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Solomon Islands national situation analysis

Solomon Islands national situation analysis

Figure 3. Proportion of households that have “fished in the past year” according to 1999 Census data available in the SPC POPGIS program. The 1999 census reported that 45% of the labor force (those aged 15 years and over who stated that they do some kind work) was mainly occupied by unpaid activities, largely subsistence farming, fishing within coral reef-related artisanal fisheries, and household-related craft work. At least one estimate suggests that 75% of the total labor force is dedicated to agriculture, fisheries and forestry (The World Factbook 2009). Coconut is an important food crop and a valued cash crop in the form of copra, while staple foods are roots and tubers such as cassava, sweet potatoes and yams. At the macro level, fishery products (mostly tuna) account for 19% of the total export revenues of the country. Apart from their contribution to output and foreign exchange earnings, fish and fish products are also valuable food sources for the population. The 2006 National Household Income and Expenditure Survey indicated that fish accounted for 73% of total expenditures on animal protein. In this context, AAS provide an essential source of income, food and well-being for a large part of the Solomon Islands’ population. High reliance on the state of natural resources raises alarming prospects for the future well-being of the majority of the population given the threats that have been identified to
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Operational research to inform a sub national surveillance intervention for malaria elimination in Solomon Islands

Operational research to inform a sub national surveillance intervention for malaria elimination in Solomon Islands

A mixed method study was carried out on Santa Isabel in late 2009 and early 2010. The quantitative component was a detailed mass blood survey (MBS) of approximately one-third of the estimated total population of 26,221 [4], to determine the prevalence of malaria in Isabel Province. Using an accurate list of villages on Santa Isabel, the spa- tially stratified survey design used was aimed at achieving uniform geographical coverage of populated areas of the island including coastal and inland zones. This was a modified grid-based design whereby a starting point on the coastline was randomly selected, and subsequent sampling points were evenly placed along the coast, with the nearest village to each sampling point selected for inclusion in the study. In the southern area of the island, where some inland communities were located, a grid was overlain the area in a geographical information system (GIS) and the villages closest to the nodes of the grid were selected for inclusion. Access to the selected villages was achieved by boat and land-based survey teams. Where logistical constraints prevented selected villages being accessed, the next nearest village was selected. A total of 8,554 people from all age groups participated in the MBS. The survey was carried out at the start of the malaria season (October) to coincide with entomological surveys also contributing to the situational analysis of Isabel Province (reported elsewhere) [19].
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Operational research to inform a sub-national surveillance intervention for malaria elimination in Solomon Islands

Operational research to inform a sub-national surveillance intervention for malaria elimination in Solomon Islands

A mixed method study was carried out on Santa Isabel in late 2009 and early 2010. The quantitative component was a detailed mass blood survey (MBS) of approximately one-third of the estimated total population of 26,221 [4], to determine the prevalence of malaria in Isabel Province. Using an accurate list of villages on Santa Isabel, the spa- tially stratified survey design used was aimed at achieving uniform geographical coverage of populated areas of the island including coastal and inland zones. This was a modified grid-based design whereby a starting point on the coastline was randomly selected, and subsequent sampling points were evenly placed along the coast, with the nearest village to each sampling point selected for inclusion in the study. In the southern area of the island, where some inland communities were located, a grid was overlain the area in a geographical information system (GIS) and the villages closest to the nodes of the grid were selected for inclusion. Access to the selected villages was achieved by boat and land-based survey teams. Where logistical constraints prevented selected villages being accessed, the next nearest village was selected. A total of 8,554 people from all age groups participated in the MBS. The survey was carried out at the start of the malaria season (October) to coincide with entomological surveys also contributing to the situational analysis of Isabel Province (reported elsewhere) [19].
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The evaluation of conservation planning policy effectiveness in the Solomon Islands: A case study of the Solomon Islands National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan

The evaluation of conservation planning policy effectiveness in the Solomon Islands: A case study of the Solomon Islands National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan

70 Conservation division is still under constraint because only a small part of the Ministry is directly responsible for conservation activities. The participants concurred that the government was not doing enough on NBSAP policy implementation, or providing resources for the initiative. Thus, Timothy warned that “if the NGOs pack up and go today it would definitely leave a very big gap…”. In addition, Timothy stressed that the shifting of the NBSAP policy implementation was due to a change in the organisations situational capacity from when the policy was first formulated. On this line of reasoning Timothy explained difficulties TNC faced when trying to implement the NBSAP policy. He said, “… with the geographic information system (GIS) and financial sustainability on the NBSAP policy that are assigned for TNC to implement since we now don‟t have the necessary capacity these two components of the NBSAP policy would now be affected”. In this situation the NBSAP needs to be re-enacted and adjusted (Faludi 1997), rather than concluding that it has failed to implement the activity. On another note Agnes believed that the MECDM should build the “capacity of the provincial governments to implement the activities of the NBSAP policy. Also we should provide the provincial governments with sufficient funds and technical capacity. Furthermore, at least the MECDM should have staff in all the provinces”. Because of insufficient involvement of the government, implementation of, and assistance with, conservation activities relating to the NBSAP policy are
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Solomon Islands joint annual report 2004

Solomon Islands joint annual report 2004

It seems therefore that a low priority is still being given to environmental sustainability in favour of raising financial revenues and macro-economic growth. Major donor initiatives and inputs are needed to prevent the already dire situation from worsening even further. As yet no comprehensive environmental profile has been prepared, although a recent assessment of coral reef and marine resources has been carried out. A National Environmental Management Strategy (NEMS) was prepared in 1992 and remains as valid today, but implementation of the strategies incorporated in the report is lacking. An Environment Act with sound objectives and powers has been recently passed but not yet applied and requires appropriate regulations to be drawn up and effected. The impact of poor environmental practices on rural incomes and tourism is also significant. The preparation of a country environmental profile that will bring environmental matters into mainstream development planning is needed and could be incorporated in the preparation of an agricultural strategy. A summary of the main environmental needs/issues, programmes/activities required and the main critical points are presented in Annex 14.
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Sub-national governance in post-RAMSI Solomon Islands

Sub-national governance in post-RAMSI Solomon Islands

Sub-national governance in post-RAMSI Solomon Islands Debra McDougall University of Western Australia Over the past decade, RAMSI has stabilized the state in Solomon Islands, but many basic problems of governance remain. Among the most pressing is the failure of the state to effectively engage with and deliver services to the rural people who comprise the majority of the population. Since the colonial era, underfunded administrations have struggled to govern these geographically dispersed islands, but many ordinary citizens and public servants feel that subnational government functioned better twenty or thirty years ago than it does today, even after ten years of intensive statebuilding. Frustration about failure of subnational govrnment is felt widely and deeply in Solomon Islands, but recent attempts to address this failure, which have included a dramatic expansion of development funds administered directly by Members of Parliament, have arguably made the situation worse.
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Solomon Islands: Western Province situation analysis

Solomon Islands: Western Province situation analysis

Constitution and the Provincial Act 1997 to govern the province on behalf of the central government (Lane 2006). The provincial government is located in Gizo, the provincial capital. Western Province is separated into nine constituencies broadly based on geography: North Vella Lavella; South Vella Lavella; Gizo/ Kolombangara; Shortland Islands; Simbo/ Rannogga; Marovo; North New Georgia; West New Georgia-Vonavona; and South New Georgia-Rendova. A member from each constituency represents Western Province in the national parliament. The province is further divided into a total of 26 wards that are each represented in the provincial government by an elected member on a 4-year term – the full assembly meets twice a year (Rural Development Division 2001). The provincial executive is the ruling or governing structure of the provincial government and consists of 13 of the 26 members. The executive meets twice a month (unless urgent matters arise) to direct provincial government policy and activities, including the use of provincial budgets that are provided by the national government, or from tax and fee revenue collected by the provincial government. All leading positions such as the premier, deputy premier and provincial ministers are filled from the provincial executive. Senior management positions, including the provincial scretary, deputy secretary, treasurer and planner are seconded from the central government to the provincial government, and work closely with the provincial executive by providing technical advice and helping to plan with other ministries to improve service delivery.
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Malnutrition in rural Solomon Islands: An analysis of the problem and its drivers

