Top PDF Social work teaching partnership programme pilots : evaluation. Final research report, May 2016

Social work teaching partnership programme pilots : evaluation. Final research report, May 2016

Social work teaching partnership programme pilots : evaluation. Final research report, May 2016

to the survey, 91% in total of those who had begun or completed a single placement since November 2015 had done so in a statutory setting (the figure was 100% for four of the five HEIs in the partnerships). It must be noted that, in focus groups, a small number of student social workers thought there were benefits to having occasional placements in non-statutory settings, for example in PVIs whose work enabled them to better see and understand service users’ issues and experiences related to a particular specialism. SWTPs had all taken steps to review their placement matching approaches and to publish or update guidance. This included taking into account students’ preferences where possible and ensuring all students are given at least one statutory placement. Those students in a focus group at one SWTP who were on their second placement confirmed that the revised process was more efficient than the system it replaced and that needs and preferences were better catered for. All four partnerships identified the improved quality of placements as one of the main benefits for students of SWTPs. It was clear from the student survey that SWTPs have had a mixed success to date with promoting awareness and understanding of the CSWKSS in the curriculum with 27% of students responding to the survey saying that they were ‘not at all familiar’ with them. Exploring the issue in more depth in focus groups, students reported varying levels of awareness of the CSWKSS in the employers with whom they had their placements ranging from no mention of them at all to one LA where all staff had attended a launch session; it was clear that students were unsure too how they related to the Professional
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North London Children’s Efficiency Programme (NLCEP) residential innovation project: partnership evaluation: Research report: June 2016

North London Children’s Efficiency Programme (NLCEP) residential innovation project: partnership evaluation: Research report: June 2016

The Department for Education, under the Innovation Fund in Children’s Social Care, funded the North London Children’s Efficiency Programme (NLCEP) to provide a residential unit model for children in, or on the edge of, care and their families. As part of the innovation, the five north London boroughs of Camden, Enfield, Hackney, Haringey and Islington collaborated with the aim of developing a model of care and intervention that allows young people entering care to remain in the local area rather than being placed far away from home, as is often the case for looked after young people in London. A rationale for the partnership working is improving outcomes for young people on the edge of care by offering support to families and avoiding long term residential care placements. Reducing long term out of area care placements would also support cost-saving through pooling of resources, as well as providing existing add-on services (such as social work, education and Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services or CAHMS) from each local authority.
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North London Children’s Efficiency Programme (NLCEP) residential innovation project: partnership evaluation Research report: June 2016

North London Children’s Efficiency Programme (NLCEP) residential innovation project: partnership evaluation Research report: June 2016

The Department for Education, under the Innovation Fund in Children’s Social Care, funded the North London Children’s Efficiency Programme (NLCEP) to provide a residential unit model for children in, or on the edge of, care and their families. As part of the innovation, the five north London boroughs of Camden, Enfield, Hackney, Haringey and Islington collaborated with the aim of developing a model of care and intervention that allows young people entering care to remain in the local area rather than being placed far away from home, as is often the case for looked after young people in London. A rationale for the partnership working is improving outcomes for young people on the edge of care by offering support to families and avoiding long term residential care placements. Reducing long term out of area care placements would also support cost-saving through pooling of resources, as well as providing existing add-on services (such as social work, education and Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services or CAHMS) from each local authority.
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The back on track alternative provision pilots : final report

The back on track alternative provision pilots : final report

design blueprint for PRUs based on the formation of a series of statements of principles and practices to assist local authorities’ assessments of potential designs for PRU construction or refurbishment. Furthermore, this pilot also contains a significant workstream focussing on developing restorative approaches in PRU settings, involving the delivery of specialist training to staff and the promotion of organisational and cultural change in relation to conflict resolution. Work towards producing a curriculum development model aims to provide a curriculum self- review workbook through which PRU heads can improve their practice in the context of agreed London-wide curriculum principles. For example, these include the need to ensure that provision effectively responds to individual needs; PRU pupils achieve nationally accredited learning outcomes and that attainment is used as the key measure of accountability. A key element of this pilot’s overall design and operation centred on leadership by partnership involving contributions from number of key individuals and representatives of organisations, including London Councils, GLA and National Strategies.
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Making it Work: learning and evaluation contract: Final report

