Top PDF Teacher Observation : evaluation report and executive summary, November 2017

Teacher Observation : evaluation report and executive summary, November 2017

Teacher Observation : evaluation report and executive summary, November 2017

For the school-level experiment we used the sum of the two GCSE scores as the measure of pupil attainment. For the department- and teacher-level experiments we used the GCSE score for the subject taught by the particular department or teacher as the outcome variable. We also administered Year 10 maths and English tests as a secondary outcome measure of attainment for Year 10 pupils. Although some commercial maths and English tests that cover basic skills are available, we did not feel that these were adequately tailored to provide a valid assessment of the types of changes in student performance that might be expected to result from this intervention. We therefore constructed new, bespoke tests by selecting items from Key Stage 3 past papers covering the ten-year period from 2000 to 2010. We knew that these were robust test items as they were rigorously developed and trialled for the Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency (QCDA) or the Standards and Testing Agency (STA). They also cover a wide range of ability and are appropriate to the age range and the curriculum. Our aim was to provide a valid measure that was more likely to detect subtle changes in student performance, compared with commercially available instruments.
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Evidence for the Frontline: Evaluation report and executive summary. March 2017

Evidence for the Frontline: Evaluation report and executive summary. March 2017

Teachers valued research experts’ contributions in terms of tailoring research to meet their specific inquiry, as well as filtering out less relevant evidence. This was perceived to be a key element of E4F’s ‘added value’ over internet search platforms. Several case-study interviewees suggested that the research experts were of good calibre, from well-known and respected institutions, which gave them confidence in the reliability and quality of the evidence and answers provided. One academic also suggested that the presence of ‘some big names on the site, some important people up there, is very good from teachers’ point of view’. Staff from one school were pleased that the same academic answered all the questions posed by staff members from a particular cluster, which provided consistency and helped foster further discussion between staff and also with the academic. One user noted that they had benefited from ‘a professional discussion which made me question things and think things through more’ (school champion). Brokers reported how they tried to consistently remind teachers about the intended role of dialogue, for example at workshop events and through regular emails. They also made the dialogue/comment ‘button’ on the E4F website more prominent. However, one research expert suggested that their potential contribution (and that of E4F as a whole) had not been fully capitalised upon, demonstrated by the relatively low level of communication and ongoing dialogue with teachers: ‘That was my big disappointment. It felt like my answers were just going into an empty space’. This particular academic reflected that the ‘static’ way in which the answer was posted may have deterred the teacher from responding further. Furthermore, several of the academic researchers interviewed expressed surprise and some disappointment that they had not been asked more questions since signing up to E4F, suggesting that they would like to have had a greater level of involvement.
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Switch-on Effectiveness Trial: Evaluation report and executive summary. May 2017

Switch-on Effectiveness Trial: Evaluation report and executive summary. May 2017

First, the process evaluation indicates that, in some schools, class teacher involvement in Switch-on was limited. While part of the appeal of Switch-on as an intervention is that it is TA-led, evidence from the literature indicates that one-to-one catch up interventions should be ‘additional but explicitly linked to normal teaching and that teachers should monitor progress to ensure tutoring is beneficial’ (Higgins et al., 2014, p. 10). This suggests that even if TAs deliver the intervention, class teachers should be involved to ensure that the intervention is embedded in a wider literacy strategy for the child. The fact that class teachers were not systematically included in the planning and delivery of Switch-on in schools could therefore have undermined the achievement of outcomes. This is a challenge common to many one-to-one interventions that require children to leave the classroom. The previous efficacy trial highlighted the challenge of scheduling the intervention within the school timetable as a barrier to successful implementation. This remained a challenge in the current effectiveness trial and the inconsistent involvement of class teachers appears to have exacerbated timetabling difficulties.
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ScratchMaths: evaluation report and executive summary

ScratchMaths: evaluation report and executive summary

Design recruitment and ethics There were nine schools in total involved. The schools were recruited in the Sheffield City region via a notice in the local maths hub newsletter and from direct contact with schools that are part of SHU's research- engaged practitioners' network. The schools were not involved in either the IoE design process or the main trial. Each school in the CT test design process was offered the opportunity for two teachers to go to a one- day and a separate half-day professional development session run by SHU on teaching computing in primary schools. Ethics and consent followed the same procedures as the main trial. Parental opt-out consent forms were issued by schools to all parents of pupils in classes who would be taking the test. Forms were then collected by the class teacher and any pupils whose parents had returned the form did not take the test. Opt- out forms were managed by the class teachers and SHU were not notified of opt-outs.
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Dialogic Teaching : Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

