Top PDF Students' perceptions of e-learning in the Department of Information Science at the University of South Africa

Students' perceptions of e-learning in the Department of Information Science at the University of South Africa

Students' perceptions of e-learning in the Department of Information Science at the University of South Africa

wireless internet access is still not accessible in all corners of South Africa. It is a common fact that not all households can afford the internet, especially in African countries. The Internet World Stats (2012) reveal the overall internet usage in Africa is 7% and this is a very low percentage compared to the first world countries. Walker (2007) emphasizes the richness of the World Wide Web and the internet as a great benefit for students and any other user in providing required services. Internet connectivity infrastructure for ICT development includes the following: intranet (LAN networks) and extranet (WAN), which is considered one of the biggest challenges in the implementation of e-learning in higher education institutions, particularly in developing countries (Fares 2007). Therefore, the e-learning environment must provide students and lecturers with a high degree of reliability and accessibility (Salmon 2004). Technological obstacles in an e-learning environment often occur in bandwidth capacity. Kunaefi (2006) reveals that the higher education institutions need to provide wireless and wired networks with high connectivity “bandwidth” to avoid universities’ e-learning initiatives being adversely affected. Furthermore, institutions should invest in the right ICT infrastructure that allows students and lecturers to easily access the ICT hardware, providing user friendly software and fixed technical support (Al-adwn & Smedlley 2012). It is well known that the connectivity market in Africa is still in its early stages of development; it is also one of the fastest-growing markets in the world. It is a common fact that connectivity affects almost all universities in developing countries. Only when the issue of bandwidth is resolved can we declare that we are information access oriented.
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Informetrics Education in Library and Information Science (LIS) Academic Department in South Africa

Informetrics Education in Library and Information Science (LIS) Academic Department in South Africa

The majority of LIS institutions in SA operate contact learning mode other than the distance learning that the University of South Africa (UNISA) offers. Ocholla and Bothma (2007) recognise two learning modes for librarianship in SA, the undergraduate mode and the postgraduate mode. The undergraduate mode dominates the postgraduate, and has three or four years’ qualification programmes. However, some institutions like the University of Zululand (UNIZULU), University of South Africa, University of Limpopo (UL) and University of Western Cape (UWC) offer not only undergraduate programmes, but also postgraduate Diploma in Library and Information Science programmes (PGDLIS) (Hlongwane, 2014). We note that some of these qualification programmes are not currently active, suggesting that they may be shut down in future as students increasingly prefer masters qualifications offered with course work (e.g. at University of Cape Town and University of KwaZulu-Natal) than PGDLIS. Each undergraduate programme is made up of a variety of topics/themes from the broad field of LIS, with a number of compulsory and/or elective courses from other disciplines. In the postgraduate mode, students are expected to obtain any general degree to be admitted to a postgraduate diploma in library and information science or two-year masters qualification. Luo (2017) suggests that the diversified approach can be useful and widely adopted, as it is an attempt to continuously expand the parameters of the LIS field by making research methods more relevant within all LIS programmes. While informetrics education is important, there does not seem to be sufficient knowledge of such education in South African LIS Schools.
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Students’ perceptions of writing : evidence from undergraduate economics in South Africa

Students’ perceptions of writing : evidence from undergraduate economics in South Africa

Page 3 of 12 2. Conceptual Framework 2.1. The Writing Skills System A university department at a large residential university in the Gauteng province has instituted a system to encourage students to write the essay in small and regular intervals throughout the first semester of the year. The essay forms part of the curriculum of a formal subject and counts 10% and 20% of the semester mark for this subject for second and third year students respectively. Students are required to attend writing lectures once a week, for 12 academic weeks, where different aspects of writing in economics are addressed. The lecture is about 40 minutes long and takes place in the afternoon in a lecture venue or a computer laboratory, depending on the objective of the lecture and theme for the week. There is a writing tutor available to consult with students, individually or in a group, for up to 25 hours per week. The writing tutor is typically a postgraduate student, who has extensive writing experience. There were four motivational talks held to discuss aspects around competition entry, writing and general economics discourse.
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The use of Web 2.0 technologies by Library and Information Science students at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa

The use of Web 2.0 technologies by Library and Information Science students at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa

