Top PDF Studies on mouse embryo cultures infected with polyoma virus

Studies on mouse embryo cultures infected with polyoma virus

Studies on mouse embryo cultures infected with polyoma virus

Here too, only a small proportion of the cell population is transformed after infection w ith t he virus lOO and, in addition , SV 40 induced hamster tumors possess a new a ntigen -- one[r]

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Studies of polyoma virus DNA: cleavage map of the polyoma virus genome.

Studies of polyoma virus DNA: cleavage map of the polyoma virus genome.

Electron microscope determination of the distribution of lengths of the endonuclease R Hin d partial digestion products, we compared the molecular weight of each partially digested fragm[r]

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Studies of temperature sensitive mutants of polyoma virus

Studies of temperature sensitive mutants of polyoma virus

This conclusion may, however, · be invalid when the multiplicity of infection is high as in this experiment; the time of the temperature sensitiv:e step may be overestimated if, within t[r]

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Effect of Ultraviolet Irradiation and Actinomycin D on Polyoma Virus Replication in Mouse Embryo Cell Cultures

Effect of Ultraviolet Irradiation and Actinomycin D on Polyoma Virus Replication in Mouse Embryo Cell Cultures

The observation that UV irradiation or actinomycin D treatment impaired the capacity of mouse embryo cells to replicate 12 polyoma virus posed the question of whether cells thus treated [r]

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Deoxyribonucleotide Pools and Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis in Mouse Embryo Cells Infected with Three Classes of Polyoma Virus Particles

Deoxyribonucleotide Pools and Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis in Mouse Embryo Cells Infected with Three Classes of Polyoma Virus Particles

For the preparation of and measured their capacity to increase DNA the CsCl gradient, 105 hemagglutinating units of the precursor pools as well as to increase DNA partially purified radi[r]

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DNA polymerase activities induced by polyoma virus infection of 3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

DNA polymerase activities induced by polyoma virus infection of 3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

DNA polymerase activities were determined in nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts from five sets of cultures: i uninfected cells harvested at the time of infection; ii mock-infected cells ha[r]

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Interactions of Polyoma and Mouse DNAs I. Lytic Infection of Bromodeoxyuridine-Prelabeled Mouse Embryo Cells

Interactions of Polyoma and Mouse DNAs I. Lytic Infection of Bromodeoxyuridine-Prelabeled Mouse Embryo Cells

To compare the time course of infection and the production of progeny virus in ME-BU and untreated ME cultures, the cells were grown and maintained after infection in low serum 1% medium[r]

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Protein Synthesis in Newcastle Disease Virus-Infected Chicken Embryo Cells

Protein Synthesis in Newcastle Disease Virus-Infected Chicken Embryo Cells

Total Let rt = rate of 3H-amino acid accumulation in polypeptides of infected cultures expressed as a percentage of uninfected control culture at time t.. The absolute rate of 3H-amino a[r]

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Ultrastructure of Junín Virus in Mouse Whole Brain and Mouse Brain Tissue Cultures

Ultrastructure of Junín Virus in Mouse Whole Brain and Mouse Brain Tissue Cultures

The infection was carried out with 0.1 ml of mouse brain suspension containing 105-7 LD,0 of Junfn virus per ml; the second was cerebellum obtained from mice that had been inoculated int[r]

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Interactions of Polyoma and Mouse DNAs III. Mechanism of Polyoma Pseudovirion Formation

Interactions of Polyoma and Mouse DNAs III. Mechanism of Polyoma Pseudovirion Formation

2D, the mouse DNA was observed, and only 1 to 1.2 Mg proportion of pseudovirions was always higher of polyoma DNA per dish was found the in virus preparations isolated from the cell laye[r]

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Mycoplasmal Deoxyribonuclease Activity in Virus-infected L-Cell Cultures

Mycoplasmal Deoxyribonuclease Activity in Virus-infected L-Cell Cultures

Degradation of deoxyribonucleic acid and alteration of nucleic acid metabolism in suspension cultures of L-M cells infected with equine abortion virus.. The effects of ribonucleic acid a[r]

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Micrurgical studies on virus-infected plants

Micrurgical studies on virus-infected plants

I t was intended to pick up small pieces from different parts of the cell contents and to compare the amounts of virus present. This involved having a ready test for the presence of minute quantities of virus: it was imagined th a t inoculation would provide such a test, but this soon proved totally inadequate. I t was then thought th a t the amounts injected were too small to contain the minimal dose necessary to cause infection. But when quantities of virus, certainly sufficient to produce the diseased con­ dition, were injected by micro-pipette directly into cells, in no case was more than one-tenth of the expected number of infections obtained (Sheffield 1936). The inoculation test was therefore temporarily abandoned, and a serological test similar to th a t designed by Matsumoto (1935) was tried. This too proved unsatisfactory. In order to carry out such a test with minute quantities of antigen it was necessary to watch the reaction under dark-ground illumination where it was found impossible to dis­ tinguish with certainty between an antiserum-antigen precipitate and the various granules and globules of the cytoplasm. A ring test was then tried in the micro-pipette, a drop of antiserum being picked up after the antigen. The end of the pipette containing the ring was broken off and mounted. No ring was visible by transm itted light, and it was very difficult to make pipettes of the exact size to give a mount of the thickness necessary for dark-ground examination. I t was then decided to abandon the finer experiments planned, to collect larger quantities of extracted material, and to inoculate these into leaves which would show local lesions. Purified virus was to be used as a standard with which to compare the extracted material. This method was applied to Solanum nodiforum in­ fected with aucuba mosaic disease.
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No Evidence of Infectious Retroviruses in Measles Virus Vaccines Produced in Chicken Embryo Cell Cultures

