Top PDF Submission to the review on. Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

Submission to the review on. Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

Submission to the review on. Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

It could be that this is because all universities run their teaching at significant losses. But there does not appear to be any significant evidence that this is true. It could be that each university feels that the demand for its places is rather inelastic (i.e., demand will not fall very much as fees increase) as a function of tuition fees. This could be because the average graduate currently only pays half the long-run cost of the fees or that some students regard the level of fees as a signal of the quality of the course. Of course whatever the fee, up to £3,225, the university will get their declared fee in cash up front from the state, even if its graduates do not earn enough for the state to recoup its expenditure. So the university will gain from high fees and the university’s students will not lose much due to the state’s subsidy. Hence universities have a strong positive incentive to have higher fees and students have a very weak incentive to select another university to try to lower their fees. This suggests that if the state were to increase the current fee cap of £3,225 nearly all universities would set their fees at the fee cap, unless the cap is increased very significantly. Further, the universities with the highest fees will receive the highest amount of state subsidy, which seems odd. What is more as financial support for tuition fees is subsidised raising fees could be very expensive for the state – with the state picking up the bill for half the new charges in the long run according to Table 2. Of course removing the Rate Subsidy should improve all of these issues somewhat.
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The Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance Arrangements in Wales

The Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance Arrangements in Wales

9.2.3 The moderated fee should continue to be topped-up with institutional learning and teaching grants for HEIs, paid through HEFCW. In order to ensure that public investment in part-time students is comparable to that for full-time students, the Review Panel recommends that the total grant provision is determined by applying the difference between the full-time and part-time RAB to the average loan (fee and maintenance) available to part-time students. This approach generates a notional teaching grant in the region of £1,250 per student (typical rate based on 50% full-time equivalent). It is also recommended that HEIs receive pro-rata top-up payments for high cost subjects in respect of part-time students, just as they would continue to do under our proposals in respect of full-time students, allocated directly to HEIs by HEFCW. To be eligible for this top-up payment, HEIs must be able to demonstrate to HEFCW that they deliver part-time education in a manner that encourages students to be able to earn as they learn (i.e. the funding is predicated on the organisation in receipt being regulated to ensure quality and organisation).
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Securing a sustainable future for higher education : an independent review of higher education funding and student finance

Securing a sustainable future for higher education : an independent review of higher education funding and student finance

Scrutiny of Access Commitments by the HE Council will be tougher for institutions with higher charges, especially those seeking to charge above £7,000 per year (which is roughly equivalent to what institutions will have to charge to maintain investment at current levels based on our assumptions about the reduction in HEFCE funding). Institutions will also set out how much they spend on access-related activities. No minimum spend will be required from institutions that meet their targets on access and completion. Institutions that do not meet their targets will have to agree with the HE Council a minimum level of spend – set with reference to the current sector average – that will be used to improve performance. The HE Council will ensure that the targets require the institution to improve its performance and will reserve the right to refuse to agree an Access Commitment where it does not feel that the institution has committed to significant improvement. This would mean that the institution would no longer be able to admit students with access to the Student Finance Plan for the costs of learning.
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The Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance Arrangements in Wales

The Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance Arrangements in Wales

12. To develop a new cadre of researchers in Wales, the Review Panel recommends that Welsh Government funding should be made available to support programmes for postgraduate researchers. We propose scholarships of up to three years duration for 150 research students each year, initially for three years. These scholarships, for both fees and maintenance, should be funded in a three way equal partnership between the Welsh Government, the university in which the research student will be based, and another funder either from the private, public or third sector. The scholarship should, therefore, be free to the individual student and would be in addition to current HEFCW funding for postgraduate research.
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The Independent Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

The Independent Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

Participation: The current HE system does not meet the aspirations of many people who want to enter HE. There are not enough places for those who want to study full time and there is insufficient support for those who want to study part time. The Review states that “Fair Access has not been achieved” 3 .