Dialogic Teaching : Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

"Do you do the same what you do to the bottom?" to the teacher, and another pupil posed a question to peers in a small group: "No, I ’ m talking about if you ’ ve got 8 friends, would you choose a quarter for yourself or share with eight friends?" In terms of "using relevant strategies to build their vocabulary", this appeared to be largely scaffolded by teachers, such as in School A where the teacher asked "We ’ ve got four eras. Can anyone remember what an era is?" Some pupils were observed articulating and justifying answers, arguments and opinions either in a whole class activity or in small groups or pairs. An example of this comes from School A where towards the end of the Literacy lesson the children were working in pairs cutting out pictures of toys and putting them in age order. Two girls had some discussion about ordering the pictures which demonstrates how their private conversation displays the incomplete sentences and deictic references (This, These) common to spoken English as well as (unelaborated) reasoning and justification.
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Philosophy for children : evaluation report and executive summary

Philosophy for children : evaluation report and executive summary

The evaluation team made 30 visits to treatment schools, usually one at the beginning of the intervention and one towards the end to observe changes in teacher and pupil behaviour. Schools were visited repeatedly to assess progress. The trips included observations of the initial training of teachers as well as the delivery of the programme in the classroom. Evaluators attended three training sessions as participant observers, noting the process of implementing P4C, the methods of delivery, and also teachers’ responses to the training. The observations of P4C in action were non- intrusive, with the evaluator sitting either inconspicuously at the back of the classroom or more usually as part of a circle but not taking part in the dialogue unless directly addressed. Interviews with teachers and pupils were also conducted during these visits. These interviews were very informal conversations with teachers and pupils who were involved in doing P4C intervention. In each visit a prior meeting was set up between the P4C lead and the teaching staff to discuss the lesson to be taught that day. The evaluation team members also observed the debriefing sessions after lessons in order obtain teachers’ feedback on P4C sessions.
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Paired Reading: Evaluation report and Executive summary

Paired Reading: Evaluation report and Executive summary

The teacher had an important role in delivering the programme. This included demonstrating the programme approach and monitoring pupil progress. The monitoring of pupil progress occurred by observing and listening to them as the programme progressed but also by reading the pupils’ log books. Teachers were instructed to intervene during their monitoring of pupils but only when a pair was having difficulty to the point of being unable to move forward with the process. However, there were times when teachers needed to take a more pro-active role with certain pairs. This may have been due to personality clashes (such as over-dominant partners or gender issues) or poor communication skills. Furthermore, teachers were also instructed to intervene if pupils had selected books that were either easy or too difficult. The manual suggested that teachers take turns at observing pairs with each observation lasting approximately six minutes.
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Writing about values : evaluation report and executive summary

Writing about values : evaluation report and executive summary

lead-up to GCSEs where they were preparing to be assessed on these skills. In response to the questions, teachers followed the instructions from the sheet provided by Sussex University and, in most cases, children were satisfied with the responses and began writing. There was just one school where we observed considerable resistance to the task. A middle-ability Year 11 set was very suspicious about what they were being asked to do. One pupil said ‘this is so random and confusing, it’s a conspiracy’. Another questioned whether it was ‘some kind of social experiment’. The ‘secret envelopes’ were deemed very ‘dodgy’ and there was vigorous questioning about who was going to read the work and why. These questions created a ripple effect, encouraging others to grumble and occasionally swear about the writing task. The class teacher, an experienced head of department, remained upbeat and positive throughout all of this questioning and stuck closely to the guidance provided. She emphasised the whole-school nature of the project and did eventually get the students to settle and write.
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Embedding Formative Assessment : evaluation report and executive summary

Embedding Formative Assessment : evaluation report and executive summary

Somewhat 28 Very little 5 Not at all 0 During the case study visits, most interviewees (both senior leaders and teachers) were hesitant in concluding that the programme would lead to improvements in pupil attainment within the relatively short time span of two years. Some reasoned it would be hard to disentangle from other initiatives in their school which had worked in tandem with EFA, or the general upward trajectory of the school. Many wondered how it would be measured in the context of government reforms of KS4 and exam specifications. Finally, participants explained that the embedding of formative assessment principles and the improvement in pupils’ approaches to learning was a long process. In addition, teachers frequently observed that the intervention had had more impact on younger pupils who were considered more receptive and less critical to trying new things. In contrast, older pupils were described as more exam-minded and frequently questioning the purpose of specific teaching activities. A common example was peer assessment where older pupils wanted the perspective of the teacher as a subject expert rather than input from a peer. Teachers also explained that older students had not had these types of teaching techniques embedded from a young age, predicting that the new cohort of students would be more receptive to formative assessment techniques. Therefore, some suggested that it would be more appropriate to evaluate the impact on pupil attainment a number of years after delivery, among pupils who were younger at the time of the intervention.
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Hallé SHINE on Manchester : evaluation report and executive summary.