Making it Work: learning and evaluation contract: Final report

Principle 4: Employability services should be responsive to those with high needs: MIW was largely successful in targeting people facing substantial barriers to employability in all five partnership areas. The Big Lottery Fund in Scotland’s identification of lone par ent s as MIW’s key target group ensured that resources were effectively targeted at a particularly vulnerable population. MIW partnerships were asked specifically to target lone parents facing substantial barriers to employability. The Big Lottery Fund in S cotland’s leadership appears to have helped partnerships to achieve a consensus around the importance of targeting resources on individuals and communities facing greater disadvantage. There are important lessons about the benefits of a funding model that incentivised engagement with people further from the labour market – rather than rewarding ‘quick wins’. While there was considerable local flexibility in the design and shape of services, a partnership-based approach ensured that MIW participants reporting multiple barriers were able to access a range of different services.
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MAKING ADVICE WORK (CALDERDALE) EVALUATION FINAL REPORT

MAKING ADVICE WORK (CALDERDALE) EVALUATION FINAL REPORT

“Having a one-stop shop that pulls it all together has been brilliant. It makes such a difference…people prefer it. If it were possible to improve it, I would have a broader range of advocacies under the umbrella. I’m sure it has stopped duplication of work because people understand the trouble with working together is that peoples’ first reaction is to feel threatened, but you’ve got to look at it as a way to specialise in what you’re really good at instead of covering your back with other things so that somebody doesn’t encroach in what you’re doing. So you can leave the things they want to do and let them get on with it and you can be really detailed and develop your own speciality. That makes sense to me.” Stakeholder 16
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Report from the Commission: Euret Programme Evaluation; European Research on Transport; Final Report. COM (95) 450 final, 4 October 1995

Report from the Commission: Euret Programme Evaluation; European Research on Transport; Final Report. COM (95) 450 final, 4 October 1995

EURET, a specific research and technology programme in the field of transport 1990 to 1994 PROJECTS ECU 1.000 Percent 33 Air transport Trials in automated air/ground data exchange for ai[r]

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EVALUATION REPORT TORTURE REHABILITATION CENTRES. Final Report. MEDE European Consultancy. in partnership with the

EVALUATION REPORT TORTURE REHABILITATION CENTRES. Final Report. MEDE European Consultancy. in partnership with the

The case study in Nepal shows that in a conflict situation, prevention activities may reduce the number of clients consulting a rehabilitation centre. On the other hand, the participation of victims of torture in prevention activities, e.g. in the radio messages of CVICT, has an empowering effect on the victim and at the same time strengthens the message. The input of CAPS to the Truth Commission – the preparation and training of the members of the Commission and its volunteers, the preparation of and assistance to the witnesses before, during and after their testimonies – clearly had a beneficial effect on the victims, as well as on the functioning of the commission. The decision of CAPS, however, to establish a working relation with the police was not quite appreciated by their clients. To avoid such reactions it is recommendable to involve clients in the policies of a centre. In general, rehabilitation centres – whether in conflict, post conflict and/or in third, hosting countries - have a symbolic function for the victims: it is a symbol of recognition of their suffering. Preventive activities express the solidarity of the centres with the victims. In EU-countries (immigration) authorities may consider this solidarity as an over-involvement and put medical assessments for asylum
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Impact evaluation of the SEND Pathfinder Programme: research report