The Department of Library and Information Science, UWC, like its parent institution is alert to its African and international context as it strives to be a place of quality, a place to grow from hope to agency through knowledge. Its mission is to contribute significantly towards the development of an information literate South African society. In order to redress the inequalities, the Department lays great emphasis on helping individuals from the educationally and economically disadvantaged communities to acquire professional education and training in LIS. UWC’s LIS department aims to help conserve and explore the environmental and cultural resources of the Southern African region, and to encourage a wide awareness of them in the community by making its graduates and diplomats not only literate in the printed and electronic sources of information but also in the vast wealth of information in the oral traditions (University of the Western Cape 2013). UWC’s LIS department offers a four year Bachelor of Library and Information Studies (BLIS) degree, Master’s (MLIS), PhD and a Postgraduate Diploma in Library and Information Studies (PGDipLIS). UWC’s new structured MLIS is designed for LIS professionals who wish to advance their careers and/or broaden their horizons beyond their library walls. It comprises four modules and a mini-dissertation. The new MLIS curriculum has been tailor made to meet the demands of the market with particular emphasis on Information and Communication Technology (ICTs) and knowledge management. UWC has a niche in public librarianship and school librarianship although it also educates academic librarians (University of the Western Cape, Department of Library and Information Science 2015).
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The Role of University of South Africa in Contributing to Open Distance and  E-Learning and to Social Justice in South Africa

The Role of University of South Africa in Contributing to Open Distance and E-Learning and to Social Justice in South Africa

5. About myUnisa As indicated above, the University of South Africa has adopted a number of technologies to facilitate learning; the available technologies are not adopted uniformly throughout the various colleges and academic departments including ABET. Cant and Bothma (2010:56) argue that, even though Unisa may officially endorse a particular learning technology, it is ultimately the lecturers within a department who determine the extent and effectiveness of the use of that particular technology and their respective views on these various technologies may differ. According to Cant and Bothma (2010:56), there may be some lecturers who are technologically challenged and who either shy away from or limit their use of technology solutions in their teaching activities. Other lecturers, however, might be more comfortable with certain technologies than with others, and this could result in the desperate use of technology to support learning. In addition, some of the more techno-literate lecturers may adopt one or more technologies not directly supported by the institution such as various social media, skype, mixit, web based solutions outside of the control university, as well as other ICT solutions they may have developed themselves. Despite this, the e-learning seems to be the way to go at the university. In rural areas, the unavailability of computers, the internet and electricity is indeed a major constraint. This seems to be the problem even in developed countries.
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E-LEARNING: PERCEPTIONS OF STUDENTS AT THE JOSIP JURAJ STROSSMAYER UNIVERSITY OF OSIJEK

E-LEARNING: PERCEPTIONS OF STUDENTS AT THE JOSIP JURAJ STROSSMAYER UNIVERSITY OF OSIJEK

E-learning exhibits a growing presence at Croatian universities. Its implementation in the higher education system is part of the eff ort to improve the process of higher education and to make a signifi cant step forward in turning the Republic of Croatia into information and knowledge society. In these eff orts, one of the biggest problems is the unequal level of success in introducing e-learning, which is directly refl ected in its acceptance level among student population. Whereas certain higher education institutions, primarily those providing information and computer science programs, are already applying this modern learning and teaching concept to a high degree, the others have yet to start implementing its basic forms. Within the Croatian higher education system no adequate research has been carried out regarding student perception of e-learning, i.e. it has not been investigated to what extent it is accepted among the students. Without a comprehensive analysis of this aspect, it is impossible to take full advantage of all its potentials and properly formulate development strategies for the future. This paper seeks to fi ll this gap, at least to a certain degree. Adequate methods of descriptive and inferential statistics have been used in the analysis.
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Students with learning disabilities : an exploration of university staff perceptions

Students with learning disabilities : an exploration of university staff perceptions

P5: Mmmm (yes). Because I think you go into survival mode. You know, its adapt or die, your body will find that survival mechanism, a person with concentration skills will comprehend information but they will be busy doing something else for a long period of time until they process it properly, or they communicate it properly. But those students very often, they process the information and they are bored, and that is why they disrupt lectures or talk or go on a tangent, because the processed it and they are on the next step. Whereas the rest of the bunch are not on that step. And then you are questions and try and accommodate everyone up to speed but its um South Africa is very unique because we have such very different backgrounds in terms of our education system and you pick it up in first year, it’s the hardest year to teach because its um, so diverse, just the concept of, student are from such different backgrounds they are dealing with very different issues, they have students that are dealing with the city, they have students that are dealing with the language, there are some students that are dealing with the city, there are some students that have complete freedom and they finally are free, you know they are in a very different head space, and it comes through in the class, and how they process and how they engage with the lecture, some are petrified and they don’t say a word, and even if they are lost they will remain lost because they won’t communicate anything, whereas then there are others that will over communicate and um, it’s not necessarily about a learning disability, but about it could also be, it’s just about the environment, they are out of the school environment.
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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA

Module 7: Reading in an additional language (MAPP083) Most of the world’s information and knowledge is stored in the written word, either as printed texts or as electronic texts. The ability to read gives one access to this information and knowledge, and in today’s world, information is power. During the first two or so years of schooling, children learn to read and write, i.e. they are taught what the written symbols of language stand for and how to convey meaning via written symbols. Once children have learned to read, they are expected to read to learn. In other words, texts – the written word – become an important source for the acquisition of new knowledge and for learning. If students understand what they read, they can become independent learners. Yet there are many students who have problems really understanding what they read, and hence they also have problems reading to learn. Research has established that the most important skill needed in the learning context is the ability to read with understanding. This is especially true for learners who study through the medium of a language other than their first language (English is often the relevant medium). The focus in this module is on reading ability, especially reading in an additional language, at primary, secondary and tertiary level.
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Library usage by university accounting students : a comparison of contact and open distance learning institution in South Africa

Library usage by university accounting students : a comparison of contact and open distance learning institution in South Africa

31 Darch and Underwood (1999) stressed the need to link policy and information technology to promote information literacy through ICT for academic development. Incidentally, Cassidy et al (2011) recognise that academic patrons get motivated through technological advancements employed by academic libraries such as mobile access. Ming-der Wu (2012) questions whether those academic patrons who lived off campus are competent or found library user interfaces friendly and fruitful when accessing library sources outside the confine of the physical library. However, Croft and Davis (2010) argue that while it is useful for academic libraries to have acquisitions of e-books, it is equally important to make acquisition decisions based on patrons’ feedback. In this regard, Bhatti, Tariq and Salman (2014) assume that many patrons cannot benefit from the availability of e-books because they do not have appropriate skills to access them. Meanwhile, Liu and Briggs (2015) explain that even though it is not feasible to duplicate all content of a library’s website in a mobile version, librarians may need to prioritise what patrons find most important on the mobile access technology. Moreover, Deodato (2015) suggests that for librarians to serve their patrons better, they need to subscribe to the use of a technology that allows patrons to access their preferences from a single interface easily.
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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINOLOGY INFORMATION REGARDING POSTGRADUATE COURSES IN CRIMINOLOGY, PENOLOGY AND POLICE SCIENCE

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINOLOGY INFORMATION REGARDING POSTGRADUATE COURSES IN CRIMINOLOGY, PENOLOGY AND POLICE SCIENCE

Furthermore you have to comply with the following requirements: you must achieve an average pass mark of 60 percent for the honours course, and your enrolment for the masters degree may not be delayed more than five (5) years after obtaining the honours degree. If you have studied at another institution, you should determine whether or not Unisa acknowledges those qualifications. You can get more information in this regard from: Department of Postgraduate Student Affairs, PO Box 392, UNISA, 0003, South Africa. The e-mail address for this information is: <postartes@unisa.ac.za>
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Shifting perceptions of black students in a South African university residence

Shifting perceptions of black students in a South African university residence

A review of the international literature reveals that there are a few findings that report on positive interracial experiences of Black students at universities. These take the form of intergroup friendships and how this is linked to important outcomes such as reduced prejudice, increased empathy for out-groups, and lower intergroup anxiety (Schofield et al. 2007), interracial roommate relationships and its benefits (Shook 2007), cross-group friendships and cues of social connectedness to an out-group member (Brannon and Walton 2013) and intergroup contact related to participants engagement in cross-race relationships (Edmonds and Killen 2009). However, the majority of findings in the international literature reveal that contact between black and white students yields negative rather than positive experiences for black students (Smith, Allen and Danley 2007). Most black students are aware of the negativity that white people feel towards them (Livingstone 2002). In some instances this awareness of racism and discrimination has led to ‘cultural mistrust’ which propelled the fear of intergroup contact (Soto, Dawson-Andoh and BeLue 2011). Peer prejudice remained of great concern for black students and led to anxiety (Fisher, Wallace and Fenton 2000). Black students were found to be more susceptible to the effects of stereotype expectation (Chavous et al. 2004). Negative race relations between Blacks and whites in historically white universities led to some black students transferring to historically black universities (Read, Archer and Leathwood 2003) and encouraged black students to self-segregate and further to create social counter spaces (Solorzano, Ceja and Yosso 2000).
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E-visibility of environmental sciences researchers at the University of South Africa