Malnutrition in rural Solomon Islands: An analysis of the problem and its drivers

coupled with a trend toward a market-based economy, creates the opportunity to buy store foods, which are perceived to have a higher wealth status. Pacific nations are reliant on imported and processed foods with availability and accessibility driven by economic and political ties, donor aid and trade links (Snowdon & Thow, 2013). Multi-sec- tor policies have the potential to alter food supply and contribute to healthier populations in the region, yet the impacts of existing policies and policy changes on diets are poorly understood (Thow et al., 2011, Snowdon & Thow, 2013). Sugar sweetened beverage taxes have, for example, been introduced in a number of Pacific countries, yet there remains a paucity of empirical data on the impact of the tax in addressing the NCD crisis (McDonald, 2015). Our findings revealed the high consumption of table sugar (primar- ily in ‘tea’) and highlights that policy in this sector need to consider the broader food environment and consumption patterns of processed foods. The recent development of a national multi-sec- toral food security, food safety and nutrition policy in Solomon Islands (2016-2020) provides the basis for collective action to reduce malnutrition in Solomon Islands. However, sufficient capac- ity and support will be required to enable governments to imple- ment action plans to support this and other nutrition policies and frameworks.
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An Analysis of the Responses to Open-ended Questions in the Solomon Islands\u27 Survey

An Analysis of the Responses to Open-ended Questions in the Solomon Islands\u27 Survey

Avondale College of Higher Education This chapter reports the results of a survey conducted to determine how workers in Seventh-day Adventist educational institutions in the Solomon Islands perceive the mission of the church and how they believe their educational institution is different from other similar educational institutions. The study was conducted in the same manner as described in chapter 6 for the Australian survey and utilised the same methodology and analysis of data.

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Guns, money and politics: disorder in the Solomon Islands

Guns, money and politics: disorder in the Solomon Islands

After considerable wavering, Prime Minister Kemakeza announced that his government was opposed to any form of toxic dumping in the Solomon Islands (SICA Press Release 18 [r]

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Facing up to the challenges of development in Solomon Islands

Facing up to the challenges of development in Solomon Islands

investment, both foreign and domestic. Much of this work to date has revolved around improving governance by increasing transparency of decision-making and thus reducing corruption. Logging and fisheries pose particular challenges given the large rents and the challenge of ensuring sustainable management of these resources. Reef fish around the heavily populated areas, for example, are already being harvested well beyond regenerative capacity. Work has commenced on new foreign investment legislation and a new tax system, both of which are aimed at reducing the regulatory barriers to investment. The government signed the Pacific Islands Air Services Agreement on 12 May 2005; it is hoped that this ‘open skies’ policy will reduce the market power of the incumbents and thus lower the costs of air transport. The government has also signed the Pacific Islands Civil Aviation Safety and Security Treaty in the hope of improving air safety. Enabling legislation for the above were being drafted at the time of writing. Trade liberalisation is continuing with tariff rates reduced from five bands, ranging from 5 to 70 per cent in 1998, to three bands ranging from 5 to 20 per cent in 2004. While some progress has been made in the aviation sector, little has been done to improve inter-island shipping. The latter is important given the fragmented domestic market and the critical role of inter-island shipping in raising private sector output. One option for the central government in reducing regulatory barriers to investments in transportation and communications infrastructure would be to take carriage of policies for the two sectors. This will reduce anomalies between provinces and provide greater security of market access for investors. While regulatory reforms are targeted at reducing red tape, obtaining secure, long- term access to land remains a difficult issue. Landowner concerns continue with respect to both the gold mine and the oil palm
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Protestant missions in the Solomon Islands 1849-1942

Protestant missions in the Solomon Islands 1849-1942

Four missions are concerned in this study: the Anglican Melanesian Mission, founded by Bishop Selwyn of New Zealand in 1849, the Methodist mission, sent to the group in 1902 by the Metho[r]