Impact evaluation of the SEND Pathfinder Programme: research report

Because Tom moved to a mainstream school in his final year of primary education, Eric had to make a case to get his son on to the pathfinder and after some negotiations this was allowed. Eric wanted to be part of the pathfinder because of the great difficulty he had had over the years trying to negotiate the system and get basic entitlements for his son: ‘The system felt bureaucratic, it wasn’t engaging, and it wasn’t helpful for families.’ Getting Tom correctly diagnosed, keeping in him in the right school, and securing the right types of support had often felt like a battle. By joining the pathfinder he hoped to get Tom more accurately diagnosed and assessed and then use this information to plan a more complete and joined up package of care. Eric also hoped that by participating in the pathfinder, he could help to develop an approach in which all families, regardless of their skills and level of confidence, can access appropriate care and support.
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Evaluation of Skills for Work pilot courses : final report

Evaluation of Skills for Work pilot courses : final report

6.51 Analysis of SQA data showed that overall 85.6 per cent of the SfW candidates who had been entered to complete their courses in July 2007 had achieved a full SfW qualification. 10 As can be seen from Table 5, pass rates varied for the different courses – with pass rates being over 80 per cent for most courses and the highest rates being recorded for Financial Services (Intermediate 2) and Hairdressing (Intermediate 1). Pass rates were lowest for Construction Crafts (Intermediate 1 and 2) and Sports and Recreation (Intermediate 2). However, for some of these courses only very few young people were expected to complete in July 2007 and the overall pass rates were affected by very few individuals not passing these courses. It is possible that some of these may, for example, have been incorrectly entered for completion in July 2007 and this may have adversely affected the overall pass rate for these courses. The SQA data also showed that more than four-fifths (85.4 per cent) of those 211 candidates who completed the course without achieving a full award had achieved at least one unit or more (which they could carry forward to gain a full award in the future).
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National Evaluation of the Troubled Families Programme:
Process evaluation final report

National Evaluation of the Troubled Families Programme: Process evaluation final report

57 such as the Family Star 14 , and latterly the modified Family Star Plus 15 , alongside a wide range of more bespoke assessment tools designed to measure specific areas of family functioning (e.g. parenting skills and confidence, social and emotional wellbeing). In contrast to the more formally administrative function of the CAF of E-CAF, the Family Star was commonly valued for its emphasis on giving children and families a voice within the assessment process. This was also reflected in the subsequent action planning and review process. Despite the popularity of the Family Star and its visual representation of data for helping to validate progress with families, a number of local authorities had encountered difficulties using the format with some families during the early stages of the intervention. It was reported that families sometimes tended to overestimate their present abilities to cope, either because they were not yet in a position to recognise that some behaviours or routines were problematic, or because the relationship with the worker was a new one and the family was anxious to portray a sense of being in control. As a consequence, workers commonly found that the Family Star ratings worsened considerably in-between the early stages of the assessment and subsequent monitoring points. Troubled Families
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Learning Agreement Pilots evaluation : synthesis report

Learning Agreement Pilots evaluation : synthesis report

The most successful method of recruiting young people to the programme was through direct contact with the young person (eg 36 per cent of participants in the survey first heard about LAP via a telephone call from an adviser). In the first year, advisers found trying to contact the right sort of young people a frustrating task, especially if they had changed their status or contact details from the information held on the CCIS database. By the second year, Connexions staff had got much better at ensuring their information was accurate and at targeting their contacting efforts to maximise the chances of approaching eligible young people. This included much closer liaison with school-based advisers to promote LAP to young people before they completed year 11.
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The evaluation of the Mockingbird Family Model
Final evaluation report
October 2016

The evaluation of the Mockingbird Family Model Final evaluation report October 2016

