Top PDF Students' Perceptions of International Agriculture After an International Agricultural Experience

Students' Perceptions of International Agriculture After an International Agricultural Experience

Students' Perceptions of International Agriculture After an International Agricultural Experience

CHAPTER IV SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS In order to study studentsperceptions of international agriculture after an international agricultural experience, this study was divided into a qualitative and a quantitative section. The qualitative section was an in-depth phenomenon study of students who participated in the Cultivating Global Leaders in Agriculture: Enhancing Participation in Undergraduate Experiential Learning Opportunities for Minorities internship. The qualitative study consisted of two sets of focus groups, a pre-internship focus group administered six weeks before the internship and a post-trip focus group administered the first week of the fall semester, to gauge the students’ expectations and perceptions of international agriculture. Focus group questions were adapted from Zhai’s 2000 study. Data were analyzed using Glaser and Strauss’ (1967; as cited by Merriam, 2009) constant comparative method; and trustworthiness was ensured by member checking, audit trails, and peer debriefing. The quantitative study surveyed students who had participated in a study abroad trip within the College of Agriculture and Life
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Effects of an Introductory Agricultural Education Course on Agricultural Literacy and Perceptions of Agriculture in Urban Students

Effects of an Introductory Agricultural Education Course on Agricultural Literacy and Perceptions of Agriculture in Urban Students

Teachers must also make students aware that the stereotypical farmer is not the reality of today. The perception that agriculture rests totally in the hands of farmers is history. Agricultural careers, including farming, are extremely technologically advanced and there are even greater numbers of jobs that involve agriculture but have no direct contact with growing or producing any food or fiber commodities. These future members of the workforce should see that the negative stereotypes of agricultural jobs should no longer exist as the agricultural industry has long ago taken on new components to its livelihood. Both the traditional agricultural careers and the emerging new agricultural areas need highly trained, well-educated young people entering those career fields. Without a future generation of agricultural workers, there will be no one to sustain the lives of the people or the environment.
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Counselor Educators Perceptions of and Experiences with International Students

Counselor Educators Perceptions of and Experiences with International Students

Some limitations need to be noted when interpreting and generalizing the findings of this study. Firstly, despite the fact that all regions in the U.S. were represented in the sample, the response rate was low and procedurally unable to be assessed for potential reliability. The low rate might have been because the sur- vey was conducted during the summer months in the U.S. where many counselor educators might have been unavailable to respond. The small sample size affected some statistical analyses where the cell-sizes went below 20. This was particu- larly pertinent in regard to some participants not having had training contact with international students from Western countries. And, some participants had only limited experience training international students who were either successful or not successful academically because the number of international students per pro- gram is usually small. Secondly, participants were limited to CACREP-accredited programs in the U.S. Generalization of findings to non-CACREP programs in and outside of the U.S. can only be done with caution.
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The Impact of an International Interprofessional Experience on Perceptions of Pharmacist-Physician Relationships

The Impact of an International Interprofessional Experience on Perceptions of Pharmacist-Physician Relationships

Our programs intend to continuing offering this learning experience to both medical and pharmacy students on a yearly basis as part of formal week-long courses at both schools. We would encourage other schools to explore offering similar international interprofessional experiences and disseminating their experiences through scholarship. Coordination of the team and delineation of roles before the trip was of importance. Living, eating, and working together as a team for a week naturally leads students to learn about, from, and with each other. We would like to expand our data to include a larger sample size in the future. We would also like to include additional disciplines in the trip such as nursing, social work and occupational therapy. Additional research is needed to determine how this type of
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Maximizing the Experience of International Graduate Students: A Case-Study

