Top PDF Teacher CPD delivered by employers. What works?

Teacher CPD delivered by employers. What works?

Teacher CPD delivered by employers. What works?

There is sparse empirical evidence that supports the value and impact of teacher CPD delivered by employers. The literature base contains a small number of qualitative studies that allow us to draw some limited conclusions about teacher placements sug- gesting that CPD delivered by employers could potentially be effective. There were no studies which sought to capture changes in pupil learning or outcomes as a result of the teacher CPD. In addition no robust evaluations of teacher placement CPD exist to explore the ways in which teachers used their learning from their placement in practice.
Show more

24 Read more

What works? : Policies for employability in cities

What works? : Policies for employability in cities

Evidence from the CS initiative suggests that for co-ordination of local services to be successful ideally four key elements should be in place. The first is partner buy-in to the partnership. Ensuring such buy-in is more easily achieved when co-operation and co- ordination works to the advantage of individual partners, than when partners see themselves in competition with one another. In the latter instance they may tend to prioritise organisational objectives over those of the partnership. The second issue is getting the geographical scales of activity right in delivery and co-ordination of services (see also North and Syrett, 2008; North et al, 2009; Etherington and Jones, 2009). Different geographical scales are appropriate for different types of interventions. So co-ordination of local provision might entail establishing outreach services to engage multiply disadvantaged individuals at neighbourhood scale but engaging with employers at city-/sub-regional level. Thirdly, in the case of a formal area-based partnership a strong, and ideally independent, central team to lead and provide the secretariat for the partnership in terms of strategic overview is helpful. These three elements facilitate horizontal co-ordination. The fourth element is joining up vertically between local service and national policy and provision. Ideally, national policy needs to work in the same direction as local policy, and vice versa, in order to reinforce each other’s aims. Moreover, partnership working across policy domains between central government departments at national level tends to help joining-up at local level.
Show more

31 Read more

Careers events : what works?

Careers events : what works?

Positive impacts can be expected to be optimised when young people are well prepared for careers events and undertake follow up activities after the activity. Schools and colleges should set aside time for students to prepare before an event begins. Students consistently report that employer engagement activities were more useful if they have had time to think about their wider ambitions and prepare themselves prior to an event taking place. Educational and careers professionals also highlight that it is important to prepare the young people prior to any event taking place. I've had feedback from employers before to say it would have been more useful for the students to have had some questions in mind so we've really been pushing on that. I think also with the age group we're working with which is mainly 16–18 vocational they struggle with the soft skills, you know the ability to go up to an employer. From other events and other colleges I've worked at I think giving them a chance to prepare questions beforehand, maybe even a bit of role play, really helps their confidence and what they get out of an event.
Show more

36 Read more

What Works in Careers and Enterprise?

What Works in Careers and Enterprise?

In The Careers & Enterprise Company we summarise these benchmarks as being about schools having a stable careers programme which is known and understood by students, parents, teachers, governors and employers. This should ensure that young people have access to encounters,

16 Read more

What works and what's just?

What works and what's just?

But since capacities and motivation are not sufficient for change, and given the criticism that both the RNR and the GLM models are too focussed on the individual level of analysis, it is necessary to turn to the last of the three preconditions of change; the development of opportunities and of social capital. We have already noted that the latter term refers to the resources that inhere in social relationships and networks characterised by shared norms and reciprocal bonds (see Putnam, 2000; McNeill and Whyte, 2007). Social capital theorists have delineated three types of social capital, two of which are most relevant here; bonding social capital refers to close ties with family and friends, bridging social capital refers to more distant ties, for example with a wider network of acquaintances and colleagues (for more detail see McNeill and Whyte, 2007, chapter 9). Unsurprisingly, research indicates not just that high crime communities have low social capital but also that persistent offenders tend to have very little social capital – or at least very little licit social capital. Their damaged ties even to kith and kin – friends and family – force them to rely on illicit and criminal networks, damaging their prospects for desistance (Webster et al, 2006). It follows that supporting desistance requires probation services to help offenders and ex-offenders, where appropriate, to repair the bonding social capital represented in family ties and to prepare for and develop ties with the new families that they form as they establish intimate relationships and become parents. However, this social capital building should also extend to the development of bridging social capital, meaning wider community ties forged with and through employers, NGOs, faith communities and so on. Both by developing their positive contributions to families and by building positive ties with communities, probation services can create channels for the generative activities that seem to be important to those desisting from crime in helping them to see themselves as positive contributors to communities rather than risks or threats to them (McNeill and Whyte, 2007).
Show more

20 Read more

Careers Provision in Colleges: What Works?

Careers Provision in Colleges: What Works?