disruption rates are found among strained carers and stress is one factor influencing decisions to cease fostering (Farmer, Lipscombe and Moyers, 2005; Wilson, Sinclair and Gibbs, 2000). However, there is evidence to suggest that respite care, may reduce some of that strain, contributing to greater placement stability and higher retention rates among carers (Brown, Moraes and Mayhew, 2005; Farmer, Lipscombe and Moyers, 2005). Moreover, social networks have been positively associated with placement stability (Sinclair et al. 2007; Murray, Tarren-Sweeny and France, 2011), and existing research has found that peer support between foster carers can be highly beneficial. Peer support has been found to facilitate emotional and practical support, providing opportunities for carers to learn from one another’s experiences (Ivanova and Brown, 2010), and be reassured to discover that others have faced similar challenges (Pallett et al. 2002). Studies have highlighted the benefit of a shared understanding between foster carers and the value that foster carers place on talking to someone who knows what it is like (Nutt, 2006; McInerny, 2009; Cavazzi, Guilfoyle and Sims, 2010; Blythe et al. 2011; Sebba et al. 2016). Peer support has also been linked to decreasing foster carers’ stress, reducing disruptions in placements, and improvements to the retention of foster carers (Luke and Sebba, 2013).
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An Evaluation of the Further Mathematics Support Programme : Research Report

An Evaluation of the Further Mathematics Support Programme : Research Report

construct and analysis, and focused on those who had experienced a "change" in security status. As part of the analytical process the security rating was calculated of centres sampled in the first wave of interviews. Annexe 1 describes in detail the relationship of the sample to security and FMSP involvement for 2013/14. In summary, from FMSP data at the point of sampling 28 had engaged in CPD, 17 in enrichment and 5 in tuition. It is important to note that involvement is for a single year and centres may have participated in FMSP in other years, this was confirmed by analysis of the telephone interviews. Teachers were asked about their centres' participation in Mathematics and Further Mathematics A level, and progression to A level Mathematics from GCSE. They were also asked about their involvement with the FMSP including their views on the programme, implementation in their centre and its effectiveness. Teacher interviews were analysed thematically (Ryan and Russell Bernard, 2003).
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Programme of action research to inform the evaluation of the additional learning needs pilot developmental phase : final report

Programme of action research to inform the evaluation of the additional learning needs pilot developmental phase : final report

4.30. As a consequence of both its complexity and visibility, the IDP came to dominate and unbalance the programme. Although it was anticipated that it would be the most complex element, it sucked in increasing amounts of the Welsh Government’s and the pilots’ time and energy to the detriment of other important elements of the pilot projects. It provoked the most discussion, and the collaborative management model adopted by the Welsh Government statutory reform team (outlined above) gave ample space for members of the pilots, who expressed strong and often competing visions, to articulate their views. Although at times pilots A and D felt somewhat sidelined, because of the attention paid to the IDP, good progress was made in developing the quality assurance system and ALNCo role. However, the attention paid to the IDP also meant that much less attention was paid to other key elements of the proposed reforms and to the integration of the different elements, a critical element in planning a system-wide reform. It was only towards the end of the developmental phase, once progress on key elements of the IDP, including its structure and planning processes had been made, that the focus shifted back to integration.
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Teaching research methods to social work students: a transnational critical reflection

Teaching research methods to social work students: a transnational critical reflection

You are invited to take part in a research project that seeks social work students' reflections on the experience of studying research within their degree, how prepared they feel they are to be practitioner researchers and, also, to ascertain their views on how the research teaching process may be improved. The study is being conducted by Dr Nonie Harris, Professor Ilango Ponnuswami and Dr Desley Harvey, and will contribute to research methodology teaching and learning in the Bachelor of Social Work and Master of Social Work at James Cook University and Bharathidasan University.
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Evaluation of Education Maintenance Allowance pilots : young people aged 16 to 19 years : final report of the quantitative evaluation

Evaluation of Education Maintenance Allowance pilots : young people aged 16 to 19 years : final report of the quantitative evaluation

Combining EMA eligible cases lost through attrition and those dropped through inconsistencies in qualifications, only about a third of the original first cohort (32.9 per cent) was available for this analysis. This contrasts with almost half of those from the second cohort (48 per cent). In the light of this, it may be expected that data from the second cohort would be more reliable than from the first. In addition, the introduction of EMA may have given rise to teething problems for schools and young people alike. A focus on the second cohort alone may give a clearer picture of the full potential of EMA. Finally, curriculum changes dramatically changed the options available to the two cohorts. Young people in the first cohort were highly unlikely to have undertaken AS Levels as these only became widely available in the autumn of 2000. Similarly, advanced GNVQs were available to young people in the first cohort but not to those in the second, while AVCEs were primarily available to the second cohort and not the first. As a consequence of these changes, it may be argued that the second cohort of young people involved in this evaluation
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Employer training pilots : first year evaluation report