Maximizing the Experience of International Graduate Students: A Case-Study

professional development in higher education. The second phase occurred at the end of the university-wide orientation programs in mid-September of 2016. All international graduate students who attended the different orientation programs along with the welcome back week activities were invited to take part of another web-based survey which took about seven to nine minutes to complete. The survey and interview questions covered both Likert-type scale and open-ended questions ranging from demographic and general information, life in the United States, prior cultural experiences, cultural adaption, acculturative stress and other pertinent variables. The survey measured their perceptions of acculturation in the United States. The third phase occurred two weeks after the university-wide orientation programs. A total of eleven random international graduate students who successfully completed the campus-wide orientation programs were invited to take part in a semi-structured focus group interview for about one hour. Observations were used for the sole purpose of research study and were not used for evaluation purposes. To ensure confidentiality and privacy of our participants, respondents remained anonymous and were given a coded number during the focus group interview. Participants were free to withdraw from the focus group interview at any time. The data collection approach resulted in a comprehensive voice recording of the communication and offered the researcher access to the archived conversations.
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International Students’ Satisfaction with the Services of Agriculture Bank of China

International Students’ Satisfaction with the Services of Agriculture Bank of China

In a viable financial institution where businesses compete for customers, cus- tomer satisfaction is seen as a key differentiator (Rubogora, 2017) and increa- singly become a key commodity in decision making (Fornell, Rust, & Dekimpe, 2010; Hui, Wan, & Ho, 2007; Hume & Mort, 2008). Institutions have to bring forth innovative ideas to beat competitions as well as increasing the needs of customers (Cavusgil et al., 2003). The degree to which the customer is happy depends on the numerous services they received. Prior studies suggest that cus- tomer involvement seems to be closely related to satisfaction, (Dellande, Gilly, & Graham, 2004; Grissemann & Stokburger-Sauer, 2012) and/or influences cus- tomers’ perceptions of a service experience (Edvardsson, 2005). According to (Franke, Keinz, & Steger, 2009), customers with high product connection, par- ticipate more in a continuity of that particular products. Therefore, customer sa- tisfaction is the probable element which banks use to gain a tactical advantage over other financial institutions. Customer satisfaction is the groundwork for any institute to keep its existing customers (Khan, 2012). Banks make policies to maintain their old customers because the cost involves in getting new ones are high. Besides loyal customers are reluctant to risk their relationship with an in- stitution, which is a reason for customers not complain; (Mittal, Huppertz, & Khare, 2008). Customers react differently to what they anticipate and what they receive, regarding the fulfillment of needs, goals and/or desires from the envi- ronment (Deci et al., 2001). Existing literature shows that customers share their experience with their colleagues and spread the information quickly when they have had a bad experience with a financial institution (Nimako & Mensah, 2014). Banks are aware of the essence in improving both products and services of customers which leads to satisfaction. As the service qualities exceed custom- er’s prior expectations, it’s easily influence them, (Bus et al., 2018). According to (Hansemark & Albinson, 2004), “what customers expect from their service pro- viders is their satisfaction; as services cannot be separated from its provider, (Rubogora, 2017) as a result, banks that fail to build the strong bond with it cus- tomers loose on customer loyalty (McEwen, 2005). The going concern of a bank has small worth without the existence of the customer. International students in the People’s Republic of China have a wide range of banks selecting choice. So the bank main duty is not to win customers but to retain them through effective customer service.
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Welcome to America?: The Perceptions of Discrimination Experienced by International Students

Welcome to America?: The Perceptions of Discrimination Experienced by International Students

Abby describes her educational experience as fairly good, even though there have been a few instances where she feels that she was discriminated against. A majority of the teachers that she has had have been very supportive in helping her complete her degree. She feels, however, that there are a few who are not supportive, and did not treat her equally with other students. She mentions one in particular, who seemed to favor the other students in the class, spending more time explaining concepts, and answering their questions. This teacher would routinely ignore Abby when she would attempt to ask a question. She feels that since she is a Muslim, her religion makes the teacher see her differently. She observes that in her ESL class, the Vietnamese and Spanish students are always talking with each other, and laughing with each other, and although she shares in their discussions and jokes, the teacher still seems to treat the other students better. Abby tells me that there were only a few teachers that exhibited this type of behavior. When I asked her if this was one of the teachers in her business or computer classes, she said that her teachers in business and computers classes were good, and that the teacher she had an issue with was one of her ESL teachers.
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International undergraduate business students' perceptions of employability

