Top PDF 40599871-2-Strategic-Human-Resource-Management-Book

40599871-2-Strategic-Human-Resource-Management-Book

40599871-2-Strategic-Human-Resource-Management-Book

The Quality Movement The recent emphasis on 'quality issues' has come about, in part, as a result of the success of Japanese companies and in particular in their commitment to improving production processes. Total quality management (or TQM as it is better known) was a phrase coined by Ken Holmes in his work of the same name, when he defined quality as 'the totality of features and characteristics of a product or service which bears on its ability to meet stated or implied needs'. This rather complex definition can be simplified down to the idea of 'fitness for purpose' and therefore TQM is associated with the establishment of standards for a product or service according to the needs of customers; setting up procedures for ensuring those standards are met, monitoring actual quality and taking action when standards fall below those required. This represents a major difference from the traditional approach to quality as it emphasises continuous improvement and the need for ensuring quality throughout the organisation, not just the production process. As Holmes put it: "if a company wishes to ensure that it reliably meets its customers' requirements, all parts of the company must be involved in quality". Thus in Holmes' view, TQM is more of a management technique or cultural issue rather than just a production matter.
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STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

(2) Edward Lazear, Personnel Economics for Managers. New York: Wiley, 1998. Lazear is an innovative labor economist who has creatively used rigorous economic analyses to illuminate HR topics. His book, along with Baron/Kreps, provides an interesting and rigorous way of framing many HR issues. His approach often provides useful but nonintuitive ways of understanding alternative approaches to a problem. (3) Robert S. Kaplan and David P. Norton, The Balanced Scorecard. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1996. This book outlines the steps necessary to think through the measurements that will drive the execution of strategy. Although not specifically oriented toward HR, the logic for deriving relevant HR measures is similar, and provides a new way for thinking about HR metrics.
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STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AT HERMAN MILLER

STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AT HERMAN MILLER

Key emphases of HMI's HR management infrastructure include (1) employee competency identification and development, (2) building employee participation, (3) building business literacy, (4[r]

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Models of Strategic Human Resource Management

Models of Strategic Human Resource Management

Theoretical Frameworks in Strategic HRM Research While the previous discussion highlights different modes of theorizing researchers have emphasized in the study of the HRM – firm performance relationship, Figure 3.1 reflects a review by Wright and colleagues of various theories that have been used to provide greater insights into the different theories and their focus and assumptions of how HRM systems operate. Because there have been numerous reviews of the traditional theories that are available to strategic HRM scholars (e.g., McMahan et al., 1999; Jackson and Schuler, 1995; Schuler and Jackson, 2005), in this section we will only be covering two of the more established or at least most widely used theories that have been highly influential in this field of research: 1) the resource-based view of the firm that equips strategic HRM research with a strategic orientation; and 2) the behavioral perspective which offers a more psychological insight to understanding the impact of HRM on firm performance. These perspectives have also been categorized under strategic theories (Wright and McMahan, 1992) or proactive theories of strategic HRM (McMahan et al., 1999) which we believe are better aligned with the raison d'être for this line of research (Becker and Huselid, 1998). A detailed description of other theories of strategic HRM can be found in Schuler and Jackson (2005), Wright and McMahan (1992) and McMahan et al. (1999).
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Strategic Human Resource Management and Corporate Performance

Strategic Human Resource Management and Corporate Performance

We believe that companies will pay a certain costs when hiring employees. Be- sides, we also need to spend some expenditure on training, education, health care and other related investment items in order to make employees give better service to our company. This part of expense together with recruitment cost forms the total cost of company’s spending on employees. Employees in differ- ent positions will produce different values. A part of the values will feed back to employees themselves, while the rest of the values will return to our company. It is worth mention that the part of values returning to company should be greater than the total cost of company’s paying for employees to ensure the input-output regulations, which is shown in Figure 2.
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The Strategic Human Resource Management Dimension

The Strategic Human Resource Management Dimension

For management, governing of the implicit coordination is a tricky task as implicit coordination components ⎯ anticipation and dynamic adjustment ⎯ are deeply rooted in individual psychological reciprocal reactions. However, there are other features of the task and the context within which work teams operate that might be more interesting for SHRM researchers since they represent various mechanisms that could be employed by management to ensure the positive aggregation from micro to macro. Specifically, Rico et al. (2008) examined the potential moderating roles of (1) task routineness: the extent to which highly routine tasks are well-defined, highly structured and encompassing predictable situations that can be resolved using standardized procedures; (2) task interdependence: the interconnections among the tasks of team members; and (3) virtuality in the relationship: the extent to which team members rely on virtual tools to coordinate and execute team processes, the amount of information value provided by such tools, and the synchronicity of team members’ interactions. These three features are the job characteristics of the team – the outcomes of the team-based job design.
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Human Resource Management and the Strategic Risk Relationship