The survey also found that young adults who described their school-mediated employer engagement activities as ‘helpful in getting a job’, earned up to 16.4 per cent more than peers who did not take part in any activities. Case studies in the research literature found that in addition to increased positive destinations and a reduction in NEET, other benefits of an effective programme were: improved partnership working between schools, colleges and employers, student- reported improvements in the quality of careers guidance, greater awareness of employability skills and progression routes, and subsequent impact on their confidence in subject and career decision making. 31
Show more

40 Read more

True. What Works in Drug & Alcohol Treatment: What Works in Drug & Alcohol Treatment: Question #1:

True. What Works in Drug & Alcohol Treatment: What Works in Drug & Alcohol Treatment: Question #1:

• In contrast, client In contrast, client- -directed, outcome directed, outcome- -informed informed approach begins with experience and outcome the approach begins with experience and outcome the client desires and then works backwards to create client desires and then works backwards to create means by which those will be achieved. Even then, means by which those will be achieved. Even then, client is in charge, helping to fine

15 Read more

Doing 'what works': a substantive grounded theory of teacher perceptions and uses of technology in a Korean university general English department

Doing 'what works': a substantive grounded theory of teacher perceptions and uses of technology in a Korean university general English department

In the interest of objectivity, it is important that a set of principles be established at the onset which clearly frames the author‘s motivations and intentions. The first of these is a general pro- technology bias. It is a fact that technology has made significant inroads into education and is not showing any signs of diminishing in the future. The choice, then, as the author sees it, is not if teachers should use technology, but how or in what way. Second, this study is a qualitative case study that is structured to be as credible and trustworthy as possible, but its methods are designed to discover a theory, not verify or dispute the results of other theories. For instance, the use of a survey questionnaire (along with interviews and observations) help provide a degree of
Show more

15 Read more

Promoting Teacher Engagement with Assessment for Learning through a Flipped CPD based Community of Practice

Promoting Teacher Engagement with Assessment for Learning through a Flipped CPD based Community of Practice

Each research approach has its strengths and limitations; Sarantakos (2013) identifies elements of each to be considered when selecting a case study research approach. For the purpose of this evaluative case study, the following strengths have been identified as aligning with the aims and objectives of the selected research questions. An evaluative case study facilitated in-depth research within natural settings that focus on the life experiences of participants across schools and teachers’ engagement. Additionally, initiating an evaluative case study provided a wider scope for investigating Flipped CPD and its influences on teachers’ classroom assessment practice. No research approach is without its limitations; therefore the following were strongly considered by the researcher in selection of the case study approach. Sarantakos (2013: 227) addresses that with case studies there is “no assurance of objectivity, validity, and reliability” and given that this case study served as an evaluation of the researcher’s personal CPD model, the subjective nature of this evaluation was considered. Given the capacity for a case study to support multiple sources of evidence, a variety of data collection methods were embedded to address this limitation and decrease the subjective nature of an evaluative case study.
Show more

365 Read more

Health Service Integration: What works

Health Service Integration: What works

One solution is to integrate services at the point of delivery to improve co-ordination and service delivery. By providing services together, for example for mothers and their children in one centre, integration ensures that services are managed and delivered together, for efficiency and high quality. It is also believed that integration of care leads to improved and more equitable access for people from different communities and socio-economic backgrounds, greater convenience and satisfaction and better health overall. In contrast, others believe that integration of care may overload healthcare professionals who lack the specialised skills to manage specific diseases, which could
Show more

8 Read more

Lead Generation: What Really Works?

Lead Generation: What Really Works?

For starters, those who say they are doing better than average also report significantly higher lead conversion rates to appointments (51% vs. 42%) and higher conversion rates from appointments to a transaction (52% vs. 41%) when compared to those who say they are not doing as well. It is difficult to say what the cause of this might be. It may be the way they generate their leads or it may be that they simply do a better job with the leads once they have them.

11 Read more

What Works to Prevent Partner Violence?

What Works to Prevent Partner Violence?

Ecological thinking represented a significant step forward for the field of violence studies because it conceptualized the causes of violence as probabilistic rather than deterministic. In other words, factors operating at different levels combine to establish the likelihood of abuse occurring. No single factor is sufficient, or even necessary, for partner violence to occur. There are likely to be different constellations of factors and pathways that may converge to cause abuse under different circumstances. Likewise the same set of genetic, personal history and situational factors (such as abuse in childhood, a proclivity toward impulsiveness, and having too many drinks) may be sufficient to push a particular man toward partner violence in one socio-cultural and community setting, but not in another. One can imagine that a man’s response to “perceived” provocation may be quite different based on what his expectations are regarding male/female relations; whether his friends, neighbours and local authorities are likely to find his behaviour “acceptable” or shameful; and whether his partner has the social permission and economic means to leave him if he crosses the line.
Show more

130 Read more

Advising Parents on Discipline: What Works

Advising Parents on Discipline: What Works

Effects of parent management training and problem solving skills training combined in the treatment of antisocial child behavior. I Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry[r]

9 Read more

THE CHARACTERISTIC OF AN EXEMPLARY TEACHER: WHAT ARE THEY?

THE CHARACTERISTIC OF AN EXEMPLARY TEACHER: WHAT ARE THEY?