International undergraduate business students' perceptions of employability

The key findings are: (1) Participants were unable to differentiate between employability skills, personality traits and job-specific skills; (2) The importance of social skills and networking were recognised by Chinese respondents, in particular; (3) The perceived level of work-readiness was higher among respondents who had previous work experience; (4) The inclusion of more practical WIL components in the degree program calls for curriculum review; (5) Creating opportunities for students to apply their knowledge and skills in professional contexts is highly desirable. The findings highlight curriculum considerations needed in the development of high-quality WIL experiences that will enable students to apply the knowledge and skills learnt in the classroom, thus enhancing their self-efficacy about their employability.
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An Assessment of Students Perceptions Toward Factors Influencing Supervised Agricultural Experience Participation

An Assessment of Students Perceptions Toward Factors Influencing Supervised Agricultural Experience Participation

5. Describe student level of agreement with factors influencing SAE participation. Methods and Procedures To determine the factors students perceived as influential to their participation in SAEs, a study of enrolled agricultural students in 120 secondary agricultural education programs, 30 per state, one state per National FFA region, was conducted. This study was descriptive in nature, in that it attempted “to describe a given state of affairs as fully and carefully as possible” (Frankel & Wallen, 2009, p. 390) and utilized a questionnaire as the method of data collection. One state per National FFA region was purposively chosen based on similar size and structure within the state FFA divisions (districts/areas/regions), for a total of four states. Frankel and Wallen (2009) stated that investigators can use personal judgment to select a sample based on previous knowledge of a population and the specific purpose of the research. Each division per state chosen included an urban city center with agricultural education programs and outlying rural/suburban agricultural education programs based on the U.S. Census. Thirty programs were randomly selected from each state’s purposively chosen division for participation in the study, with a total of 120 agricultural programs contacted. Teachers were asked to administer the questionnaire to students who had completed at least one year of agricultural education instruction registered in their class with the largest enrollment. It is noted that a limitation
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Transmission of Traditional Agricultural Knowledge: Intergenerational or International? Examining Youth’s Involvement in Agriculture

Transmission of Traditional Agricultural Knowledge: Intergenerational or International? Examining Youth’s Involvement in Agriculture

Children’s meaningful involvement and contribution to household livelihoods is a precondition not only to successful transmission of traditional knowledge, but of overall self- worth. Children in Jadrangal are involved in agriculture by default; they experience the home life their parents have provided. Commonly, boys and girls do small amounts of light work, imitating what their parents, older siblings, or neighbors are doing, such as retrieving firewood, watering crops, or sorting seeds (JadrangalPanchayat, Field Observations, April- May 2013). Time spent around farm activity is generally a form of play. The young sons and daughters of a neighborhood in Manaal were observed chasing baby goats, retrieving items for older members of the community, and hanging around the elders in the polyhouse, who harvested French beans. Adults generally allowed them to “help” as they wished. Two farmers with young children stated that they do small amounts of work because it is enjoyable for them (Kumari, Raj, Farmer and wife, Personal Interview #19; Chand, Pavla Devi, Farmer, Personal Interview #14). One farmer mother of a ten-year-old son and twelve- year-old daughter said that her children are involved with farm work when they have time and do it for enjoyment, like “many other children of their age,” (Chand, Pavla Devi, Farmer, Personal Interview #14). Overall, gendered division of involvement on the family farm was not observed for this age group.
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LUIZ DE QUEIROZ COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE: A BOOKLET FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AND RESEARCHERS

LUIZ DE QUEIROZ COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE: A BOOKLET FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AND RESEARCHERS

Buy your ticket to Piracicaba and check the boarding platform number on your ticket, which is located on the ground floor (it takes 1 hour of traveling from Campinas to Piracic[r]

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International Institute of Tropical Agriculture

International Institute of Tropical Agriculture

2. Materials and Method 2.1 Team Composition The survey team comprised of researchers from IITA (Uganda) and ISAR Rubona Station who have been researching on these varieties over years. In addition was C3P Country Coordinator for Rwanda in the team. Also extension staff from partners visited were brought on board to guide the team within their areas of jurisdiction especially from the NGOs. The ministry of Agriculture was represented by National Seed Services (SNS) person. All the survey was done as one team.