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The Browne Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

The Browne Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance

What is less convincing is the argument for removing any cap and allowing unconstrained fees. If these proposals are implemented then England will be virtually the only public higher education system in the world (including in the United States) with no government imposed fee cap. The reason all other countries regard university fee levels as a matter where the government has an interest is that the fees charged by universities – and the implications of this for access and participation – are matters of public interest. It is implausible to say, as the Committee does, that it felt unable to set a limit because there was no objective way of doing so. All other jurisdictions find it possible.
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The Government's proposals on higher education funding and student finance and their impact on access to higher education

The Government's proposals on higher education funding and student finance and their impact on access to higher education

Lifting the fee cap to £9,000 for new students in England from 2012 is a welcome reform that will help our universities maintain and enhance their world-class status. Increased graduate contributions will provide a life-saving cash transfusion for a sector that would otherwise be seriously ailing from the spending review’s deep cuts. These reforms are the only way for the UK to remain a serious global player in higher education, while our international competitors are pumping billions into their leading universities. This is now make or break for our universities. Our graduates need to compete with the best in the world, and we would be letting them down if we did not ensure they get the very best education.
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House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library : Briefing paper : Number 7393, 1 July 2019 : Higher education funding in England

After consultation the Government decided to freeze the repayment threshold for all post-2012 borrowers. The discount rate used for the public accounting of loans was reduced from 2.2% to 0.7%. These changes were expected to result in savings to current spending when grants are ended, and a substantial cut in the subsidy element of loans. On 1 October 2017 the Prime Minister announced a number of changes to these policies: The fee cap would be frozen in 2018-19, the repayment threshold would rise to £25,000 and a there would be a review of the student finance system. The Department for
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Higher education funding in England

Higher education funding in England

Government estimates of the RAB cost of student loans are calculated using a student loan repayment model. This makes long term forecasts of repayments for individual borrowers and is highly complex. There is a substantial amount of uncertainty about future repayment levels which are connected in large part to earnings growth forecasts. The paper HE in England from 2012: Funding and finance looks in depth at changes/improvements to the loan model over time.

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Review of higher education in Wales. Phase 1, Student finance arrangements : report from the chair of the Task and Finish Group

Review of higher education in Wales. Phase 1, Student finance arrangements : report from the chair of the Task and Finish Group

The Group concluded that Ministers should consider whether they wish to continue the Tuition Fee Grant policy. If Ministers do wish to encourage full- time students who live in Wales to study in Wales, this should be pursued instead by making study at Welsh HEIs more attractive, both by enhancing their capacity to offer additional bursaries and scholarships, and by increasing the funds available for the resources of Welsh HEIs. This would enhance student choice, encouraging students who live in Wales to choose to stay rather than experiencing a financial pressure to do so.

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House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing Paper: Number 1079, 6 February 2019: Student Loan Statistics

But the expansion of higher education relies on funding being put onto a sustainable footing. The government must therefore ask graduates to meet more of the cost of their degrees once they are earning. From the 2016-17 academic year, maintenance grants will be replaced with maintenance loans for new students from England, paid back only when their earnings exceed £21,000 a year, saving £2.5 billion by 2020-21. To ensure that the long term costs of the student loan book remain affordable and transparent, the government will consult on freezing the loan repayment threshold for five years and review the discount rate applied to student loans and other transactions to bring it into line with the government’s long-term cost of borrowing.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5440, 20 March 2017: Higher Education Finance Statistics

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 5440, 20 March 2017: Higher Education Finance Statistics

The higher education sector is braced for a future where income does not always grow year-on-year, student numbers do not always go up, the balance of income streams is less predictable and cuts may have to be made. In some cases this scenario has already arrived. Many of the sector’s income streams are not planned in advance and we do not know how they have changed at an aggregate level until almost around 10 months after the end of the academic year. Only funding body grants are known at an institutional level for the current and upcoming academic year. These made up just under 39% of total income in 2011/12, but as they set the parameters for funded home and EU student numbers and research activity they have a direct effect on variable fee income and other income streams.
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Capitalizing on Higher Education the  Australian Way

Capitalizing on Higher Education the Australian Way

Investment in higher education in Australia: The OECD has repeatedly highlighted the low levels of public funding in tertiary education in Australia, thereby granting it the rank of second- lowest (by public funding) in its 2016 report 33 . On the other hand, as compared to the national average of USD 12,600 in Spain and USD 11,800 in Portugal, Australia's expenditure per tertiary student is comparatively higher, resting at an average of USD 20,300. A realistic representation of the finance received by the Australian higher education system thus demands greater consideration given to private investment. Australia’s education system derives significant finances from private institutions, with higher education being the largest beneficiary. Even though recent government plans show an intent to increase public funding on higher education, the existing infrastructure, faculty training, research inclination and exposure, and innovative curricula are almost entirely outcomes of greater private funding through loans, grants, and scholarships. To justify the claims of quality and capacity, a dominant role of private investment in Australia must be recognized 34 .
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Current and Proposed Higher Education Student Finance Arrangements in the UK Regions

Current and Proposed Higher Education Student Finance Arrangements in the UK Regions

Both Wales and Scotland have laid out their initial positions, with Wales‟s increasing fees but with the Government taking on this increased cost. Scotland has held its fees at its current prices but has made it clear that students from other UK regions will be expected to pay the full amount for fees. Both of these regions are undertaking debates regarding the future of HE, with the Scottish Government producing a Green Paper to enable discussion around a number of issues, including funding and future financial arrangements.