E-visibility of environmental sciences researchers at the University of South Africa

Caberra, Roy and Chisolm (2017:135) mention the rise of contemporary scholarship where researchers are adapting to new scholarly trends driven by new technologies, which are impacting and changing research workflows. The emergence of the Web, the revolution of the scientific journal and the development of Open Access and free usage of research data has meant drastic changes in scholarship and its workflow processes. These new technologies, such as Web 2.0, have identified new demands and created changes for research communities as a result of the changes in which the new generation experiences information (Haustein, Larivière et al., 2014:207; Weller & Strohmaier, 2014:203; Yeong & Abdullah, 2012:1). Bolton, Parasuraman, Hoefnagels, Migchels, Kabadayi, Gruber, Loureiro and Solnet (2013:259) indicate that digital natives (Generation Y) are more comfortable engaging and interacting on social networking tools and in general readily sharing ideas and information; hence the natural embracing of academic social networking tools.
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A STUDY OF IMPACT OF E LEARNING ON UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

A STUDY OF IMPACT OF E LEARNING ON UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

We invite unpublished novel, original, empirical and high quality research work pertaining to recent developments & practices in the area of Computer, Business, Finance, Marketing, Human Resource Management, General Management, Banking, Insurance, Corporate Governance and emerging paradigms in allied subjects like Accounting Education; Accounting Information Systems; Accounting Theory & Practice; Auditing; Behavioral Accounting; Behavioral Economics; Corporate Finance; Cost Accounting; Econometrics; Economic Development; Economic History; Financial Institutions & Markets; Financial Services; Fiscal Policy; Government & Non Profit Accounting; Industrial Organization; International Economics & Trade; International Finance; Macro Economics; Micro Economics; Monetary Policy; Portfolio & Security Analysis; Public Policy Economics; Real Estate; Regional Economics; Tax Accounting; Advertising & Promotion Management; Business Education; Management Information Systems (MIS); Business Law, Public Responsibility & Ethics; Communication; Direct Marketing; E-Commerce; Global Business; Health Care Administration; Labor Relations & Human Resource Management; Marketing Research; Marketing Theory & Applications; Non- Profit Organizations; Office Administration/Management; Operations Research/Statistics; Organizational Behavior & Theory; Organizational Development; Production/Operations; Public Administration; Purchasing/Materials Management; Retailing; Sales/Selling; Services; Small Business Entrepreneurship; Strategic Management Policy; Technology/Innovation; Tourism, Hospitality & Leisure; Transportation/Physical Distribution; Algorithms; Artificial Intelligence; Compilers & Translation; Computer Aided Design (CAD); Computer Aided Manufacturing; Computer Graphics; Computer Organization & Architecture; Database Structures & Systems; Digital Logic; Discrete Structures; Internet; Management Information Systems; Modeling & Simulation; Multimedia; Neural Systems/Neural Networks; Numerical Analysis/Scientific Computing; Object Oriented Programming; Operating Systems; Programming Languages; Robotics; Symbolic & Formal Logic and Web Design. The above mentioned tracks are only indicative, and not exhaustive.
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Implications of the University of South Africa\u27s (UNISA) shift to Open Distance e-Learning on Teacher Education

Implications of the University of South Africa\u27s (UNISA) shift to Open Distance e-Learning on Teacher Education

commissioned studies led by Roger Mills of Cambridge University in the United Kingdom, and the South African Institute for Distance Education (SAIDE) are worthy of mention. On the one hand, Mills (2011) cautions that Unisa might not be ready for e-learning or ODeL. He is doubtful that Unisa is ready to function as an ODeL university such as Athabasca in Canada or Phoenix in Arizona, United States of America (USA). On the other hand, the SAIDE (2012) study expresses a hopeful view for Unisa to facilitate interactions with students through digital approaches. While the two studies convey different messages, it stands to reason that Unisa needs to pay careful attention to the development of robust ICT infrastructure and other emerging digital technologies if it hopes to hit the ground running in its roll out of the ODeL mode of teaching and learning. It is crucial at this stage to mention that there is a tendency at Unisa to think that the use of modern electronic technologies implies a form of panacea to our modern day challenges to teaching and learning. This tendency is predicated on the belief that traditional distance education methods like correspondence through hardcopy material, telephonic discussions with distance students, and traditional library holdings in the form of hardcopy textbooks and scholarly journals are outdated and should therefore be done away with. I have a contrary view by contending that the two approaches to teaching and learning can be optimized by viewing, and using them as complementary to one another. Print media still has many miles to go, and much to live for. For teachers to benefit from the programmes, Unisa has to ensure that it teaches and supports students in ways that enrich their learning experiences.
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University Students’ Perceptions of Social Media as a Learning Tool

