening follow-up procedures (ie, results were discussed with
Show more

17 Read more

Studying Unemployment Effects on Mental Health: Social Media versus Traditional Approach

Studying Unemployment Effects on Mental Health: Social Media versus Traditional Approach

RQ3: Does the data scavenged from social media provide basis for both the consequences and 255. intervention techniques when it comes to unemployment[r]

11 Read more

Characterisation of mental health conditions in social media using Informed Deep Learning

Characterisation of mental health conditions in social media using Informed Deep Learning

In our study, we addressed the problem of characterising and automatically classifying user-generated content on the social media platform Reddit for the case of mental health conditions. We manually investigated data orig- inating from several subreddits to group the posts into overarching themes. The derived grouping of posts into themes was further evaluated by applying topic detection algorithms and results suggested that the theme-based grouping was valid. We then applied two classification strategies, a binary classification to determine whether or not a post contains mental health related content, and multiclass classification to identify the mental health condition (theme) a post is referring to. Our results show that by applying a CNN approach in the binary classi- fication task, we achieve an accuracy of 91.08% in distinguising the mental health related posts from unrelated posts. Further to that, we can identify Reddit posts as belonging to one of the 11 defined themes with an overall weighted precision of 0.72 and a recall of 0.71 (0.72 FM). Taken in conjunction, these results suggest that we can
Show more

11 Read more

Children at Risk: A Review of the Mental Health of Unaccompanied Refugee Minors

Children at Risk: A Review of the Mental Health of Unaccompanied Refugee Minors

This persistent mental health trajectory is not consistent in the literature; however, the trajectory seems to depend on the social support offered to the child. One study was conducted by Loughry and Flouri (2001) on the behavioral and emotional problems of former unaccompanied Vietnamese refugee children a few years after the children had been repatriated to Vietnam. The researchers compared this population with other minors who had never left Vietnam. These two groups were evaluated using a youth self-report, a self-efficacy measure, and a social support measure. Surprisingly, there were small differences between the two groups. There was little difference in the social support of the two groups. Ultimately, the researchers concluded that the time the children spent as unaccompanied minors in refugee camps in South East Asia did not lead to increased behavioral and emotional problems. This study suggests that if similar levels of social support are given to children post-migration, they may not experience the persistent mental health trajectory described in other research. The difference in long-term symptoms is also likely due to the repatriation of the Vietnamese children to their country of origin, adding to their social support. This social support buffer is unfortunately more difficult to achieve if the child is resettled to a foreign country.
Show more

8 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...