Employer training pilots : first year evaluation report

However, a number of challenges still remain. Most of the learners are engaged in studying for an NVQ level 2, rather than basic skills. A number of measures have been put in place in the existing and new pilots to increase the engagement of employers and learners in basic- skills training towards a qualification. We will be looking to see the effect of these measures on overall participation. Many basic-skill deficiencies only come to the surface during the course of studying for an NVQ, and in many cases, support is now being provided along side the NVQ training. This may be a more effective form of provision, although the issues involved may not be picked up in full by the evaluation as it is currently structured (as we currently have no quantitative way of measuring basic-skill support provided in this way). In Chapter 3 we found that around 20 per cent of the current employer participants were in the target group of hard-to-reach workplaces, without a particularly positive track record on training low-skilled employees. While many of the remainder meet the ‘hard-to-reach’ definition in some way (eg by being small), a substantial proportion (30 per cent of workplaces employing some 40 per cent of ETP learners) are from the care sector, where there is a legislative requirement to increase the proportion of qualified staff. They could, therefore, be assumed to be looking for training in the absence of the scheme. Our evaluation also shows that the large proportion of the employers so far involved have a relatively positive approach to training – thus, although they may not be actively training their low skilled employees and are hard to reach in some ways, they are not altogether hard to convince about the value of the initiative. Increasing the proportion of hard-to-reach employers and those without a history of training will be important if pilots are to truly transform training cultures and minimise deadweight.
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Evaluation of the Work Experience Placement Trials: research report

Evaluation of the Work Experience Placement Trials: research report

coordinator, who has built up a relationship with local employers. The team wanted to extend work experience placements to LLDD some of whom have multiple disabilities and others who are on Foundation Learning courses. The team used trial funding to build up a bank of employers who would take these young people, providing as much flexibility as possible to fit in with employer preferences. A senior leader explained that ‘this cohort needed support and we wanted to give them opportunities as part of our holistic approach. We also feel we are helping to educate employers to understand the needs of individuals’. Staff pointed out that finding the right placements is very time- consuming and running the system is an intensive task because of the level of support these students require. Trial funding has been used to pay for students’ bus fares, uniforms and the use of support assistants’ time and for training for employers’ staff. The work experience coordinator reported that ‘we have got some very willing partners as a result of the trial. Our focus on LLDD has made choosing the right employers very important. We know that most of them will help in the future too because we have prepared the students well and employers were aware of what to expect’. Students did their placements in a supermarket office and shop, a housing association office, a large food and drink distribution company and a deaf centre charity. The students thought they had benefitted from the work experience and valued the opportunity it had given them to show how well they could do: ‘I learnt a lot from it, like how to do Excel spreadsheets and how finances work’ and ‘I’m a lot more confident now – I helped another student there who wasn’t sure what to do’ were typical comments. Employer feedback was equally positive: ‘The impact is very positive. They pick up
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The reliability programme: final report

The reliability programme: final report

While for mathematics and science, answers can be reasonably objectively marked, in English, particularly the writing component, answers are subject to potentially substantial human subjective judgement. Therefore, inconsistency in marking between markers would be expected to be higher for the English tests than for the mathematics and science tests, although procedures such as the development of a clear mark scheme and proper marker training have been adopted to improve marking reliability. It is also noticed that for all the three subjects, the standard error of measurement was estimated using Cronbach’s alpha. For the mathematics and science tests, Cronbach’s alpha may be assumed to be a good approximation of the test reliability, but the degree to which it also captures marking unreliability for the English tests is not entirely clear. Further work on the effect of marking unreliability on Cronbach’s alpha would be required.
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