University Students’ Perceptions of Social Media as a Learning Tool

The survey included some questions designed to provide information about KAU students’ background in using the Internet and social media. These questions are shown in Table 2, together with their corresponding re- sponses. The responses indicated that KAU students are familiar with and are immersed in the Internet and social media use. The majority of students use the Internet for more than 10 hours per week, have social media accounts for at least one year, access them for at least 6 hours per week and feel confident in their skills in dealing with so- cial media. More than half of the students prefer to use social media in both Arabic and English languages. A mod- erately high majority of students use social media in their studies for one or more courses at KAU, with a similar proportion wanting to integrate social media as a tool in their learning at university.
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Quality of distance e-learning at Saudi universities : students' perceptions

Quality of distance e-learning at Saudi universities : students' perceptions

a reputable one). Secondly, demographics and democratic ideals have created a larger cohort of potential students who wish to attend HE and believe they have the right to. These students stand to benefit from a process of globalisation that “influences teaching and learning, but also the ability of students to deal with social and cultural differences” (Hou, 2011, p.179). Universities, which have operated in largely the same way for hundreds of years (Guri- Rosenblit, 2014, p.119), are being forced to adapt to the reality of a globalised world. For some institutions, this “offers exciting new opportunities no longer limited by national boundaries”, but for others, such drastic change has proved to be a threatening phenomenon. A strategic plan in the age of globalisation may use DeL, which allows the institution to “transcend national borders and admit huge numbers of students” (ibid), though such strategies have the attendant risk of decreasing quality or creating conflicts between educational cultures. The struggle to maintain quality in DeL has resulted in an interest in international accreditation: “a symbolic and powerful indicator” (Hou, 2011, p.180). According to Hou, the struggle both to maintain quality and to compete with international benchmarks will “likely exert pressures to varying degrees for quality assurance reforms within [national] education frameworks” (ibid, p.180).
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Information Management in the age of E-government- the case of South Africa

Information Management in the age of E-government- the case of South Africa

The concept of e-government will be anathema to many local government practitioners and citizens. The experience of looking for information on government websites which are years out of date, will be matched by the experience of fancy call centres and portals which fall apart the minute one is looking for detailed information or service within back offices. Such skepticism may be reinforced by the tendency of ill-informed officials to install expensive and complex IT systems which government agencies are ill equipped to maintain or use effectively. Such negative experiences need to be countered by the real possibilities opened up by e-government. Variable capacities of municipalities in South Africa suggest that an approach toward e-government which is incremental may be prudent. Otherwise one might end up with yet more white elephants. (McIntosh, 2003)
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J. A. Thomson Department of Microbiology, University of Cape Town, South Africa

J. A. Thomson Department of Microbiology, University of Cape Town, South Africa

Kohli, A. M. Leech, P. Vain, D.A. Laurie, and P. Christou. (1998) Transgene organization in rice engineered through direct DNA transfer supports a two-phase integration mechanism mediated by the establishment of integration hot spots. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, USA 95, 7203- 7208. [This paper deals with the mechanisms of DNA integration into plants.]

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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA

The research project must not be less than 8 000 and not more than 10 000 words in length. This should be a guide to you to determine whether your scope is too wide or too narrow. There are still students who do not stick to these minimum and maximum requirements. Consequently, their projects are too wide or too narrow in scope which causes them to lose marks. You must, therefore, definitely abide by this stipulation. 8.2.5 METHOD OF INVESTIGATION FOR THE RESEARCH

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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA

Consult Part 1 in the Calendar for information pertaining to the general rules for admission to postgraduate studies, documents that must accompany students' applications, the number of papers for which students must register, reregistration, duration of the course, applications for cancellation, etcetera.

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