Human Resource Management and the Strategic Risk Relationship

Despite limitations, the study trail-blazes on areas that are essential in the present business climate by providing a deeper understanding on how the organization can possibly leverage on human capital as a crucial source of corporate competitive advantage. This is the main aim of strategic human resource management. This goal—as far as the HR function is concerned—can be achieved by formulating policies and programs that result into better perceived organizational support which in turn would hopefully lead not just to higher organizational commitment but more importantly better employee engagement. As one puts it, "The challenge today is not just retaining talented people, but fully engaging them, capturing their minds and hearts at each stage of their working lives” (Kaye & Jordan-Evans, 2003 as cited in Lockwood, 2007, p. 2).
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STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AT QUANTUM

STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AT QUANTUM

Key emphases of Quantum's HR management infrastructure include : (1) establishment and communication of the firm's mission, vision, and values ; (2) team-based product development and op[r]

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Strategic Human Resource Management

Strategic Human Resource Management

Your case may be based on interviews with key players in the organization, "grey literature 2 " pertaining to the organization, published academic or trade literature, and/or popular media items. Groups shall submit to the instructor no later than January 28 a one-page (maximum) proposal describing the organization, focus of study, and methodology. Proposals will not be marked, but will be returned with feedback.

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Strategic Human Resource Management

Strategic Human Resource Management

C. 1. talent management, 2. Systematic, 3. Value, retain, develop, 4. Job share, 5. Job analysis, 6. Observation, incident, questionnaires, 7. verbs, 8. Five-fold network, seven-point plan, 9. Competency framework, 10. core, 11. Employer brand, 12. Questions, bold, controversial, 13. Color, graphics, 14. diversity, 15. Targeted recruitment, 16. Job description, person specification, competency framework, 17. objectivity, 18. Telephonic interviewing, 19. Contrast effect, 20. Equal opportunity, questioning, 21. structured, 22. listening, 23. Situational, behavioral, 24. Right to privacy, human rights, 25. Objective evaluation
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2 Strategic Human Resource Management

2 Strategic Human Resource Management

The fundamental aim of strategic HRM is to generate organizational capability by ensuring that the organization has the skilled, engaged, committed and well-motivated employees it needs to achieve sustained competitive advantage. It has two main objectives: fi rst to achieve integration – the vertical alignment of HR strategies with business strategies and the horizon- tal integration of HR strategies. The second objective is to provide a sense of direction in an often turbulent environment so that the business needs of the organization and the individual and collective needs of its employees can be met by the development and implementation of coherent and practical HR policies and programmes. In accordance with the resource-based view, the strategic goal will be to ‘create fi rms which are more intelligent and fl exible than their competitors’ (Boxall, 1996) by hiring and developing more talented staff and by extending their skills base.
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Review on Strategic Human Resource Management in Construction Companies

Review on Strategic Human Resource Management in Construction Companies

Human resource management difficulty is very common for construction industry competitor in all over the world. Shortage of labors, a skilled technician, high turnover rate, layoff or skilled technicians is those ordinary problem faced by the construction industry main competitor. For occurrence, most of the contractor found it is rigid to recruit the skillful technical workers. Most of the consultant firm find it is hard to employ a design engineer and most of the developer’s firm find it is hard to employ an experienced project manager. All these human resource management problems are very influential to project success, as getting the right people for the right job is very essential in the construction project. Therefore, this paper is conducted to study the role of Human Resource Management (HRM) towards project success. The three main areas were being studied in this research (1) The important activities of SHRM in construction project success (2) The major SHRM challenges (3) The critical success factor of SHRM.
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Strategic Human Resource Management: A Choice or. Compulsion?

Strategic Human Resource Management: A Choice or. Compulsion?

Most of the literature that focuses on strategy content does so with a good understanding of external context (e.g. Porter’s generic strategies) but much of this kind of work fails to address internal context and process issues. One of the major problems with Porter’s generic strategies for example is that the recommendations do not adequately address how such strategies should be implemented given certain organizational variables and procedures. It is increasingly being recognized that a detailed knowledge of what should be done is simply not enough for strategic success, and that, unless strategists consider how actions are to be carried out, difficulties may arise when it is too late. Kiechel (1984) was among the authors who launched attacks on “strategic planners who zealously promote unrealistic strategies at the expense of common-sense management”. Similarly, Argyris (1989) and Kemball (1972) have outlined the need for an approach which is considerably more practical than the conventional content-oriented approaches. The need to incorporate these considerations further identifies HRM as an integral part of the development of strategy in that the respective activities of individuals and groups need to be a central part of the planning process both before that activity has begun, and while it is underway. Linking of HRM with strategy and putting particular emphasis on the facilitation of a more “process centred agenda” in relation to strategic goals through the integration of the HRM function is one of the aim of this paper.
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Strategic human resource management in a health system

Strategic human resource management in a health system

Strategy defines the direction the organisation intends to move and establishes the mode of action for the achievement of goals (Anthony, Perrewe & Kacmar 1999). Strategy then reflects the organisation’s approach to achieving its objectives, building on strengths and minimising weaknesses. Research identifies six common barriers to strategy implementation namely inadequate management development, unclear or conflicting strategic priorities, and difficulties in how the top team works together, a top-down management style, poor inter-functional and divisional co-ordination and poor vertical communication. These barriers appeared to exist, ‘… in almost all organizational units’ (Beer & Eisenstat 1999, p.15).
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An Analysis of Strategic Human Resource Management in Iran