Hallé SHINE on Manchester : evaluation report and executive summary.

From their position, where the projects have worked well it seems to be where there is a functioning partnership of schools which are pro-active in chasing up things (e.g., attendance), take an active interest in the curriculum and that value the programme during the week days at school. The least successful projects have not had good communication systems in place between the schools involved or the links with week day school. All schools have bought into the programme but the leadership and organisational ability to deliver has varied and lead to variability in delivery of programmes. A strong project manager along with high quality staff members to deliver the sessions were also important for good delivery of the programme. Both of these aspects, in turn, lead to the creation of good experiences for the pupils who attend the programme. To get the right project manager requires an investment of time for SHINE and the school head teacher to identify the right person. Only one school was delayed in recruiting a project manager. In most of the projects the project manager was an experienced teacher with a passion for music but not necessarily an existing staff member within the host school; this was different from the London model where most project managers were senior leadership staff in the host school.
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Thinking Maths: Learning Impact Fund Evaluation Report: Evaluation Report and  Executive Summary

Thinking Maths: Learning Impact Fund Evaluation Report: Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

Because the Department developers budgeted for an allocation of 120 teachers to undertake the Thinking Maths Professional Learning sessions in 2017, it was necessary to achieve a random sample of schools that resulted in 120 teacher places. However, while most of the 167 participating schools nominated two teachers, as requested, a small number of schools only nominated one teacher, and two K-12 schools nominated four teachers (two in the Primary year-levels and two in Secondary). A total of 318 teacher places were initially indicated by schools. The first sampling attempt specified 60 schools to be randomly drawn in SPSS, but yielded fewer than 120 teacher places and was rejected. A simple random sample was redrawn, but with 63 schools specified, at which point the desired number of 120 teacher places was achieved. This group of 63 randomly sampled schools and their 120 teachers formed the intervention group. The remaining 104 schools and their teachers formed the control group. The number of students was not known at the time of randomisation, however, once pre-test data and class lists were provided, this involved 2922 students in the treatment group and 4445 students in the control group.
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Summer Active Reading Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

Summer Active Reading Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

The children appeared comfortable with the volunteers and the flexibility of the one to one sessions enabled all children to participate in reading to their volunteer. Booktrust staff noted stronger engagement at the summer events in schools in one city, where pupils were keen to write in their diaries compared with schools in another city where pupils preferred to draw. Booktrust staff had some concern about whether the events had encouraged and inspired the children to use their Summer Active Reading book packs in the holidays (Booktrust staff feedback, observation of summer events.) Engagement in different activities at the summer events appeared to be influenced by group size. For example, the session with a poet worked best where there was only a small group of children and they could receive more individual attention, whereas the outside games worked better for larger groups.
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Thinking, Doing, Talking Science: Evaluation report and Executive summary

Thinking, Doing, Talking Science: Evaluation report and Executive summary

The results of this cluster RCT provide promising evidence that the TDTS intervention has a positive impact on pupils’ science attainment. The effect size was higher for girls to a degree that was unlikely to happen by chance, suggesting that TDTS had a greater effect on girls than boys. This impact on attainment was accompanied by more favourable post-intervention pupil attitudes towards science in TDTS schools compared with the controls, particularly in those areas in line with the project aims. This included science lessons being interesting, making pupils think and science being fun. The differences can be interpreted with reasonable confidence as being a consequence of the TDTS intervention. The TDTS teachers were more likely than teachers in control schools to report using the type of teaching approaches that were part of the intervention, although there was little conclusive evidence of increases in teacher confidence. Intervention teachers were, however, much more positive than their counterparts in the control group about their pupils’ engagement, confidence and ability in science. These findings were supported by the pupils’ response to the survey mentioned above. However, caution should be exercised when looking at these findings, both because of low sample sizes and because TDTS may be receiving a ‘halo effect’ from teachers excited at being involved in the intervention.
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Affordable online maths tuition : evaluation report and executive summary.