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Agriculture at a crossroads: 

Perceptions of Irish Agricultural 

Sustainability

Agriculture at a crossroads: Perceptions of Irish Agricultural Sustainability

Carolan however points out how “today comparative advantage can be produced by using such things as direct payments, export subsidies and tariffs” (2012: 16). However, in the face of the value of Irish agricultural exports to GDP the economic growth model is proving a strong argument to counter environmental concerns where in 2015 “the value of exports to Asia jumped 45 per cent to reach €850 million. There were also increases in exports to North America (€740 million, +18 per cent), the Middle East (€330 million, +11 per cent) and Africa (€610 million, +9 per cent)” (Burke-Kennedy, 2015: no pagination). Although the economic benefits of increased agricultural production in the Irish context are noteworthy Sweeney in describing the impact of agriculture on global climate change points to the implications of Irish agricultural expansion describing how “in areas such as Ireland significant changes in climate will be observed” (2008: 4).
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Chinese international students' experience of studying online in New Zealand.

Chinese international students' experience of studying online in New Zealand.

Participants also acknowledged the flexibility and independence of the online learning environment, and stressed that effort is needed because there is limited supervision in this learning environment. However, two participants disagreed and explained that this cultural impact cannot be generalised. This perception may be in line with work by Samovar and Porter (2004) suggesting that such students are simply less aware of the influence of their own culture. In particular, this study’s participants argued that concepts of hard work differ between individuals no matter which culture we come from, and what it means to be a hard worker can also be interpreted differently. They argued that some Chinese students were more willing to adapt to a new culture and learning environment than others.
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Educational, sociocultural and employment experience of Chinese international students in the UK

Educational, sociocultural and employment experience of Chinese international students in the UK

A study carried out by Bamber (2014) on female Chinese Accounting and Finance masters‘ students‘ motivation to study in the UK used both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. He carried out 12 semi-structured interviews (including with eight Chinese women), with a follow-up focus group discussion including six focus groups with between 4 and 7 participants per group (three of whom were exclusively female mainland Chinese students). He then undertook 132 surveys, including 87 from female Chinese students, 13 from male Chinese students and 32 from other areas of Asia. Although Bamber‘s study has affirmed the US is the first choice destination for Chinese students, two factors deterred the research respondents from going to the US: safety and costs. Parents of female Chinese students are concerned about safety issues, in particular gun safety, and the UK is believed to be safer than the US. Tuition fees and living costs in the UK are considered lower, helped by lower exchange rates. The second choice destination for female Chinese students, reported by Bamber (2014), is Australia. The preference for studying in Australia is due to two factors. The first is that Australia is a more diverse country and more welcoming to Asians than the UK. The second factor is the geographical proximity from Australia to China shortens the travel distance (e.g. Kemp & Madden, 1998; Li & Bray, 2007 [Mainlanders to Hong Kong]; Moogan et al., 1999). The current study suggests the primary motivations for coming to the UK as early and mid-career progression, only 1 year for a master‘s programme, reasonable exchange rates and the convenience of travelling around the EU. The opportunity to travel in the UK and in Europe has been found as the most important non-academic motivator for Chinese students to choose the UK.
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Stigma, tensions, and apprehension: The academic writing experience of international students

Stigma, tensions, and apprehension: The academic writing experience of international students