No Evidence of Infectious Retroviruses in Measles Virus Vaccines Produced in Chicken Embryo Cell Cultures

ization, the membrane was washed with 6⫻ SSPE–1% SDS four times at room temperature for 10 min each time. The final wash was done with 1⫻ SSPE–1% SDS for 3 min at 50°C. The membrane was autoradiographed using Kodak XAR film. Construction of a plasmid DNA standard for Alu PCR. AMLV-infected PBMC DNA was amplified by Alu PCR using primers AMLV F1-A3, AMLV F2-Tag3, and AMLV F3-Tag3 as described above (see Fig. 4A, panel E). A 1.2-kb amplified fragment (see Fig. 4B, panel E, lane 2) was purified from the agarose gel using a Qiaquick column (Qiagen, Santa Clarita, Calif.). The frag- ment was subcloned in pCRII vector DNA (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, Calif.), and nucleotide sequences were determined. The AMLV long terminal repeat (LTR) was identified near Alu in the cellular DNA. See Fig. 4A, panel E, for the orientation of the AMLV LTR with respect to the Alu repeat. The AMLV LTR-Alu DNA was used to introduce the EAV LTR to create an AMLV-EAV two-LTR–Alu standard DNA. The EAV LTR fragment was PCR amplified from CEF total cellular DNA using primers EAV F17 and EAV R15, which contain AscI and Bsu36I restriction sites, respectively (EAV F17, 5⬘-AGCTCTAGAGG CGCGCCTGTTGTAATAGGCGTG-3⬘; EAV R15, 5⬘-TACCGGTACCTGAG GCTTGTTGCCTTTCGCAGC-3⬘). The amplified fragment was gel purified, and the EAV LTR (5⬘ 3 3⬘) was cloned into AscI and Bsu36I sites present in the cellular sequences located between the AMLV LTR and Alu in the AMLV LTR-Alu DNA. See Fig. 5, panel I, C, for the orientation of the EAV LTR with respect to the Alu repeat. The two-LTR–Alu DNA was used to determine the sensitivity of Alu PCR amplification with EAV primers.
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Molecular Studies of Neural Tube Defect Development in the Mouse Embryo

Molecular Studies of Neural Tube Defect Development in the Mouse Embryo

Teratogenic effects of lithium on cultured rat embryos have also been reported (Klug et a l, 1992), including blebs in the cranial region, poor yolk sac circulation and abnormal development of the otic and optic vesicles and dorsal recess of the otocyst. These effects were not reversed by addition of inositol which is perhaps not surprising because lithium is an uncompetitive inhibitor, binding only to the enzyme-substrate complex, and therefore causing a greater degree of inhibition at higher substrate concentrations. In mouse embryos, similar malformations were not reported (Hansen et a l, 1990) but there was an increase of cranial NTD at the highest concentration used, 5 mM. This would be predicted if lithium depletes the level of inositol by inhibition o f inositol phosphate recycling, since inositol deficiency is known to cause cranial NTD (Cockroft et a l,
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Spontaneous Release of Endogenous Ecotropic Type C Virus from Rat Embryo Cultures

Spontaneous Release of Endogenous Ecotropic Type C Virus from Rat Embryo Cultures

The SD-1 cells at passage 24 and F-1 cells at passage 23 showed budding type C particles by electron microscopy and reacted by CF with an antiserum to RaLV p30 but not with antisera to m[r]

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ICP34.5 mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 strain 17syn+ are attenuated for neurovirulence in mice and for replication in confluent primary mouse embryo cell cultures.

ICP34.5 mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 strain 17syn+ are attenuated for neurovirulence in mice and for replication in confluent primary mouse embryo cell cultures.

48-55 0022-538X/94/$04.00 + 0 Copyright C 1994, American Society for Microbiology ICP34.5 Mutants of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Strain 17syn+ Are Attenuated for Neurovirulence in Mice a[r]

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Electron Microscopy of Monkey Kidney Cell Cultures Infected with Rubella Virus

Electron Microscopy of Monkey Kidney Cell Cultures Infected with Rubella Virus

Light microscopy of rubella virus-infected tissue culture cells by use of fixed and stained preparations 28, 30 or by techniques employing immunofluorescence 2, 31 indicate the presence [r]

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Effect of 5-methylcytidine on virus production in avian sarcoma virus-infected chicken embryo cells.

Effect of 5-methylcytidine on virus production in avian sarcoma virus-infected chicken embryo cells.

Furthermore, since the levels of virus-specific RNA as well as viral proteins are slightly elevated in 5mC- compared with cytidine-treated cells, it is unlikely that the block of virus y[r]

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Interactions of Polyoma and Mouse DNAs. IV. Time Course and Extent of Integration of Polyoma DNA into Mouse DNA During Lytic Infection

Interactions of Polyoma and Mouse DNAs. IV. Time Course and Extent of Integration of Polyoma DNA into Mouse DNA During Lytic Infection

Separation ofpolyoma DNA and HL mouse DNA after a mixed extraction of uninfected BUdRprelabeled ME cultures and polyoma-infected mouse kidney cultures Polyoma DNA detected in mouse DNA E[r]

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Synthesis of multimeric polyoma virus DNA in mouse L-cells: role of the tsA1S9 gene product.

Synthesis of multimeric polyoma virus DNA in mouse L-cells: role of the tsA1S9 gene product.

Having confirmed that unit size Py DNA genome is synthesized in tsAlS9 and in WT-4 cells incubated at 34 or 38.5°C 33, we sought to determine whether viral DNA is present as larger-molec[r]

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