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A grammar of Lavukaleve : a Papuan language of the Solomon Islands

A grammar of Lavukaleve : a Papuan language of the Solomon Islands

The Papuan languages of the Solomon Islands which are still spoken are Lavukaleve, Bilua spoken on Vella Lavella, Baniata spoken on Rendova, Savosavo spoken on Savo Island, and some of t[r]

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Building social and ecological resilience to climate change in Roviana, Solomon Islands: PASAP country activity for Solomon Islands: Brief review: climate change trends and projections for Solomon Islands

Building social and ecological resilience to climate change in Roviana, Solomon Islands: PASAP country activity for Solomon Islands: Brief review: climate change trends and projections for Solomon Islands

As part of the Australian Government’s International Climate Change Adaptation Initiative (ICCAI), the Pacific Adaptation Strategy Assistance Program (PASAP) aims to enhance the capacity of partner countries to assess key vulnerabilities and risks, formulate adaptation strategies and plans, mainstream adaptation into decision-making, and inform robust long- term national planning and decision-making in partner countries. The Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency contracted University of Queensland (UQ) and University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) to lead the project: “Building social and ecological resilience to climate change in Roviana, Solomon Islands” (2010-2012). Under this project The WorldFish Center was subcontracted to undertake outputs 5 and 6 of Objective three: (5) Review of climate change evidence and projections for the study area and (6) Vulnerability and adaptation assessment for the study area. This report addresses the first of these and comprises a desktop review of climate change evidence and projections for the study area .
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The Beginning of Adventist Education in the Solomon Islands

The Beginning of Adventist Education in the Solomon Islands

Nevertheless, there were a number of factors which helped Adventists succeed in spite of the challenges and outright opposition. By the time the Adventist missionaries arrived, the frequency of contact with Europeans meant there was much wider acceptance of missionaries than there had been in the nineteenth century (Whiteman, 1983, 171). Increased contact with Europeans also fuelled an interest in learning English and provided motivation to adopt Christianity. It was evident from the lifestyle of the white missionaries that they had something that worked, and therefore their rituals were considered by many to be more powerful than their own (Whiteman, 1983, 66). Accepting the Christian methodology, they assumed, would help them to also acquire the blessings of the Europeans (Steley, 1983, 90). Moreover, the creation of a British protectorate in the southern Solomons in 1893 had made the country safer since the commissioner was charged with maintaining law and order and suppressing head- hunting which had previously been common in this part of the western Solomon Islands, perpetrated mainly by people from Roviana.
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Solomon Islands joint annual report 2002

Solomon Islands joint annual report 2002

Solomon Islands is situated to the east of Papua New Guinea and the north east of Australia. The country is made up of six large and several hundred smaller islands, most of them populated, with a total land area of 27 990 km² and an ocean area within an exclusive economic zone of 1.34 million km². The population of 450 000 is growing at 2.8% per year; 42% of the total population is under the age of 15. In the age range 5-14 years, 57% attended school during 1999². 15% of the population live in urban areas, with Honiara, the capital, being by far the largest urban centre (pop. 49 000). Only 23% of the population of 14 years of age and over are involved in paid work. This highlights the importance of the subsistence sector (agriculture and fishing) and of remittances from overseas.
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Review of Marine Turtles Legislation in Solomon Islands

Review of Marine Turtles Legislation in Solomon Islands

Importance of Marine Turtles Locally: Marine turtles have for centuries played important roles in the lives of Solomon Islanders, and this can be seen from ancient to most recent artworks, turtle figures in museums, contemporary carvings and many different local legends and beliefs. While myths and legends of these graceful creatures have painted colorful stories in the history of Solomon Islands, marine turtles still remain an integral part of socio-cultural life of the coastal communities. Turtle meat and eggs are used as delicacy during special occasions, while the shells and oil are used for cultural and traditional purposes. For example, in Are’ Are, South Malaita, the turtle shell is used in shell money making. Local craftsman and women make traditional ornaments such as rings, bangles and earrings from turtle shells and are sold in local markets for cash income.
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Solomon Islands: Economic and Financial Reform Program