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The Implementation of Higher Education Funding in Indonesia

The Implementation of Higher Education Funding in Indonesia

This survey-based research was conducted for 1 (one) year starting from Octo- ber 2012-October 2013. Data collection was conducted at Science-Applied Technology and Educational University based which has a good category in educational financing management according to Directorate of Higher Educa- tion’s standard. The location of the research university is spread on Sumatra and Java islands, and then selected 4 (four) universities in proportional sampling on each island namely: State University of Bengkulu, Dehasen University, Mu- hammadiyah University of Bengkulu, Prof Dr Hazairin SH University, Gadjah Mada University, State University of Yogyakarta, Ahmad Dahlan University, and State Islamic University of Yogyakarta. From 8 (eight) universities, 32 res- pondents were selected from the head and staff of Administrative Bureau of Academic and Student Affairs (BAAK) or Bureau of Public Administration and Finance (BAUK) and involved in the Focus Group Discussion (FGD), question- naires, and interviews conducted separately in accordance with the timing of the data collection. Data analysis techniques using descriptive statistics, meaning the data obtained is described by using the following percentage formula: Percentage of answers = f/n × 100%. F = frequency of subjects choosing alternatives; n = total number of subjects [17], 2). Other analytical techniques of narrative de- scriptive with the approach pioneered by Miles, Huberman & Saldaña [18] are applied through three paths: Data Reduction, Data Presentation, and Conclu- sion.
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House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

House of Commons Library: Briefing paper: Number 7393, 14 June 2017: Higher education funding in England

BIS estimates of the RAB cost of student loans are calculated using a student loan repayment model. This makes long term forecasts of repayments for individual borrowers and is highly complex. There is a substantial amount of uncertainty about future repayment levels which are connected in large part to earnings growth forecasts. The paper HE in England from 2012: Funding and finance looks in depth at changes/improvements to the loan model over time.

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Higher education finance statistics

Higher education finance statistics

The higher education sector is braced for a future where income does not always grow year- on-year, student numbers do not always go up, the balance of income streams is less predictable and cuts may have to be made. In some cases this scenario has already arrived. Many of the sector’s income streams are not planned in advance and we do not know how they have changed at an aggregate level until almost around 10 months after the end of the academic year. Only funding body grants are known at an institutional level for the current and upcoming academic year. These made up just under 39% of total income in 2011/12, but as they set the parameters for funded home and EU student numbers and research activity they have a direct effect on variable fee income and other income streams.
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Review of higher education in Wales. Phase 1, Student finance arrangements : report from the chair of the Task and Finish Group

Review of higher education in Wales. Phase 1, Student finance arrangements : report from the chair of the Task and Finish Group

Cymhariaeth â’r trefniadau cyllid myfyrwyr cyfredol ar gyfer myfyrwyr sydd fel arfer yn byw yn Lloegr Enghraifft o hawl myfyriwr Mewn cymhariaeth, gallai myfyriwr israddedig AU amser lla[r]

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Reform of higher education funding in England

Reform of higher education funding in England

The current system has the further disadvantage that it reinforces the idea that students carry an additional fixed burden of debt into their working lives. Yet, most of us don’t think of our future tax obligations as ‘debt’. I am interested in looking at the feasibility of changing the system of financing student tuition so that the repayment mechanism is variable graduate contributions tied to earnings. I have spoken to Lord Browne about this and he has assured me that he is looking at this issue as part of his review. By looking at the periods of time over which contributions are made, the level of thresholds that trigger the contribution, the rate at which contributions are paid, and the other key variables, it may be possible to levy graduate contributions so that low graduate earners pay no more (or less) and high earners pay more.
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Higher education finance statistics

Higher education finance statistics

The higher education sector is braced for a future where income does not always grow year-on-year, student numbers do not always go up, the balance of income streams is less predictable and cuts may have to be made. In some cases this scenario has already arrived. Many of the sector’s income streams are not planned in advance and we do not know how they have changed at an aggregate level until almost around 10 months after the end of the academic year. Only funding body grants are known at an institutional level for the current and upcoming academic year. These made up just under 39% of total income in 2011/12, but as they set the parameters for funded home and EU student numbers and research activity they have a direct effect on variable fee income and other income streams.
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