In Positioning theory, Harré and van Lagenhove (1999) argue that the way people position themselves in human interaction, such as in conversations, in teaching and learning, in discussions and in non-verbal encounters frames the outcomes and products of those interactions. For example, a teacher who positions him/herself as authoritarian in relation to students and is seen as such by them, engenders submissive reactions from students which tend to include: student ’ s attention, copious note taking, discipline and excessive orderliness which a less authoritarian teacher cannot obtain from the same students. If on the other hand, students position themselves as deviant and hard to control, they create a different type of classroom dynamic in which the work of teachers can become difficult to manage. Harre ’ and Langenhove suggest that positioning is a more dynamic term to use than role as it defines a dyadic relationship between two people or groups of people. Students can position themselves in their relationship with their teachers. Equally, teachers can also position their students. Therefore, it is perfectly possible for teachers to see their students as competent or incompetent and for students also to view themselves in the same terms. Such positioning can have significant impact on students ’ attitudes to their subjects of study, to the teacher and to the way they are taught, which in turn could have a bearing on study outcomes. Therefore, in this study, we were interested to understand how international students position themselves in conversations and debates surrounding their academic writing and how they position their teachers in the same context too. Harre ’ and Langenhove argue that the positions can be tried out, abandoned, or adopted depending on the outcomes they generate. It was therefore important in this project to examine the extent to which the positions students took about the issue of academic writing were temporary, permanent, or shifting
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The Journey and Experience of International Students: an Insight From a UK University

The Journey and Experience of International Students: an Insight From a UK University

aware of it before coming to the UK and the respondents suggested that UWS should announce such services as this might affect the international students’ decision of se- lecting the university. Then ‘advice on how to arrive safe- ly at the accommodation, and any ‘meet and greet’ ser- vices made available by UWS’ being the third statement in students who strongly agree, agree and somewhat agree with 36.7%. Our respondents consider that statement to be essential because they are not only new to the university but most of them are also new to the country. Additional- ly, most respondents who participated in this survey are undergraduate students which means they came straight from high school, and the academic experience is differ- ent from that of the host institution. The fourth statement is ‘details of the registration and enrolment process and the documents that entrants will need’ with 36.6%. Our respondents suggested that more information on this item should be sent to the international students before leaving their home country. The fifth statement on this question is ‘what to expect, upon arrival, from immigration con- trol, including what documents are needed, and when and where students will need them’ according to students who participated to the survey with 34.8%. Our results are in line with the prior study of Bartram (2008) [4] who
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INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS' PERCEIVED UNIVERSITY SCHOOLING EXPERIENCE IN THE FACE OF INTERNATIONALIZATION

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS' PERCEIVED UNIVERSITY SCHOOLING EXPERIENCE IN THE FACE OF INTERNATIONALIZATION

The third domain of study abroad motivation relates specifically to economic globalization and is known as, push-pull factors (Chen, 2008, p. 11). Push factors refer to elements of a home country that motivate students to leave that country, and pull factors are perceived positive qualities of a host country that encourage students to mobilize to that country (Eder, Smith & Pitts, 2010). A common push factor for Chinese students is the highly competitive nature of being accepted to a tier 1 Chinese university. China’s continued economic growth has resulted in both “aspiration for higher education and the demand for graduates” (Li & Bray, 2007, p. 796); however, its postsecondary expansions fall short in meeting such demand (Li & Bray, 2007). On the other hand, a pull factor may include any type of positive characteristics such as, the host country’s physical geography, or the host institution’s academic reputation, as well as, perceived future employment opportunities. An example of a pull factor is the view that studying abroad gives students an employment advantage when returning to their home country. For instance, in the news release titled, Ontario Tops Country in International Students, an international student from Denmark explained “having a Canadian university on your resume is highly regarded by employers, and can lead to more job opportunities” (Callan, 2012, para. 1). Additionally, undergraduate students from China, Hong Kong, Korea, and Taiwan reported they were influenced by Canada’s general characteristics such as
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International Students

International Students

The Culinary Institute of America is a private, not-for-profit college dedicated to providing the world’s best professional culinary education. Excellence, leadership, professionalism, ethics, and respect for diversity are the core values that guide our efforts. We teach our students the general knowledge and specific skills necessary to live successful lives and to grow into positions of influence and leadership in their chosen profession.

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for International Students

for International Students

2. Applicants from these countries should submit their official certificates with an authentication attachment (e.g., Certificate of Authentication or Certificate of Overseas Educational Institutions) issued by the Korean Embassy or Consulate. N.B. All documents must be in English. Otherwise, you must submit a notarized/certified English translation completed by a notary public in the country in which the document was originally produced. C. Admitted Chinese students

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