An Analysis of Strategic Human Resource Management in Iran

The field of strategic human resources management (SHRM) has enjoyed a remarkable ascendancy during the past two decades, academically and practically. The parallel growth in both the research literature and interest among practicing managers is a notable departure from more common experience, where managers are either unaware or simply uninterested in scholarly developments in this field. As the field of HR strategy begins to mature, it is time to take stock of where it stands as both a field of inquiry and management practice. Although drawing on nearly two decades of solid academic progress, this exercise is explicitly prospective. In the study of global practices that illustrates the organizations which could achieve competitive advantages and greater market share (such as: Wells Fargo Bank, Connel, 2008), it is reasonable to emphasize the role of SHRM system as solutions to business problems. However why do Iranian managers look at SHRM as mere accessory tool and not a fundamental instrument to become more competitive, has yet to be investigated? This paper investigates the current situation in the implementation of SHRM in Iran. In this way the study reviews the national culture of Iran in the first step as an effective factor in implementing SHRM. It elaborates the effect of national culture in the managerial style of organization and the necessary elements for the managers to implement SHRM in their organizations. In this way, the study recommends the enhanced model of European foundation of quality management to the Iranian organization for the systematic implementation of SHRM. In this model the cultural factor has been considered, as the management style in Iran is very much influenced by this factor.
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The role of strategic groups in understanding strategic human resource management

The role of strategic groups in understanding strategic human resource management

locations across the world influenced their management of human resources in specific ways. The four companies were very proud of their international management cohort and the practices used to manage them, though they admitted that their recent corporate expansion plans made the supply of managerial human resources more challenging. Specific HRM practices had been enacted within the Prestige Operators to alleviate such issues and to ensure that strategic objectives related to growth and the maintenance of standards were achieved. They recruited almost exclusively into their management development programmes or directly to junior management positions from European hotel schools. In addition, they all ran management development programmes designed to advance the progress of talented managers from their existing staff to HGM positions within eight to ten years. These development programmes identified junior staff via performance appraisal systems and senior unit management reviews. They then attended assessment centres run by corporate and regional HR and operational specialists. Two members of this group had formal management training programmes where diploma and degree graduates joined and were provided with insights into key hotel departments. The other two organisations did not have such schemes but recruited the same calibre of graduates to junior management positions, though these recruits attended specific training courses and were tracked through regional and corporate HR systems.
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Strategic Human Resource Management as Ethical Stewardship

Strategic Human Resource Management as Ethical Stewardship

Abstract: The research about strategic human resource management (SHRM) has suggested that human resource professionals (HRPs) have the opportunity to play a greater role in contributing to organizational success if they are effective in developing systems and policies aligned with the organization's values, goals, and mission. We suggest that HRPs need to raise the standard of their performance and that the competitive demands of the modern economic environment create implicit ethical duties that HRPs owe to their organizations. We define ethical stewardship as a model of governance that honors obligations due to the many stakeholders and that maximizes long-term organizational wealth creation. We propose that if HRPs adopt an ethical stewardship framework and the qualities of transformative leaders, they will be more aware of their ethical duties to their organizations and more effective in helping their organizations to create increased wealth, achieve desired organizational outcomes, and establish work environments that are more satisfying to employees. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
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Chapter 1 Strategic human resource management

Chapter 1 Strategic human resource management

Demographic forces knowledge workers-members of occupations generating, processing analysing or synthesizing ideas and information like scientist and management consultants. Knowledge workers are the fastest growing type of workers in Canada. Demographics forces(educational attainment)-is the highest educational level attained by an individual worker employee group or population.

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Strategic Human Resource Management. Module Syllabus

Strategic Human Resource Management. Module Syllabus

The Strategic Human Resource Management module provides students with a critical understanding of the theories, principles, historical trends, current issues and practices relevant to human resource management strategy in organisations. This will support the development of subject specific and key transferable skills necessary for employment in roles which require the effective management of both human and knowledge capital within the organisation, therefore extending beyond purely human resource management roles. By exploring the shifting of roles from process manager or administrator to strategic business advisor and partner, students will understand the unique strategic positioning of contemporary human resource management and the subsequent demands placed on professionals working in this area. The module will serve as an intellectual platform to proceed to further modules of study.
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THE IMPACT OF STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ON ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE

THE IMPACT OF STRATEGIC HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ON ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE

What is important to recognize is why success through human resources can be sustained and cannot readily be imitated by competitors. The reason is that the success that comes from managing people effectively is often not as visible or transparent as to its source. Culture, how people are managed, and the effects of this on their behavior and skills are sometimes seen as the "soft" side of business, occasionally dismissed.[7] Even when they are not dismissed, it is often hard to comprehend the dynamics of a particular company and how it operates because the way people are managed often fits together in a system. It is easy to copy one thing but much more difficult to copy numerous things.
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