Solomon Islands: Economic and Financial Reform Program

17. Enhanced corporate governance of state owned enterprises. The government was required under another program policy action to settle arrears owed by Solomon Islands Water Authority (SIWA) to Solomon Islands Electricity Authority (SIEA). These SOEs—along with the Minister of Finance and the Minister of Mines, Energy, and Rural Electrification—signed a final debt settlement agreement on 31 May 2012 that included provision for (i) a capital injection by the government to SIWA to be passed on to SIEA; (ii) the conversion of some of SIWA’s debt to SIEA into an interest-free loan; and (iii) a write-off of the remainder of SIWA’s debt to SIEA. 18. To enhance the corporate planning processes of the country’s eight SOEs, the program required and supported the preparation of statements of corporate objectives. This also complied with the country’s 2007 SOE legislation requirement that each SOE prepare and submit this statement as a rolling 3-year document to the responsible minister every year. The SOEs all prepared and submitted their statements for 2013. 11 In addition, the government began to collaborate through the MOFT’s economic reform unit with the Solomon Islands Chamber of
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Women and development in Solomon Islands : an alternative approach

Women and development in Solomon Islands : an alternative approach

Alice Puia (1995) contends that urban development has led to increased violence against women. There is more and more emphasis put on this issue by women's organisations as it has become a major problem. The SIDT recognises the importance of correcting this problem and, therefore, organises programs in educating both men and women (SIDT 1992). The SIDT works with other women's organisations, in conjunction with the police, in an effort to educate people on eliminating violence. Furthermore, with increasing urbanisation and the resulting loss of proximity to relations, customary mechanisms of remedy are no longer accessible to women who experience this type of violent behaviour. Women's organisations such as The National Council of Women and the Women's Development Division, state that the problems of low status of women, economic stress and rapid social change contribute to domestic violence (Puia
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Power, Media and Development: A Study of the Solomon Islands

Power, Media and Development: A Study of the Solomon Islands

  Denzin,  Lincoln  and  Smith  use  a  metaphor,  when  representing  qualitative  research,  of   the   researcher   being   the   equivalent   of   the   bricoleur.   The   bricoleur   makes   do   by   adapting  the  bits  and  pieces  of  the  world  to  produce  bricolage,  which  is  the  “poetic   making   do”   or   more   pragmatically   “a   pieced   together   set   of   representations   that   is   fitted  to  the  specifics  of  a  complex  situation”  (Denzin,  Lincoln,  &  Smith,  2008,    p.  4).  I   find   this   a   more   fitting   introduction   to   positionality   and   reflexivity   in   cross-­‐cultural   research   as   it   is   a   ‘piecing   together’,   and   the   situations   are,   by   their   very   nature,   complex  as  they  are  from  the  worldviews  of  both  the  researched  and  the  researcher.   As   with   all   researchers   I   have   my   own   unique   positionality.   I   come   to   this   research   crossing  disciplines  as  a  media  professional  before  a  development  sector  professional,   a  woman,  a  mother,  middle-­‐class  and  white.  My  interpretation  of  my  data  today  will   be  different  from  my  interpretation  as  a  younger  woman.  This  all  drives  how  I  see  the   world   and   interpret   it.   All   these   factors   were   instrumental   in   how   I   framed   my   questions  and  the  responses  of  the  interviewees  during  my  research.  They,  and  I,  were   influenced   in   our   interactions   by   our   race,   age,   sex   and   also   spatial   factors   such   as   issues   at   hand   or   “location   in   time   and   space”   (Mullings,   1999,   p.   338).   Mullings   describes   the   balancing   act   of   positionality   in   a   piece   of   research.   She   found   herself   drawing   on   different   parts   of   her   identity   to   produce   a   form   of   empathy   with   her   interviewees   that   “involved   a   constant   shifting   of   the   multiple   axes   upon   which   my   identity   rested”   (Mullings,   p.   341).   Mullings’   learning   here   was,   in   the   end,   the   positionality  of  those  she  interviewed  was  as  ‘cross-­‐cutting’  as  her  own.    
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