Abstract. This article presents the findings of a study conducted in October, 2011 with students studying English at the School of Languages at Sabanci University (SU) and the participants (English teachers, academicians, and English teacher candidates) who attended our presentation "What are the characteristics of a good teacher?" presented at the 15th International INGED Conference, "Taking it to the Limits" held on 20th October, 2011 on their perceived characteristics of the exemplary teacher. The idea to conduct such a study came about upon observation of teachers' unease about the evaluation forms that students complete at the end of each semester. Teachers' perceptions of effective teaching seemed to differ from those of students. Therefore, we decided to prepare various instruments to identify and measure students' perceptions of the characteristics of exemplary language teachers and teachers' perceptions of the characteristics of the exemplary language teacher and compare the results. In light of this aim, 31 intermediate 1 and 2 level students were asked to provide a written response to the prompt "Describe your perception of the good English teacher" to explore the characteristics they find exemplary in their (past and present) language teachers' teaching practices. The participants attending our session at the INGED conference were also presented the same prompt at the beginning of our presentation and asked for a written response. The participants kept their responses until the end of the presentation in case they wanted to make any changes or additions. We hope that the findings in this paper encourage teachers to 're-contemplate' their own teaching methodology and its impacts on students' learning processes, and, if necessary, make changes to their teaching to promote students' language competence and performance.
Show more

11 Read more

A. IT requirements for the CPD

A. IT requirements for the CPD

Abstract —While collaborative product development (CPD) is a technology intensive process, the planning of this technology is a highly neglected topic. The implementation of planned information technologies (IT) can be an enabler of the CPD performance, as collaboration requires coordination on the integrated platforms. This paper aims to put forward a planning framework first by identifying the requirements and system features in the IT domain that support CPD andthen to do prioritization of design requirements and system features for increasing the efficiency of IT planning in CPD process with the assistance of Quality Function Deployment (QFD) based methodology. Incomplete preference relations are considered and a new group decision making approach is provided by merging different preferences into a single one with fuzzy set theory in QFD. The proposed methodology is tested in a real life application of a software development project.
Show more

6 Read more

What Makes a Good Teacher?

What Makes a Good Teacher?

G. Donáth Blanka explored the personality traits necessary for conducting group work successfully. Her studies showed the differences between the samples taken in a closed and in an open group. If the sample covered a large number of students of different ages, the results proved to be surprisingly unified: deep professional knowledge, deep interest in the students, sense of understanding and sense of humor made the basic personality traits of the good teachers. The results were different in a closed group. In that group, the students’ self-image took the priority and it had a deep impact on their relationship with other people. Successful teacher was thought to be socially positive, consistent, and mature but he was not stiff. He was able to set a good example for children and find the balance between his communication and activating students in a particular situation by being restrictive. In addition, he was able to energize his students to develop the students’ intellectual,
Show more

7 Read more

What works in practice: User and provider perspectives on the acceptability, affordability, implementation, and impact of a family-based intervention for child overweight and obesity delivered at scale

What works in practice: User and provider perspectives on the acceptability, affordability, implementation, and impact of a family-based intervention for child overweight and obesity delivered at scale

MEND families have been interviewed in three other re- search studies to our knowledge. These explore views of MEND delivered through primary care [24], views while attending sessions [25], and choices between interventions [26]. Like us, Turner [24] found parents wanted advice from someone who they felt had both the professional and personal experience to understand the difficulties they faced. Staniford and colleagues [25] interviewed families and professionals with experience of a range of obesity treatments. In their study, professionals were disappointed about attrition and lack of long term weight change but also frustrated that families did not become ‘independent’ at the close of the programme. The authors noted that:
Show more

13 Read more

TIPS FOR INTERIOR DESIGN GRADUATES. What Employers Are Looking For

TIPS FOR INTERIOR DESIGN GRADUATES. What Employers Are Looking For

it’s your responsibility to own that professionalism at every level. I’m willing to treat each of my staff to first year dues as an ASID member because life is about opportunities. ASID has been an incredible part of my experience. If I can gift one ounce of what I’ve gained through ASID to

18 Read more

HR OUTSOURCING: WHAT IT CAN DO FOR SMALL EMPLOYERS

HR OUTSOURCING: WHAT IT CAN DO FOR SMALL EMPLOYERS

Access to greater expertise has ranked consistently high as the No. 1 motive for outsourcing among the smallest employers. By contrast, only 42 percent of employers with 1,000 or more employees cited the benefit as a major motivating factor in 2008. Similarly, the percentage of small employers citing strategic priorities as a top reason for outsourcing was more than twice as large as that of the largest employers.

6 Read more

Health in a Handbasket What Employers Need to Know Now

Health in a Handbasket What Employers Need to Know Now

*Penalty imposed if large employer does not offer full-time employees (and their dependents) an opportunity to enroll in minimum essential coverage and at least one of employer’s full[r]

33 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...