Affordable online maths tuition : evaluation report and executive summary.

programmes, such as Skype or text messaging. Some children were anxious about relationships online with ‘strangers’, whist others found their tutors authoritarian and insufficiently sympathetic. This negatively impacted on the children’s engagement. A change of tutor could also be destabilising and lead to disengagement. The tutors’ accent and speed of speaking could be a barrier, as could the use of slang/text language when writing. As discussed, TSL are addressing many of these issues through improved tutor professional development and setting up a dedicated tutor centre in Sri Lanka. Their teacher training programme has been developed with the Institute of
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Summer Active Reading Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

Summer Active Reading Programme : evaluation report and executive summary

The children appeared comfortable with the volunteers and the flexibility of the one to one sessions enabled all children to participate in reading to their volunteer. Booktrust staff noted stronger engagement at the summer events in schools in one city, where pupils were keen to write in their diaries compared with schools in another city where pupils preferred to draw. Booktrust staff had some concern about whether the events had encouraged and inspired the children to use their Summer Active Reading book packs in the holidays (Booktrust staff feedback, observation of summer events.) Engagement in different activities at the summer events appeared to be influenced by group size. For example, the session with a poet worked best where there was only a small group of children and they could receive more individual attention, whereas the outside games worked better for larger groups.
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2017 Monitoring Report Executive Summary

2017 Monitoring Report Executive Summary

Public Consultation 100% of comments, complaints and disputes resolved in a timely manner Yes No FSC complaints or disputes received. Taan received a grievance filed by a group of local residents related to proposed harvesting in Skidegate Lake and potential for loses to livelihood related to mushroom picking. Taan completed brushing of Mamin Mainline as requested by a local resident and continues to address complaints in a timely manner. Taan continues to work with many local residents and groups to improve communications and dialogue. Additionally, consultation was completed for the proposed Forest Stewardship Plan and the FSC Management Plan, HCVF Assessment, Monitoring Report and FSC Controlled Wood Risk Assessment in 2017. Taan has established a public advisory group consisting of Haida representatives. The group has had several meetings and meets regulary.
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. November Evaluation by : National Partner:

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. November Evaluation by : National Partner:

C3. The Institutional framework of the PNEVG has not been explained and developed in all its extension and complexity. A new axis (5) was incorporated in the 2015-2017 Action Plan related to the institutional framework which is intended to complete the previous implementing approach with new political and organic mandates resulting from the institutional reform of the country; this has made the institutional map more complicated and complex by converting an important part of these actors into policy recipients.

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Substitute Teacher Training Report EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Substitute Teacher Training Report EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Summary: Each day, on average, 228 substitute teachers provide instruction to District students. Subskills is designed to prepare individuals with a college degree with the basic skills needed to be successful in a classroom setting. The District can customize training to ensure substitute teachers receive the District-specific information necessary. The Subskills online training delivery model also allows substitute teachers to train when it is convenient for them. Additionally, online blogs, forums, and newsletters at the

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Mutual Evaluation Report Executive Summary

Mutual Evaluation Report Executive Summary

Preventive Measures—Designated Non-Financial Businesses and Professions 31. The AML/CFT preventive measures have not been extended to DNFBPs. The only requirement that applies to this group is an obligation under the Income Tax Law to report cash transactions to the SAT in excess of Mexican pesos $100 000 (equivalent to approximately US$10 000). This is an obligation imposed on all taxpayers and NPOs. In addition, notaries public are required to report to the SAT every purchase of real estate in Mexico in which they participate regardless of the method of payment. This information is available to the FIU for AML/CFT purposes.
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Maths counts : evaluation report and executive summary

Maths counts : evaluation report and executive summary

The Digital Tool The unique feature of MC is the Digital Tool, which was specifically developed to support the MC programme. It has never been used before in other similar maths interventions. The process evaluation revealed some initial difficulties and glitches reported by LPs. For example, some found it difficult to navigate the Digital Tool to select the learning objectives and the matching activities. Learning partners also found that it took them too long (about 40 minutes) to plan each lesson, well in excess of the ten minutes suggested. But many agreed that once they were familiar with the system they were considerably faster. In a few cases, LPs reported that the activities suggested did not match the learning objectives. This may have affected the delivery. A common comment that came up repeatedly from the teaching staff was the need for more opportunity to try out the programme prior to implementation.
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